ScraperWiki Classic is now read-only.

But don’t worry! You can transfer this scraper to Morph.io if you want to continue editing it.

Transfer to Morph.io

Current status

Idle – not scheduled to run

Last run

1 year, 3 months ago

Scraped 1 page from data.parliament.uk

About this scraper

This scraper has no description.

This scraper is public

Anyone can see this scraper, and any registered user can edit it.

Users who have contributed to this scraper:

reference document_type last_published_date last_updated_date status title version teaser_text email authors link publisher_value publisher_id sections summary subjects
SN02812 StandardNote 2012-12-07T15:13:09.0346673+00:00 2012-12-07T15:12:45.5016648+00:00 PUBLISHED Public Finances: Economic Indicators page 23.0 The independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) forecast that public borrowing will be £109 billion in 2012/13, equivalent to 6.9% of GDP. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN02812 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] The independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) forecast that public borrowing will be £109 billion in 2012/13, equivalent to 6.9% of GDP. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN02802 StandardNote 2012-12-07T15:03:49.452961+00:00 2012-12-07T15:04:13.0341302+00:00 PUBLISHED Interest Rates and the Money Supply: Economic indicators page 34.0 At their December 2012 meeting, the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee voted to leave the Base Rate unchanged at 0.5% and to maintain the Asset Purchase Programme (quantitative easing) at £375 billion. Annual growth in M4 money supply excluding intermediate other financial corporations (a measure monitored by the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee) was 4.1% in October 2012, down from 4.2% in September 2012. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN02802 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] At their December 2012 meeting, the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee voted to leave the Base Rate unchanged at 0.5% and to maintain the Asset Purchase Programme (quantitative easing) at £375 billion. Annual growth in M4 money supply excluding intermediate other financial corporations (a measure monitored by the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee) was 4.1% in October 2012, down from 4.2% in September 2012. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06404 StandardNote 2012-12-07T14:59:19.7012346+00:00 2012-12-07T14:59:03.2431496+00:00 PUBLISHED Coalitions at Westminster 3.0 This standard note looks at coalition governments at Westminster. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06404 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] Following negotiations between the political parties, the Conservative and Liberal Democrat parties formed a coalition government in May 2010. The UK had not been governed by a formal coalition in peacetime since the National Government of 1931-40. The Labour/Liberal pact of 1977-78 did not go further than support on key votes. The Programme for Government set out the Coalition Government’s programme and the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act 2011 set out the date of 7 May 2015 as the date of the next general election unless the Government lost its support in the Commons and no alternative government could be formed within 14 days. Alternatively two thirds of the whole House must vote for a dissolution. The Programme for Government contained a list of policies where the governing parties could disagree. The Coalition Agreement for Stability and Reform set out the conventions to be adopted on collective responsibility and support for government policies in Parliament. The announcement by Nick Clegg on 6 August 2012 that he would instruct his party to vote against forthcoming orders to implement the parliamentary boundary reviews provided for in the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011 has led to some commentary about the impact on the coalition. Background on the position when there is no overall control over the Commons is given in Library Standard Note 4951 Hung Parliaments. That Note considers precedents and conventions governing how the monarch might decide which party should form a government, and when a request for a dissolution might be granted. House of Lords Library Note LLN 2011/002 Constitutional and Parliamentary Effect of Coalition Governments is also relevant. The Note was produced for a Lords debate on the subject on 20 January 2011. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN05859 StandardNote 2012-12-07T14:25:58.4540517+00:00 2012-12-07T14:25:54.1506045+00:00 PUBLISHED Pre-legislative scrutiny under the Coalition Government 4.0 This Standard Note takes as its starting point the formation of the Coalition Government in May 2010 and reviews both the commitments given on pre-legislative scrutiny and the draft bills published to date. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN05859 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] The Library Standard Note on Pre-legislative scrutiny (SN/PC/2822) provides a brief background to the development of pre-legislative scrutiny under the 1997-2010 Labour Governments. It also reviews the procedures followed in allocating draft bills to committees and by the committees in examining draft bills. It provides summary details of the draft bills published between 1997 and 2010 and their subsequent progress. It also reviews some of the analysis of pre-legislative scrutiny that has taken place. This Standard Note takes as its starting point the formation of the Coalition Government in May 2010 and reviews both the commitments given on pre-legislative scrutiny and the draft bills published to date. However, it also includes a table from the previous note, which gives details of the number of draft bills published each session, since 1997-98. Like the previous Note, this Note provides summary details of the draft bills announced or published since May 2010. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06499 StandardNote 2012-12-07T13:59:21.8813337+00:00 2012-12-07T13:59:18.5755206+00:00 PUBLISHED Effectiveness of select committees 1.0 This note introduces the Liaison Committee's review "Select committee effectiveness, resources and powers" (November 2012) and the academic literature on the effectiveness of select committees None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06499 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] In its 2009 report, Rebuilding the House, the Select Committee on Reform of the House of Commons (the Wright Committee) recommended that “the Liaison Committee should re-examine the current role of select committees, their resources and their tasks, and in particular how to deal with the increasing demands of time made of Members as their role grows”. On 8 November 2012, the Liaison Committee’s report, Select committee effectiveness, resources and powers, was published. The Committee reflected on the role of select committees and how they could do better at influencing Government. Measuring the influence of select committees has proved difficult but some academic work has been undertaken. An assessment of the influence of select committees by the Constitution Unit, University College of London, fed into the Liaison Committee’s report. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN02820 StandardNote 2012-12-07T11:30:57.3712202+00:00 2012-12-07T11:30:54.7840756+00:00 PUBLISHED Housing Market: Economic Indicators page 54.0 House prices on the Halifax index rose by 1% in November 2012 following a 0.1% fall in September. Prices are the same as they were a year ago on this measure. House prices on the Nationwide index fell by 0.1% in November 2012 after 0.6% increase in October. Prices were 1.2% lower in November compared with a year ago on this measure. There were 52,982 mortgage approvals in October a 5% rise on September. The number of approvals has remained generally flat since early 2010. There were 25,760 house building starts in England in Q3 2012, a 17.7% increase on Q2 2012. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN02820 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] House prices on the Halifax index rose by 1% in November 2012 following a 0.1% fall in September. Prices are the same as they were a year ago on this measure. House prices on the Nationwide index fell by 0.1% in November 2012 after 0.6% increase in October. Prices were 1.2% lower in November compared with a year ago on this measure. here were 52,982 mortgage approvals in October a 5% rise on September. The number of approvals has remained generally flat since early 2010. There were 25,760 house building starts in England in Q3 2012, a 17.7% increase on Q2 2012. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN05207 StandardNote 2012-12-07T11:14:33.6461744+00:00 2012-12-07T11:14:27.1328842+00:00 PUBLISHED Financial Indicators: Economic Indicators page 91.0 The FTSE-100 is up 0.3% compared with a month ago and up 6% on a year ago. The price of oil is down 4% on the month and down 3% on the year. The price of gold is up 1% on the month and down 2% on the year. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN05207 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] The FTSE-100 is up 0.3% compared with a month ago and up 6% on a year ago. The price of oil is down 4% on the month and down 3% on the year. The price of gold is up 1% on the month and down 2% on the year. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06339 StandardNote 2012-12-07T10:50:04.1211445+00:00 2012-12-07T10:50:00.7801882+00:00 PUBLISHED Reforming Financial Markets VI: Solvency II 2.0 This is one of a series of notes which looks at actual or proposed reforms of either certain parts of the financial services sector or reforms of certain activities. It deals with the Solvency II directive. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06339 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] This is one of a series of notes which looks at actual or proposed reforms of either certain parts of the financial services sector or reforms of certain activities. The entire sector has received worldwide attention from regulators, governments, consumer and intra-industry and professional groups following the financial crisis which began in 2007. Whilst the financial ‘rescue and recovery’ phase of the crisis is (mainly) past, the legislative response in many areas is now coming to a head. Regulatory and supervisory proposals have been discussed at various national and international fora and new legislation is proposed in many areas. These notes attempt to describe the progress made on individual issues through these phases. This note deals with the ‘omnibus’ directive normally called Solvency II. It brings together and updates several directives aimed at the insurance industry ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN05117 StandardNote 2012-12-07T10:38:31.226085+00:00 2012-12-07T10:38:27.1954268+00:00 PUBLISHED Drinking in the street 2.0 There is no general prohibition on drinking in the street but certain offences relating to alcohol may be committed in public places. Generally, the term “public place” is taken to mean “any place to which the public have access, whether on payment or otherwise”. It therefore includes public houses as well as streets and open spaces. However, in relation to designated public place orders, “public place” means a specific public place so designated by the local authority. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN05117 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] There is no general prohibition on drinking in the street but certain offences relating to alcohol may be committed in public places. Generally, the term “public place” is taken to mean “any place to which the public have access, whether on payment or otherwise”. It therefore includes public houses as well as streets and open spaces. However, in relation to designated public place orders, “public place” means a specific public place so designated by the local authority. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06294 StandardNote 2012-12-07T10:23:52.3767104+00:00 2012-12-07T10:23:49.7024558+00:00 PUBLISHED The Household Benefit Cap 6.0 This note explains how the household benefit cap will operate and summarises reactions to it, including attempts to amend the benefit cap as the Welfare Reform Act progressed through Parliament. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06294 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] As part of the October 2010 Spending Review the Government announced an intention to cap total household benefits at £500 per week for a family and £350 per week for a single person with no children from April 2013. Provisions to enable implementation of the cap are contained in sections 96 and 97 of the Welfare Reform Act 2012. The draft Housing Benefit (Benefit Cap) Regulations 2012 (containing the detailed provisions) were published for consultation and referred to the Social Security Advisory Committee (SSAC) in June 2012. The Regulations were subject to the affirmative resolution procedure and were laid on 16 July 2012. They were considered by the Second Delegated Legislation Committee (House of Commons) and in Grand Committee (House of Lords) on 6 November 2012. They were approved in a deferred division of the House of Commons on 21 November 2012 by 283 votes to 203. The benefit cap is one of the welfare reform measures announced as part of the Government’s deficit reduction plans. It is expected to deliver fiscal savings of £275m in 2013/14 and £275m in 2014/15 (cash terms) or £270m in 2013/14 and £265m in 2014/15 (2012/13 prices). The Housing Benefit (Benefit Cap) Regulations 2012 will introduce the cap on Housing Benefit from April 2013. The Universal Credit Main Scheme Regulations will, in due course, provide for an overall benefit cap within Universal Credit – these regulations will also be subject to the affirmative resolution procedure (expected December 2012). This note explains how the cap will operate and summarises reactions to it, including attempts to amend the benefit cap as the Welfare Reform Act progressed through the House of Lords. Background to the 2012 Act and its progress in the House of Commons can be found in Library Research Paper 11/23 and the Committee Stage Report Paper 11/48. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06080 StandardNote 2012-12-07T09:31:12.0596095+00:00 2012-12-07T10:25:18.504853+00:00 PUBLISHED Housing Benefit reform - supported housing 2.0 This paper explains the Government's proposals for the reform of Housing Benefit for residents in supported housing and includes a summary of early responses to the proposals. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06080 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] Supported housing that meets certain criteria is treated as “exempt accommodation” for Housing Benefit purposes. As such, the Housing Benefit Regulations that limit rents to defined local levels do not apply to accommodation where the landlord (housing association or voluntary organisation) provides “care, support or supervision.” In July 2011 the Government published Housing Benefit Reform – Supported Housing in which it set out proposals to reform the way in which Housing Benefit is treated for claimants living in certain types of supported housing. The Government argues that reform is necessary because of; inter alia, the complexity of the current system, rising expenditure and the introduction of the Universal Credit from 2013. Consultation closed on 9 October 2011. In September 2012 the Government confirmed that help towards housing costs for those living in supported accommodation would be provided outside Universal Credit. The Government has also confirmed that Housing Benefit paid to households in supported exempt accommodation will be disregarded from the household benefit cap (due to be introduced on 15 April 2013) and under Universal Credit. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06498 StandardNote 2012-12-07T08:41:42.3935735+00:00 2012-12-07T08:41:37.2007568+00:00 PUBLISHED Ash dieback disease: Chalara fraxinea 1.0 Chalara fraxinea is a fungus which is causing a serious disease of ash trees known as ash dieback. Ash dieback was discovered in the UK in February 2012 and a ban on ash imports introduced on 29 October 2012. This note provides information on the disease and the Government's actions to control it. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06498 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] Chalara fraxinea is a fungus which is causing a serious disease of ash trees known as ash dieback. The infection causes wilting leaves and crown die back and it usually leads to tree death. The ash tree is a significant part of the UK landscape and one of Britain’s few native, tree species with important conservation value. There are approximately 80 million ash trees in the UK representing 5% of Britain's woodland cover. Ash dieback was confirmed in the UK in February 2012 and a ban on ash imports introduced on 29 October 2012 after a voluntary moratorium by the industry. The Horticultural Trades Association asked for a ban back in 2009, having seen the impact of the disease in Denmark. Much of the immediate debate on the issue therefore focussed on how the UK Government reacted to these early warnings and why it did not act sooner to ban ash imports. Now that the disease has been confirmed in established trees in the UK, the focus has shifted to informing and developing action plans to deal with the disease in the short and longer term. In addition, a Tree Health and Plant Biosecurity Taskforce has been established to review the UK's strategic approach to tree health and biosecurity. Its final report is due in January 2013. The Task Force published an interim report on 6 December 2012 along with Defra’s Interim Chalara Control Plan. This note will be updated to provide more detailed analysis of these in due course. The current scientific understanding is that the disease only spreads in the summer (the period of spore release) so the Government is seeking to develop its response whilst there is a window of opportunity for action. Overall, the current approach is to try and slow the spread of the disease and to minimise its impact to gain time to find those trees with genetic resistance and to restructure our woodlands to make them more resilient. POST Note No 394 Invasive Tree Pests and Diseases (October 2011) provides further detail on the UK plant health regime in general. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
LLN 2012/042 LordsLibraryNote 2012-12-06T18:02:01.5498762+00:00 2012-12-07T12:52:01.5023658+00:00 PUBLISHED Autumn Statement 2012: Reaction 1.1 This Library Note provides a brief summary of the key measures announced yesterday in the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, before outlining the immediate reaction to the Statement as expressed by the Shadow Chancellor in the House of Commons and by a range of organisations and commentators. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/LLN-2012-042 House of Lords Library 25284 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] This Library Note provides a brief summary of the key measures announced yesterday in the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, before outlining the immediate reaction to the Statement as expressed by the Shadow Chancellor in the House of Commons and by a range of organisations and commentators. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06497 StandardNote 2012-12-06T17:35:09.8520614+00:00 2012-12-06T17:35:07.3948562+00:00 PUBLISHED UK - Commonwealth trade statistics 1.0 This short note looks at UK - Commonwealth trade statistics. It has been prepared for a Westminster Hall Private Members’ Debate on Commonwealth Trade on Wednesday 12 December 2012. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06497 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] This short note looks at UK - Commonwealth trade statistics. It has been prepared for a Westminster Hall Private Members’ Debate on Commonwealth Trade on Wednesday 12 December 2012. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN04601 StandardNote 2012-12-06T17:26:18.3174096+00:00 2012-12-06T17:26:15.5681478+00:00 PUBLISHED Insurance and discrimination laws: motor and travel insurance 3.0 This note outlines how the insurance industry operates within the law on discrimination, particularly with respect to age and sex discrimination. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN04601 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] This note outlines how the insurance industry operates within the law on discrimination, particularly with respect to age and sex discrimination. Old people frequently find it difficult or expensive to get travel insurance and a European Court ruling with respect to gender-pricing will end a long standing exemption for the industry from rules covering sex discrimination as of December 2012. This note focuses on these two issues. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06496 StandardNote 2012-12-06T13:56:28.5897921+00:00 2012-12-06T13:56:25.598459+00:00 PUBLISHED Financial Services Bill: House of Lords Report & Third Reading stages 1.0 A guide to the main amendments agreed to during the Report and Thrid Reading stages of the Financial Services Bill 2012 None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06496 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] This note summarises (mainly) government amendments passed during the Report and Third Reading Stages of the Financial Services Bill in the House of Lords. Another standard note (SN/BT/6456) describes the Lords’ committee stages. It includes the Gvoernment's new committment regarding regulation of pay day loans and the introduction of new provisions bringing benchmark activities (such as LIBOR) within the explicit remit of the regulators. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
RP12/76 ResearchPaper 2012-12-06T13:00:59.4278606+00:00 2012-12-07T11:33:24.0644179+00:00 PUBLISHED Pakistan in 2013 1.1 2013 will be another important year for Pakistan. Federal and provincial elections will be held during the first half of the year. If, as seems increasingly likely, the Pakistan People’s Party-led Government sees out its full term in office and hands over to a civilian successor, it will be the first time in Pakistan’s history that this has happened. But the political and economic situation remains highly volatile and unpredictable. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/RP12-76 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] 2013 will be another important year for Pakistan. Federal and provincial elections will be held during the first half of the year. If, as seems increasingly likely, the Pakistan People’s Party-led Government sees out its full term in office and hands over to a civilian successor, it will be the first time in Pakistan’s history that this has happened. But the political and economic situation remains highly volatile and unpredictable. In addition, by the end of 2013 the coalition allies, led by the United States, are expected to have withdrawn more of their combat forces from neighbouring Afghanistan – with total withdrawal the following year. Pakistan’s policies and actions will be pivotal in shaping the outcome there. Further, the run-up to elections in India in 2014 could affect the fragile peace efforts once again underway between these enduring rivals. During 2013, the wider world will probably continue to view developments in Pakistan primarily through the prism of Islamist militancy and the actions taken (or not) to combat it by the Federal Government. This is understandable, but it is crucial not to oversimplify the country’s politics by neglecting the many other factors which shape its trajectory. This paper seeks to create that wider lens on Pakistan. It begins by surveying the electoral landscape in Pakistan as 2013 draws near, before going on to assess the record in office of the Federal Government, led by the Pakistan People’s Party, since 2008. The paper then looks at Pakistan’s complex and often fraught relationships with other countries since 2008, focusing specifically on the US, India, Afghanistan, China, the UK and the EU. It also reviews development and humanitarian aid to Pakistan since 2008. The paper ends with a summary of recent expert views of Pakistan’s ‘possible futures’. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN03898 StandardNote 2012-12-06T12:24:20.4762874+00:00 2012-12-06T12:24:17.078115+00:00 PUBLISHED Powers of attorney 2.0 A power of attorney is a deed by which a person (the donor) authorises another person (the attorney, sometimes called the donee) to act on behalf of the donor. It is not a document which can be applied for by one individual on behalf of another. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN03898 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] A power of attorney is a deed by which a person (the donor) authorises another person (the attorney, sometimes called the donee) to act on behalf of the donor. It is not a document which can be applied for by one individual on behalf of another. An ordinary power of attorney automatically comes to an end as soon as the donor becomes mentally incapable. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 created a new form of power of attorney, the lasting power of attorney (LPA). The relevant provisions were implemented on 1 October 2007. There are two types of LPA: a Property and Financial Affairs LPA under which a donor may authorise an attorney to make decisions on the donor’s behalf in relation to financial matters; and a Health and Welfare LPA which enables a donor to authorise an attorney to act in relation to health and welfare matters after the donor has lost mental capacity. Until 1 October 2007, it was possible to create an enduring power of attorney (EPA). An EPA may authorise an attorney either to act with immediate effect in relation to the donor’s property and financial affairs and to continue to act after the donor has become mentally incapable; or to act as attorney only after the donor has lost mental capacity. EPAs could not authorise an attorney to make decisions on health and welfare matters. It has not been possible to create a new EPA since 1 October 2007. However, properly executed EPAs made prior to 1 October 2007 continue to be valid. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN02815 StandardNote 2012-12-06T11:20:53.7175493+00:00 2012-12-06T11:20:50.5098933+00:00 PUBLISHED UK Balance of Trade: Economic Indicators page 26.0 On a quarterly basis, the current account deficit was £20.8 billion in Q2 2012, widening from £15.4 billion in Q1 2012. The surplus on services rose to £17.9 billion while the deficit on goods rose to £28.0 billion. The overall monthly deficit on goods and services combined in October was £3.6bn, widening from £2.5bn in September. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN02815 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] On a quarterly basis, the current account deficit was £20.8 billion in Q2 2012, widening from £15.4 billion in Q1 2012. The surplus on services rose to £17.9 billion while the deficit on goods rose to £28.0 billion. The overall monthly deficit on goods and services combined in October was £3.6bn, widening from £2.5bn in September. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
SN06485 StandardNote 2012-12-05T20:57:09.6179385+00:00 2012-12-07T15:58:35.5555138+00:00 PUBLISHED The 2012 Autumn Statement 1.2 This note summarises the main points of the Autumn Statement. None ["DummyAuthor1", "DummyAuthor2"] http://data.parliament.uk/BriefingPapers/PublisherService.svc/briefingpapers/SN06485 House of Commons Library 25267 ["DummySection1", "DummySection2"] The Chancellor presented the 2012 Autumn Statement against a gloomy economic background. The economy has only recently emerged from a double dip recession and has contracted over the first nine months of 2012. The Chancellor has been forced to admit that reducing the deficit will take longer than originally thought. The Autumn Statement included a wide range of policy decisions with significant cost or revenue implications for the Treasury. The package of measures as a whole was, however, fiscally neutral over the course of the Parliament. In other words, there was no net giveaway or takeaway. On taxation, the Chancellor announced a further increase in the income tax personal allowance and a further cut in corporation tax. The increase in fuel duty planned for January was been cancelled. Further restrictions of pension tax relief were introduced. On spending, many working age benefits will increase by only 1% for three years from 2013/14. There will be further cuts to government departments’ resource budgets, with some areas of spending being protected. Capital spending will increase by over £ 5 billion. As in last year’s Autumn Statement, the OBR has significantly downgraded its forecasts for economic growth. It now expects the economy to contract by 0.1% this year, compared with growth of 0.8% in its March forecast. Growth in 2013 and 2014 is expected to be 1.2% and 2.0%, down from March’s forecasts of 2.0% and 2.7%. The deficit will continue to fall but more slowly than previously forecast. The statement showed lower borrowing in 2012/13 compared with 2011/12. This year’s figures are flattered by a number of special factors. Forecasts for public debt as a percentage of GDP have been revised upwards. The Government is on course to meet its borrowing rule but the OBR’s forecasts show the debt rule being breached. The Government has decided against any further spending cuts or tax rises which would allow the debt target to be achieved. ["DummySubject1", "DummySubject2"]
December 2012
Permalink Hide details Show details 1355091946.761328_7a214302-05fd-4fc7-beb2-f73c5bdf1530 22:25, 9 December 2012 1355003490.217730_3cefd12f-f98d-4bab-a21d-7e4a9fda22b1 21:51, 8 December 2012 1355003380.667849_72313496-f949-4ec8-9ad9-8c6e05ba5716 21:49, 8 December 2012 1355003320.324393_8efe5cf5-6fad-4810-9d9d-487439339f1a 21:48, 8 December 2012 1355003232.164404_0b552ba6-bcf2-4610-9549-341ed427edc7 21:47, 8 December 2012 1355003205.302925_2597938a-16ba-4e43-90fe-caeb9a00900c 21:46, 8 December 2012 1355003114.880870_0476a9a1-f09c-4f65-b99f-76caf49ebfbf 21:45, 8 December 2012 1355003009.167429_bd0de947-5954-4da2-8a11-c0cf50509c89 21:43, 8 December 2012
Run succeeded: - ran 8 times, most recently for 0 seconds (1 scraped pages, 20 records) 22:25, 9 December 2012

Loading...


          
Permalink Hide details Show details 1355002980.866647_96b104cd-5b67-47b0-af96-7f2fe647d676 21:43, 8 December 2012
Run failed: #<NoMethodError: undefined method `author' for main:Object> - ran for 0 seconds (1 scraped pages, 0 records) 21:43, 8 December 2012

Loading...


          
Permalink Hide details Show details 1355002921.178653_d2977b29-2a19-423f-ac5c-f8836c6a4770 21:42, 8 December 2012
Run succeeded: - ran 1 time, most recently for 0 seconds (1 scraped pages, 20 records) 21:42, 8 December 2012

Loading...


          
Hide changes Show changes 9 21:42, 8 December 2012 8 8 21:41, 8 December 2012 7 7 21:40, 8 December 2012 6 6 21:39, 8 December 2012 5
Edited by Robert Brook 4 times 21:42, 8 December 2012

Loading...

Difference between, revision and previous revision


            
Hide changes Show changes 5 22:42, 7 December 2012 4 4 22:41, 7 December 2012 3 3 22:41, 7 December 2012 2 2 22:40, 7 December 2012 1 1 22:40, 7 December 2012 0
Edited by Robert Brook 5 times 22:42, 7 December 2012

Loading...

Difference between, revision and previous revision


            
Hide first version Show first version 0 22:36, 7 December 2012
Edited by Robert Brook 22:36, 7 December 2012

Loading...

Difference between, revision and previous revision