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<p>Thank you for that introduction Patrick. It’s great to be here at the NEC today talking about our plans for high speed rail. Before we start our panel discussion, I want to talk to you about the bigger picture for HS2. And the political context of the project. The central role it plays in the Coalition’s transport strategy. The huge benefits I believe it can bring to the West Midlands, this country as a whole, and British business in particular. How it fits into our wider agenda for rebalancing and rebuilding Britain’s economy. Why - even in a period of fiscal austerity - we are committed to pursuing such a huge investment. But, also the very strong opposition which will be articulated against the project and the importance of the business lobby in making the case for High Speed Rail.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Economic Context</strong> <strong> <br /> </strong>Let me first of all set the economic backdrop: As business people, you don’t need me to tell you that we faced an unprecedented fiscal crisis when we came to office. We were saddled with the biggest budget deficit in the G20 and had just limped out of the longest and deepest recession in our peacetime history. Every single day we were adding £400 million to our national debt. Had we kept to the spending plans we inherited, we would be paying out nearly £70 billion a year in interest alone by the end of the Parliament - more than we spend on schooling our children and defending our country combined. If we’d let those debts go on rising, it would have led to higher interest rates, undermined confidence in Britain and put the recovery at risk. So we have had to take tough decisions to get the deficit under control. By cancelling £6 billion worth of planned public spending this year. By setting out, in our Emergency Budget in June, an ambitious four year plan to eliminate entirely our structural deficit and get debt falling as a percentage of GDP. And by delivering the conclusions of the Spending Review, with firm and fixed spending totals for each government department for the rest of this Parliament, and far-reaching reforms to welfare and our public services. Our early action to balance Britain’s books is already paying dividends. Our AAA credit rating has been reconfirmed and we now have a clean bill of health from the IMF - who described our budget as ‘essential’ to securing the conditions for sustainable economic growth. But of course, that vital fiscal readjustment is only part of the story.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Growth and importance of infrastructure investment<br /> </strong>The next challenge is to secure the growth, the jobs, the investment that will drive our prosperity in the future. We must now lay the foundations for building a strong, competitive, balanced economy for the longer term, while delivering on our climate change obligations. And infrastructure investment – as the Chancellor has clearly spelt out - will be a key part of our approach. We will not repeat past mistakes where governments spent too much and invested too little. Or of indiscriminately cutting infrastructure investment - previously seen as the easy option behind which countless governments, of all persuasions, have sheltered from taking the tough decisions on current spending, and on welfare in particular. The settlement Transport received in the Spending Review - £18 billion of rail investments; £4 billion in Highways Agency investment, and £6 billion on local transport investments - demonstrates the Coalition’s commitment to prioritising the projects that will support economic growth and job creation. That settlement also included over £750 million to fund the development of our plans for a national high speed rail network over the Spending Review period, with the bulk of capital expenditure occurring after 2015 - when, on our plans, the public finances will be back in balance. And today I want to explain why I believe high speed rail can make a critical contribution to our economic future. And talk through the processes and the politics that lie ahead.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>The Government’s transport strategy<br /> </strong>When I took over this brief, the challenge was clear: with limited resources to support economic growth and rebalancing, and deliver on the Government’s climate change agenda. The need for a cross-modal approach was obvious. For instance, our decision to reject new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted because of local environmental impacts and CO2 concerns, coupled with the need to ensure that the scarce capacity at our international airports is available for the medium- and long-haul routes that are vital to our economic success, inevitably points to modal shift on domestic and short-haul European travel. The success of high speed rail across Europe has shown how effectively such links can cater for journeys that had previously been dominated by aviation. That’s why our commitment to a high speed rail network has been a key factor in taking the difficult decisions we have taken on additional capacity at London&#39;s airports. And that’s why we have said from the outset that a meaningful High Speed Rail network must include a link to our principal gateway airport and to the HS1 line to the Channel Tunnel. But high speed rail isn’t just about modal shift. It’s also about addressing the rail capacity challenges that are facing our most congested inter-urban routes. Reducing crowding, improving reliability, speeding up journeys, and catering for the increased demand that comes from continued economic growth. And, of course, it is not only inter-city journeys that would benefit from a new high speed line. As long distance point to point services transfer to the new line, valuable capacity is released to meet the growing demand for longer-distance commuter travel, for services to intermediate towns and for freight on the East and West Coast mainlines. High speed rail will be an unbeatable option for inter-urban travel. With none of the hassle of short-haul flying. And even the greatest petrol-head could not realistically contemplate a 49 minute London to Birmingham journey – and if he did, he’d probably need another 49 minutes to find somewhere to park!</p> <p> <strong>The role of high-speed rail in delivering the Government&#39;s growth strategy<br /> </strong>But high speed rail isn’t just a central plank of our transport strategy. It is also vital to our wider plans for securing sustainable economic growth.<br />In the short-term it has the potential to create thousands of jobs planning, constructing and operating the proposed line. A fifteen to twenty year programme to roll-out new high speed rail lines, on which construction would begin as Crossrail is completed, would also form part of a predictable pipeline of major rail infrastructure projects. Allowing the UK supply chain to plan for the long term, reducing costs and building a skills base for the future.<br />In the medium term, the proposals put forward by HS2 Ltd would lead to huge regeneration opportunities here in Birmingham, in London and in due course in Manchester, Leeds and South Yorkshire.  For example, the major regeneration area of Eastside would find itself right at the heart of Britain’s national transport infrastructure. But in the longer term, I firmly believe high speed rail would deliver a transformational change to the way Britain works and competes in the 21st century. As profound a change, perhaps, as the coming of the original railways delivered in the 19th century and the advent of motorways did in the 20th. It would slash journey times between major urban centres and international gateways.  It would free up capacity on the conventional mainline network to enable the continuing shift of freight from roads and onto rail, reducing carbon emissions and cutting congestion.<br />It would allow the economies of the Midlands and the North to benefit directly from the global magnetic effect of London, tackling the North-South divide in economic growth rates more effectively than half a century of regional policy has done as we expand labour markets and merge the travel to work areas of our major conurbations. West Midlands firms will be able more readily to access the markets and customers in London, while faster links from London to this region will make it more attractive to investors.The proposed Birmingham Interchange Station also would bring huge advantages in terms of connectivity to the wider West Midlands, with links to the motorway network, the airport, Birmingham International Station and the National Exhibition Centre where we meet today. And our commitment to extend the network beyond Birmingham has the potential to bring greater benefits still.  By connecting the West Midlands with Manchester, Sheffield and Leeds, as well as the East Midlands, high speed rail can merge them more and more into a single economic area, with the capability to compete not just with London, but with the other economic centres across Europe.<br />I submit that, reducing the journey time between two cities to 40 minutes represents not merely a quantitive reduction in travel time, but a qualitative change in the way they interact together.  High speed rail will merge our great population centres into a single economic hinterland.  In short it will provide us with a railway for the 21st century.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Recent route developments<br /> </strong>It was the transformational potential of high speed rail that captured the imagination of David Cameron back in 2008. And since we have been in Government, we have lost no time in pressing ahead with this exciting project. We’re continuing to develop and refine our proposals for the route from London to Birmingham, which will cut the journey time to just 49 minutes, even allowing for stops at Old Oak Common and Birmingham Interchange.  Possibly 40 minutes on a non-stop service. And we’re working on plans to build a truly national high speed network as set out in the Coalition Agreement.<br />At the beginning of October, following work by HS2 Ltd, I announced that our preferred option for High Speed Rail north of Birmingham was for two separate corridors. One direct to Manchester, and then connecting onto the West Coast main line, and the other to Leeds via the East Midlands and South Yorkshire - with stations in both areas - before connecting onto the East Coast mainline south of York. This would reduce journey times to Manchester and Leeds to around 80 minutes - only slightly longer than many journeys across the capital. Meanwhile, the trip from Birmingham to Leeds would be almost halved - dropping from around 2 hours today to just an hour and 5 minutes. And we’ve commissioned and received advice from HS2 Ltd on the options for the link to Heathrow, and for connecting to the wider European high speed network via the HS1 line.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Addressing the critics<br /> </strong>Now, I know that our plans for high speed rail are not universally popular. If I didn&#39;t know it before, I found out doing a series of meetings in the communities through which the proposed route will run between London and Birmingham. People are worried about the impact on the countryside. Some say the business case doesn’t stack up and that the demand projections are fanciful. And some say that we won’t get this through Parliament in a million years. Let me take each of those challenges in turn.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Environment<br /> </strong>I fully understand that the national benefits of high speed rail have to be balanced against the impact on local environments. That’s why, in recent months, I have been visiting communities that will be affected by the proposed route. Listening to them. And why I, personally, have been over every mile of the route with HS2 engineers, looking at the stress points; challenging the alignment; exploring different approaches to mitigating the most intrusive local impacts. I am a great lover of our English countryside.  And I do not take the decisions on the HS2 lightly. We will do everything we practically can to mitigate the acoustic and visual impacts of the proposed line and deliver a solution that far exceeds the expectations of those who will be affected by it and who are understandably apprehensive of the impact of HS2. I will personally monitor the mitigation proposals - visual and acoustic - of every mile of this railway. And where we can’t hide it, we will make every effort to make it an object of architectural beauty.  Just as Brunel’s structures, once resisted as desecrating the countryside, are now accepted as enhancing it. We have launched an Exceptional Hardship scheme for homeowners who need to relocate urgently, and whose property values have been affected by the published route proposal. And we’ve committed to consulting on a further scheme to help those whose property values are significantly eroded by the construction of a high speed line.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Business case<br /> </strong>Of course, it&#39;s not only the route and the environmental impact that have come under scrutiny. There are also many people who have questioned the business case for the project and, indeed, whether a line of this kind is needed at all. Our interurban railways undoubtedly face a major capacity challenge.<br />Rail journeys within the West Midlands have increased by almost 40 per cent over the last 5 years – with crippling capacity pressures forecast in the coming decades. So the real question is not whether demand will increase, but what are the options for dealing with it. Some people have argued that upgrading the existing West Coast Main Line is the best way to meet demand increases. But I am unconvinced that that is a credible option. First, because reliability would undoubtedly deteriorate through trying to squeeze ever more capacity out of existing, mixed-use, railway lines.  In contrast, a new, dedicated high speed passenger line could improve reliability by creating increasing segregation between different service types. And the released capacity created by HS2 would provide relief for the some of the worst pressures on the local and regional rail network in the West Midlands. More frequent and new services, improved timetabling, and greater resilience.  Attracting more travellers from the roads, relieving congestion and improving journey reliability.<br />Second, trying to deliver such a massive capacity upgrade on working lines would try the patience of the hardiest of rail passengers. Not to mention the occupiers of the thousands of homes that would need to be demolished. We all remember the last West Coast main line upgrade. [Lew Grade’s “Raising the Titanic” quip]. And finally, because no upgrade of existing infrastructure can deliver the huge improvements in journey times, and step-change transformation of our economic geography, that a new high speed network would bring.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Political consensus<br /> </strong>And as for getting the Bill through Parliament – well, don’t think I underestimate the scale of the challenge. I’ve heard enough war stories over the years from colleagues who have served on hybrid Bill committees to know just how challenging it is to get them onto the statute book. The key to the success of a project like this, one that will be delivered over many Parliaments, is cross-party consensus. Because this is not a plan for a Parliament. It is a plan for many generations and Parliaments to come. And we can only invest in it if we are clear that it will proceed over four or five Parliaments, whatever the political weather. So I’m grateful for the supportive position adopted so far by Opposition transport spokesmen – and of my predecessor. I will maintain an open and constructive dialogue with them as we move forward with this exciting project. On High Speed Rail, if on nothing else, I believe they will agree that “we are all in this together.”</p> <p> <br /> <strong>What happens next?<br /> </strong>Before I conclude, let me briefly set out what will happen next. We intend to announce the package for consultation, including a preferred route between London and the West Midlands, a corridor preference to Leeds and Manchester, and detailed plans for links to Heathrow and HS1 before Xmas. The consultation we will be launching in the New Year will be as comprehensive, inclusive and wide ranging as possible…….an opportunity for everyone to make their views clear. It will cover both the Government’s overall high speed rail strategy and the route of the initial London-Birmingham phase of High Speed 2. We will analyse the no doubt numerous responses, and publish our response, setting out our proposed way forward, in December 2011, with the aim of getting the first hybrid Bill for the London-Birmingham route to Royal Assent by the end of this Parliament. But one thing is clear: the opponents of the High Speed Railway are organised, determined and well-financed.  They will make the case against the project – in spades. It is essential that those who see the power of High Speed Rail to deliver the economic change and those who benefit from the transformation it will bring to our economy, speak up and speak out – loudly and clearly – in favour of this project. If they do not, the argument could be lost by default.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Conclusion<br /> </strong>So there is still much that needs to be done. And I do not for one minute underestimate the challenges involved in making high speed rail a reality.<br />I first looked at this project through the sceptical eyes of a Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury. And to those who ask how Britain can afford to invest in a project of this scale, I reply that we cannot afford not to invest in our future. And that if we are to prosper as a nation, every part of that nation has to prosper. It is a project that could transform the social and economic geography of Britain, and transform the role of cities like Birmingham.  By delivering greater mobility and connectivity; slashing journey times; and becoming the mode of choice for intercity travel. The potential to reduce our carbon footprint, shift demand from air to rail and to transform the way we use our existing railway. Above all, the potential to tackle the North-South gap in economic growth rates, a prize that has eluded all modern governments, boosting economic growth across the whole UK, supporting a re-balancing our economy and helping to secure our competitiveness. In short, a vital part of our plan to secure Britain’s place in the 21st century global economy.<br />Thank you.<br /> </p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-03-02 15:54:16 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20101130?view=Standard The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP High Speed Rail Business Debate None 29 November 2010 None High Speed Rail Business Debate, NEC Birmingham
<p>Thank you, Brian, for that introduction. It’s a pleasure to be with you all in North Tyneside this afternoon.</p> <p>If I may, I would like to address you at two levels today.</p> <p>Of course you care about the North East and its transport, but you are also business people with an interest in the reputation and performance of UK Plc.</p> <p>I want to explain to you why I think the North East has a key part to play in the economic recovery, and what I am doing to contribute to it.</p> <p>Why I think the North East should be talking itself up – not doing itself down.</p> <p>What we as a Government will be doing to build the balanced and low-carbon economy that’s essential for our future prosperity, and what I as Transport Secretary am doing to ensure that Transport contributes to that agenda.</p> <p>The long and proud industrial heritage of this region is well known.</p> <p>During the 18th and 19th centuries the North East was the cradle of the industrial revolution.</p> <p>And in transport heritage, it bows to no one as the home of the first public steam railway in the world, between Darlington and Stockton-on-Tees.</p> <p>Then in the first half of the last century, this region went on to establish a world class reputation in everything from building ships, to mining coal, to brewing beer.</p> <p>Of course, the last quarter of the 20th century presented major challenges to the heavy industrial base as the world economy began to globalise. And I am extremely conscious that the trauma of that change is still felt today.</p> <p>But if we fast forward to the 21st century, and science and research, information technology, knowledge-based companies and high-tech manufacturers have become the hallmarks of the new North East economy.</p> <p>We see that today, the region is one of the UK’s top performers in attracting foreign direct investment, with an automotive sector worth close to £1 billion in local Gross Value Added, a third of this country’s total pharmaceutical production and nearly two thirds of the UK’s petrochemical industry.</p> <p>And, again as Martin highlighted, from wind and solar power generation, to biotechnology and carbon capture, the North East is fast emerging as a national centre and a global leader in the key areas of green growth.<br />These are all achievements of which you can rightly be proud and on which you can build for the future.</p> <p>Of course, I recognise that getting our economy back on a sustainable track is going to involve some very hard slog – here in the North East, and across the UK as a whole.</p> <p>But at least we are now talking about getting back on course; a year or two ago, we were talking about how close we were to the abyss.</p> <p>And now that our economy is on the road to recovery, Britain must face up to an unprecedented fiscal crisis.</p> <p>We inherited the biggest budget deficit in the G20 and had just limped out of the longest and deepest recession in our peacetime history.</p> <p>Every single day we were adding £400 million to our national debt.</p> <p>Had we kept to the spending plans we inherited, we would be paying out nearly £70 billion a year in debt interest alone by the end of the Parliament.</p> <p>That’s more than we spend on schooling our children and defending our country put together.</p> <p>Letting those debts carry on rising would have led to higher interest rates, undermined confidence in Britain and put the recovery at risk.</p> <p>If we were now where Ireland is, paying interest rates of about 6% for UK gilts, we would be looking not at £70 billion a year of debt interest, but more like £180 billion – or 12% of our GDP.</p> <p>So we had to take tough decisions to get the deficit under control and keep interest rates low.</p> <p>By cancelling £6 billion worth of planned public spending this year.</p> <p>By setting out, in our Emergency Budget in June, an ambitious four year plan to eliminate entirely our structural deficit and get debt falling as a percentage of GDP.</p> <p>And a month ago, we delivered the conclusions of the Spending Review, with firm and fixed spending totals for each government department for the rest of this Parliament, and far-reaching reforms to welfare and our public services.</p> <p>Already we’re seeing the rewards.</p> <p>AAA credit status confirmed, Britain almost a poster-child of the bond markets and accolades from economic forecasters and business organisations alike.</p> <p>The independent Office for Budget Responsibility projects falling unemployment and positive economic growth in each of the next four years.</p> <p>And more good news yesterday with national employment up nearly 170,000 net over the last quarter, despite public sector cuts.</p> <p>In the North East, an additional 47,000 people are in work compared to a year ago.</p> <p>Fiscal consolidation and the confidence that discipline in the public finances brings has been a necessary condition for Britain’s recovery. But it is only part of the story.</p> <p>Our really big challenge is to build on the foundations that sound public finances provide to secure the growth, the jobs, and the private sector investment that will drive our prosperity in the years ahead.</p> <p>Building a strong, competitive economy for the longer term, while delivering on our climate change targets.</p> <p>The Chancellor made clear in his Budget speech that infrastructure investment will be a vital part of our approach.</p> <p>We are determined to avoid, at all costs, repeating the mistake of the recent past of spending too much but investing too little.</p> <p>And we will not repeat the mistakes of successive British Governments by trying to fix the public finances by slashing capital spend. We have made the tough choice to tackle waste, inefficiency and to tackle head on welfare to protect infrastructure investment.</p> <p>In science and technology; in power generation; in skills – but above all, in transport.</p> <p>Demonstrating the Coalition’s commitment to prioritising the projects that will put Britain – and this region - back in the game.</p> <p>Over the next four years, we will invest over £30 billion in road, rail and local transport projects right across Britain – more than was invested in the last four years.</p> <p>Our plans for a high speed rail network lie at the heart of the Coalition’s transport policy and our strategy to rebalance and rebuild Britain’s economy.</p> <p>This ambitious and exciting project would allow the economies of the Midlands and the North to benefit directly from the global pull of London and the south east, tackling the North-South divide in economic growth rates more effectively than half a century of regional policy has done, as we expand labour markets and merge the travel to work areas of our major conurbations. </p> <p>Providing better connections not just to London, but between the Midlands and the North as well.</p> <p>The journey time between Newcastle and Birmingham will be cut from 3 hours to around 2 hours 20 minutes.</p> <p>From London to Leeds, reduced to 80 minutes.</p> <p>In short, high speed rail would deliver transformational change to the way Britain works and competes in the 21st century. In many respects as profound a change as the coming of the original railways delivered in the 19th century and the advent of motorways did in the 20th.</p> <p>So since we came to office in May, we have pressed ahead with our plans.</p> <p>At the beginning of October, I announced that our preferred option for High Speed Rail north of Birmingham was for two separate corridors – the ‘Y’ option.</p> <p>One direct to Manchester, and then connecting onto the West Coast main line, and the other to Leeds via the East Midlands and South Yorkshire– with stations in both areas – before connecting onto the East Coast mainline north of Leeds to deliver improved journey times to the North East and Edinburgh.</p> <p>And in the next few weeks I will launch the detailed proposals that we will consult on in the New Year - which will include a preferred route between London and the West Midlands, and a corridor preference to Leeds and Manchester.</p> <p>The new capacity high speed rail delivers will be vital in addressing the rail capacity challenges that are facing our most congested inter-urban routes.</p> <p>Freeing up capacity to enable the continuing shift of freight from roads and onto rail, reducing carbon emissions and cutting congestion</p> <p>But there’s a problem. In Britain, we have one of the most expensive railways in Europe. More expensive to build, less efficient to maintain, and more expensive to ride on compared with other European systems.</p> <p>That is not acceptable.<br />So we will review and reform the way the rail industry functions. The way Network Rail operates. And the way franchises are let and run.<br />Building on the work of Sir Roy McNulty’s value-for-money study, to drive efficiency in rail investment and operations, so that the railway can play its crucial part in delivering sustainable transport for the future and offer a fair deal to passengers and taxpayers alike.<br />I want to say something about the Intercity Express Programme, which would provide new high-speed trains for the East Coast and Great Western Main Lines.<br />I recognise how important this project is to this region and, as you know, we have been carrying out further value for money analysis of the programme following the review published by Sir Andrew Foster in the summer.</p> <p>We are now considering a revised proposition from Agility Trains, as well as the alternatives to the IEP identified by Sir Andrew Foster.</p> <p>We will take into account the huge benefits Hitachi’s proposed factory in Newton Aycliffe would bring to this area, placing Britain at the heart of the European rail industry.</p> <p>But, in the wake of Sir Andrew’s findings, we must also be mindful of the importance of ensuring whatever decision we make delivers the best possible value for taxpayers’ money – and that the commercial, legal and technical case for the decision we take at the end of the process is a robust one.</p> <p>I know you are eager for a decision, and I can assure you that I will make an announcement on the future of the programme to the House of Commons at the earliest possible opportunity.</p> <p>But, exciting as all the new rail investment is, a balanced and sustainable transport strategy cannot just be about rail.</p> <p>We should also remember that over 80% of journeys are made by car, with our roads representing our greatest investment in national transport infrastructure.</p> <p>Roads and cars have had a bit of a bad press since the focus has been on climate change, but they remain the only practicable mode of transport in many areas.</p> <p>So this Government is committed to decarbonising motoring so that, while we work to meet our climate change obligations, we can ensure the car remains an integral part of Britain’s future transport plans</p> <p>That is why we are supporting the ultra-low emissions technologies that will see the carbon output of cars plummet over the next two decades</p> <p>Our Plug-In Car Grant will give a generous consumer incentive of up to £5,000 towards the purchase of a next-generation ultra low emission car.</p> <p>Our commitment to this generous subsidy, even in the face of severe public spending restraint, to kick-start the market for low-carbon vehicles has ensured that Britain will be a principle launch market for global manufacturers. Bolstering our status as a leading player in green vehicle technology.</p> <p>Order books for the first new generation, all-electric vehicle – the Nissan Leaf- opened in Britain in the summer and the first vehicles will be delivered early next year.</p> <p>Imported from Japan in the first instance, yes.</p> <p>But with Government support, by 2013 they will be rolling off the production lines in Nissan’s plant in Sunderland.</p> <p>Building on the pioneering work already being done in the North East on electric vehicle development – such as by the likes of Smith Electric Vehicles in Washington.</p> <p>Meanwhile, our Plugged-in Places programme – rolling out public charging infrastructure for these next-generation cars - will allow us to gather important information about the way people use electric cars.</p> <p>As one of three pilot areas, the North East is playing a key role in this exciting project.</p> <p>The pilot will mean that 1,300 charging points – located on streets and in car parks, and near retail and leisure facilities - will be rolled out across the region. I saw one of them in action in Newcastle City Centre this morning.</p> <p>Cementing the North East’s position in the vanguard of the green motoring revolution.</p> <h2>Investments in NE region</h2> <p>But besides those major national infrastructure investments, we’re also giving the green light to a number of key local and regional transport schemes that will directly benefit local commuters and businesses.</p> <p>The improvements to the East Coast Main Line that will result in faster and more reliable rail services. </p> <p>The £350 million upgrade of the Tyne and Wear Metro.</p> <p>The £37.5 million we’re investing in accelerating delivery of the Tees Valley Bus Network.</p> <p>A £2.25 million grant from our Green Bus Fund to Stagecoach North East for 26 diesel-electric hybrid buses to run on routes in Newcastle.</p> <p>Over £2 million in grant funding to help establish a public transport smartcard.  </p> <p>And today, I can announce a £2.8 million investment to increase the traffic capacity of the A19 Silverlink interchange in the short term.</p> <p>This will be completed next summer, ready for the opening of the second Tyne Tunnel and work will continue in parallel on the £108 million of A19 upgrades.</p> <h2>Localism / funding devolution</h2> <p>All these projects will give the local economy, and the local community, a vital shot in the arm. But if we are truly to unleash the growth potential of our regions, the way we deliver investment funding also needs reform.</p> <p>And for this Coalition Government, the preferred reform is localism.</p> <p>We want to devolve as much responsibility and funding as possible to local level – with far fewer civil servants sitting in Whitehall monitoring progress and setting targets.</p> <p>In transport, that means scrapping the multiple streams of transport resource funding for local government and replacing them with just two – a formula grant which will go to all authorities to allow them to set their own priorities…..</p> <p>…… and a Local Sustainable Transport Fund, worth some £560 million of capital and resource, which will consolidate the remaining money in a single pot for which local authorities can bid to support their plans for their areas.</p> <p>More widely, our Local Growth White Paper, published three weeks ago, takes forward proposals for our £1.5 billion Regional Growth Fund, which will be used to support projects which have significant growth potential and create sustainable private sector employment. In areas which are heavily dependent on the public sector – including transport projects.</p> <p>And, we have approved the formation of 24 Local Enterprise Partnerships across the United Kingdom; bottom-up partnerships between local authorities and businesses that will give local areas the opportunity to be the masters of their own economic destiny.</p> <p>I am delighted that the Tees Valley Partnership has been given the green light in the first wave of Local Enterprise Partnerships to be announced and I hope that further partnerships in the region can be taken forward in the coming months.</p> <p>From a transport perspective, I want to see how local enterprise partnerships can play a role in my Department’s local capital funding allocation.</p> <p>I will seek to work with them and local authorities to establish a way of delegating decision-making to them to allow them to develop truly innovative transport solutions. </p> <p>Helping to deliver the growth and the jobs that will get this area open for business again. </p> <h3>The prize – business investment and entrepreneurship</h3> <p>The North East should view these challenges with confidence. It has all the right ingredients for a strong and prosperous future:</p> <p>Its geography, with seaports perfectly positioned to exploit Britain’s prevailing trade patterns with continental Europe</p> <p>A transport infrastructure that we will continue to develop and improve, reducing journey times and cutting congestion.</p> <p>And most of all, its people: a skilled and educated workforce and extensive collaboration networks where cutting edge research institutions and internationally respected universities work hand in glove with industry.</p> <p>Of course, attracting the big iconic inward investors – the Nissans of this world – is crucially important.</p> <p>But much of the growth, the organic growth, will come from the North East’s own entrepreneurs; from the sole traders, from home grown small and medium sized businesses.</p> <p>Less glamorous, perhaps, than those major overseas investments, but just as crucial to the future of UK Plc.</p> <p>And this growth is real. It’s happening already.</p> <p>Which city has the fastest growing rate of increase of new business start ups in the UK, according to a recent Royal Mail study?</p> <p>Not London. Not Birmingham. Not Manchester. But Sunderland.</p> <h3>Concluding remarks</h3> <p>So the North East is a region with a great story to tell – one of entrepreneurship, resilience, and dynamism.</p> <p>Of course, there are tough times ahead, for all of us, as we seek to readjust to this new economic reality.</p> <p>But this is an area that’s already demonstrated – in spades – that it can reinvent itself, in the face of adversity, to respond to change.</p> <p>Continual re-invention as the world changes around us is likely to be a key hallmark of success in the global economy of the future.</p> <p>And I have no doubt that the North East can, and will, rise to that challenge in the years ahead and play its part in returning Britain to the path of sustainable economic growth and lasting prosperity.<br /> </p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-03-02 15:54:21 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond201011018?view=Standard The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP Transport Futures Seminar None 18 November 2010 None North East Economic Forum
<p>Ladies and gentlemen.</p> <p>It is a very great pleasure to welcome you here today for the launch of our consultation into high speed rail, and where more appropriate than Birmingham; a city with a proud industrial heritage - now looking firmly to the future - to diversify and grow - as it creates the jobs of tomorrow and plans to reap the benefits of HSR.</p> <p>This will be one of the most extensive and, potentially, most far reaching government consultations in history. The proposal we are consulting on is not merely a blueprint for a new national railway, speeding passengers in huge numbers between our largest and most important conurbations in state of the art 225 mph trains, but also a vision for the future of inter-city travel in the 21st century. An investment in infrastructure to deliver the long-term growth, jobs and prosperity that Britain needs if we are to retain our place in the world league tables. A once-in-a-generation chance to reshape our economic geography; bring our key cities closer together; regenerate our urban centres; and tackle the North-South divide that has held this country back for far too long.</p> <h2>Economic Context</h2> <p>It is ten months since the new Coalition Government began tackling the debt crisis that threatened to cripple the UK for a generation, and set about rebuilding our economy after one of the longest and deepest recessions on record. But rooting out waste, reforming welfare and balancing budgets is only part of the solution to the countryâ&euro;&trade;s economic problems. The next challenge is to secure the growth, the jobs, and the investment that will lay the foundations for a stronger, more balanced, more competitive economy in the long term â&euro;&ldquo; while delivering on our climate change obligations. And infrastructure investment â&euro;&ldquo; as the Chancellor has clearly spelt out â&euro;&ldquo; will be a crucial part of answering that challenge. Over the next few years, despite the squeeze on public spending, we will invest in Crossrail, in Thameslink and in London&#39;s tube upgrades. As these projects reach completion, we need to move the focus away from London - to the infrastructure that will support the wider UK economy.</p> <h2>Origins of HS2/ the problem</h2> <p>When we became the first party to commit to high speed rail in Opposition, we recognised its potential to rebuild and rebalance the UK economy through massive improvements in journey times, in connections between cities, and in capacity. We could see that the country needed a radical and visionary solution, to tackle the road congestion and rail overcrowding that are set to become significant obstacles to economic growth, and to deal with rising demand for inter-city travel in the future. Our railways have undergone a remarkable, and welcome renaissance. Against a baseline assumption at privatisation of continued, managed decline â&euro;&ldquo; the opposite has happened. Between 1994 and 2009, the number of miles travelled by rail passengers in Britain soared â&euro;&ldquo; from 18 billion to 32 billion â&euro;&ldquo; and that growth shows no sign of slowing. Network Rail estimates that demand on the West Coast Main Line route between London and Manchester will grow by around 60% between now and 2024 â&euro;&ldquo; yet even today passengers have to stand in peak periods on some long-distance journeys. Ignoring the problem is simply not an option. Severe overcrowding would spread from the peaks, to the whole of the day, and the reliability of the network would deteriorate. More passengers would be forced onto short-haul air services or onto the road network, generating ever-rising levels of carbon.</p> <h2>HS2 the answer - lessons from abroad</h2> <p>After an extensive review of the options, which is summarised in the document published today, our conclusion is that the only sustainable transport solution to these challenges is high speed rail. No other form of transport investment offers the same package of benefits. Indeed, countries across the developed world have come to the same conclusions â&euro;&ldquo; and are pressing ahead with ambitious plans for high speed rail. The UK simply cannot afford to be left behind. Across Europe and Asia, high speed rail has delivered for travellers in terms of journey times, capacity, reliability, comfort and accessibility. And it has delivered for our competitorsâ&euro;&trade; economies, the job creation, regeneration and economic benefits that we will see in the UK if we go ahead with HS2. Not to mention modal shift: Flights between Paris and Brussels have all but come to an end and air traffic between Madrid and Barcelona is in dramatic decline since the opening of high speed lines.</p> <h2>Service benefits</h2> <p>The network we are proposing today would bring central London to within 49 minutes of Birmingham; to within 73 minutes of Manchester and 80 minutes of Leeds. At least 14 services an hour in each direction would be added on the North-South route â&euro;&ldquo; each carrying more than 1,000 passengers. Transferring long distance services to the high speed line would release capacity on the existing East Coast, West Coast and Midland main lines, allowing substantially improved commuter services and new opportunities for freight. For the first time, high speed rail would deliver fast and efficient links between cities in the North and the Midlands â&euro;&ldquo; overcoming the inherent connectivity deficiencies of the current railway and its Victorian design. <em>The current rail journey from Birmingham to Leeds, for example, takes 2 hours. HS2 would cut that to 1 hour 5 minutes.</em> </p> <h2>Economic benefits</h2> <p>By connecting the West Midlands with Manchester, Sheffield and Leeds, as well as the East Midlands, high speed rail would allow them increasingly to operate as a single economic area, with the capability to compete with other economic centres across Europe. The links from HS2 onto both the West Coast and East Coast mainlines would enable high speed services to reach other destinations â&euro;&ldquo; including Newcastle, Liverpool, Glasgow and Edinburgh â&euro;&ldquo; by through running onto the existing network. High speed rail would allow the economies of the North and the Midlands to benefit more directly from the economic strength of London and the South East:  improving urban productivity, providing access to major new markets and enabling them more easily to attract the most highly skilled workers. The network would generate economic benefits of around £44 billion â&euro;&ldquo; and the first phase alone would support the creation of more than 40,000 jobs. HS2 will be good for business and good for jobs. Which is why 69 business leaders wrote to the Financial Times last week in support of our proposals for high speed rail.</p> <h2>Work so far/ mitigation</h2> <p>A huge amount of work and preparation has gone into developing the project â&euro;&ldquo; and getting to the launch of this consultation. And I would like to thank the teams in HS2 and DfT for all their hard work. More than 90 options were considered for stations and line of route sections during the process. By dividing the line up into sections, HS2 ltd developed a shortlist of seven different possible routes, which was then narrowed down to three â&euro;&ldquo; and then finally one.</p> <p>I came to this project for the first time in May. And I have asked the difficult questions; challenged the departmental conventional wisdom. I&#39;ve explored the objectors&#39; arguments and put my officials on the spot to rebut them to me. I am satisfied that what we are publishing today is a robust proposal, in which the national benefits of high speed rail will have been properly balanced against the impact on local communities. I have personally reviewed every mile of the route with HS2 engineers, looking at the stress points; challenging the alignment; exploring different approaches to mitigating the most intrusive local impacts. I have visited the whole of the line of route and the communities that will be affected by it, listening to their views.</p> <p>This painstaking process has already had a massive impact in shaping the proposal that we are launching in todayâ&euro;&trade;s consultation. Over half the route has been refined since the original recommendations of HS2 were delivered in December 2009 â&euro;&ldquo; for example adding more than a mile and a half of â&euro;&tilde;green tunnelsâ&euro;&trade; to maintain local access and minimise noise and visual impacts. We have lowered the vertical alignment of large sections of the line, reducing the amount of viaduct, and altering the line to avoid settlements and important heritage sites. We have ensured that the Chilterns will be crossed predominantly in tunnels and deep cutting and we expect to plant two million trees along the route from London to Birmingham. And for those who, despite our best efforts at mitigation, are still negatively affected, we are consulting on options for an extra-statutory scheme, offering greater protection than the statutory compensation scheme. In the meantime, we have launched an Exceptional Hardship scheme for homeowners who need to relocate urgently, and whose property values have been affected by the published route proposal.</p> <h2>What&#39;s next</h2> <p>The importance of the project is reflected in the scale of the consultation: this is one of the most comprehensive, wide-ranging and inclusive consultations Government has ever undertaken. Alongside it, we are publishing a detailed economic case and a full Appraisal of Sustainability. It is a real consultation. We want to hear the views of people from across Britain on these exciting proposals. Which means this is just the first stage in an ongoing process.</p> <p>And I guarantee this: no final decisions will be taken until everyone has had the chance to have their say. Now is the time for people to speak up and make their voices heard: Passengers, local communities, business, environmental groups. And the railway industry. Not just along the line of the first phase route â&euro;&ldquo; but across the country, here in the West Midlands, in our great Northern cities, and in Scotland. We want to hear from all of them, to help us reach the right decision, in the national interest. We will analyse the contributions, and publish our response, setting out our proposed way forward, in December 2011. If our decision is to proceed, we will aim to get a hybrid bill for the London-Birmingham route on to the statue book by 2015.</p> <h2>Concluding remarks</h2> <p>The urgent need to support economic growth <strong>and to</strong> decarbonise our economy means that the time for high speed rail in Britain has come. Today, we have set out our case for HS2. We will take that case to the regions of Britain. And weâ&euro;&trade;ll take it to the communities along the line of route. We will show how High Speed Rail can transform the face of Britain&#39;s economy â&euro;&ldquo; with more growth, more jobs and more prosperity. And we will show, too, how we will mitigate the local impacts of the proposed line. Maximising the benefits and minimising the burdens.</p> <p>We have before us a once in a lifetime opportunity. An opportunity to reshape our economic geography and secure our future with the benefits of High Speed Rail. Too often in the past, Britain has baulked at the big decisions. This time, let us look resolutely to the future and seize this prize.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-04T15:56:01.263704 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20110228 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP High Speed Rail Department for Transport 28 February 2011 2011-02-28T00:00:00 ICC, Birmingham
<p>Ladies and gentlemen.</p> <p>It is a very great pleasure to welcome you here today for the launch of our consultation into high speed rail, and where more appropriate than Birmingham; a city with a proud industrial heritage - now looking firmly to the future - to diversify and grow - as it creates the jobs of tomorrow and plans to reap the benefits of HSR.</p> <p>This will be one of the most extensive and, potentially, most far reaching government consultations in history. The proposal we are consulting on is not merely a blueprint for a new national railway, speeding passengers in huge numbers between our largest and most important conurbations in state of the art 225 mph trains, but also a vision for the future of inter-city travel in the 21st century. An investment in infrastructure to deliver the long-term growth, jobs and prosperity that Britain needs if we are to retain our place in the world league tables. A once-in-a-generation chance to reshape our economic geography; bring our key cities closer together; regenerate our urban centres; and tackle the North-South divide that has held this country back for far too long.</p> <h2>Economic Context</h2> <p>It is ten months since the new Coalition Government began tackling the debt crisis that threatened to cripple the UK for a generation, and set about rebuilding our economy after one of the longest and deepest recessions on record. But rooting out waste, reforming welfare and balancing budgets is only part of the solution to the countryâ&euro;&trade;s economic problems. The next challenge is to secure the growth, the jobs, and the investment that will lay the foundations for a stronger, more balanced, more competitive economy in the long term â&euro;&ldquo; while delivering on our climate change obligations. And infrastructure investment â&euro;&ldquo; as the Chancellor has clearly spelt out â&euro;&ldquo; will be a crucial part of answering that challenge. Over the next few years, despite the squeeze on public spending, we will invest in Crossrail, in Thameslink and in London&#39;s tube upgrades. As these projects reach completion, we need to move the focus away from London - to the infrastructure that will support the wider UK economy.</p> <h2>Origins of HS2/ the problem</h2> <p>When we became the first party to commit to high speed rail in Opposition, we recognised its potential to rebuild and rebalance the UK economy through massive improvements in journey times, in connections between cities, and in capacity. We could see that the country needed a radical and visionary solution, to tackle the road congestion and rail overcrowding that are set to become significant obstacles to economic growth, and to deal with rising demand for inter-city travel in the future. Our railways have undergone a remarkable, and welcome renaissance. Against a baseline assumption at privatisation of continued, managed decline â&euro;&ldquo; the opposite has happened. Between 1994 and 2009, the number of miles travelled by rail passengers in Britain soared â&euro;&ldquo; from 18 billion to 32 billion â&euro;&ldquo; and that growth shows no sign of slowing. Network Rail estimates that demand on the West Coast Main Line route between London and Manchester will grow by around 60% between now and 2024 â&euro;&ldquo; yet even today passengers have to stand in peak periods on some long-distance journeys. Ignoring the problem is simply not an option. Severe overcrowding would spread from the peaks, to the whole of the day, and the reliability of the network would deteriorate. More passengers would be forced onto short-haul air services or onto the road network, generating ever-rising levels of carbon.</p> <h2>HS2 the answer - lessons from abroad</h2> <p>After an extensive review of the options, which is summarised in the document published today, our conclusion is that the only sustainable transport solution to these challenges is high speed rail. No other form of transport investment offers the same package of benefits. Indeed, countries across the developed world have come to the same conclusions â&euro;&ldquo; and are pressing ahead with ambitious plans for high speed rail. The UK simply cannot afford to be left behind. Across Europe and Asia, high speed rail has delivered for travellers in terms of journey times, capacity, reliability, comfort and accessibility. And it has delivered for our competitorsâ&euro;&trade; economies, the job creation, regeneration and economic benefits that we will see in the UK if we go ahead with HS2. Not to mention modal shift: Flights between Paris and Brussels have all but come to an end and air traffic between Madrid and Barcelona is in dramatic decline since the opening of high speed lines.</p> <h2>Service benefits</h2> <p>The network we are proposing today would bring central London to within 49 minutes of Birmingham; to within 73 minutes of Manchester and 80 minutes of Leeds. At least 14 services an hour in each direction would be added on the North-South route â&euro;&ldquo; each carrying more than 1,000 passengers. Transferring long distance services to the high speed line would release capacity on the existing East Coast, West Coast and Midland main lines, allowing substantially improved commuter services and new opportunities for freight. For the first time, high speed rail would deliver fast and efficient links between cities in the North and the Midlands â&euro;&ldquo; overcoming the inherent connectivity deficiencies of the current railway and its Victorian design. <em>The current rail journey from Birmingham to Leeds, for example, takes 2 hours. HS2 would cut that to 1 hour 5 minutes.</em> </p> <h2>Economic benefits</h2> <p>By connecting the West Midlands with Manchester, Sheffield and Leeds, as well as the East Midlands, high speed rail would allow them increasingly to operate as a single economic area, with the capability to compete with other economic centres across Europe. The links from HS2 onto both the West Coast and East Coast mainlines would enable high speed services to reach other destinations â&euro;&ldquo; including Newcastle, Liverpool, Glasgow and Edinburgh â&euro;&ldquo; by through running onto the existing network. High speed rail would allow the economies of the North and the Midlands to benefit more directly from the economic strength of London and the South East:  improving urban productivity, providing access to major new markets and enabling them more easily to attract the most highly skilled workers. The network would generate economic benefits of around £44 billion â&euro;&ldquo; and the first phase alone would support the creation of more than 40,000 jobs. HS2 will be good for business and good for jobs. Which is why 69 business leaders wrote to the Financial Times last week in support of our proposals for high speed rail.</p> <h2>Work so far/ mitigation</h2> <p>A huge amount of work and preparation has gone into developing the project â&euro;&ldquo; and getting to the launch of this consultation. And I would like to thank the teams in HS2 and DfT for all their hard work. More than 90 options were considered for stations and line of route sections during the process. By dividing the line up into sections, HS2 ltd developed a shortlist of seven different possible routes, which was then narrowed down to three â&euro;&ldquo; and then finally one.</p> <p>I came to this project for the first time in May. And I have asked the difficult questions; challenged the departmental conventional wisdom. I&#39;ve explored the objectors&#39; arguments and put my officials on the spot to rebut them to me. I am satisfied that what we are publishing today is a robust proposal, in which the national benefits of high speed rail will have been properly balanced against the impact on local communities. I have personally reviewed every mile of the route with HS2 engineers, looking at the stress points; challenging the alignment; exploring different approaches to mitigating the most intrusive local impacts. I have visited the whole of the line of route and the communities that will be affected by it, listening to their views.</p> <p>This painstaking process has already had a massive impact in shaping the proposal that we are launching in todayâ&euro;&trade;s consultation. Over half the route has been refined since the original recommendations of HS2 were delivered in December 2009 â&euro;&ldquo; for example adding more than a mile and a half of â&euro;&tilde;green tunnelsâ&euro;&trade; to maintain local access and minimise noise and visual impacts. We have lowered the vertical alignment of large sections of the line, reducing the amount of viaduct, and altering the line to avoid settlements and important heritage sites. We have ensured that the Chilterns will be crossed predominantly in tunnels and deep cutting and we expect to plant two million trees along the route from London to Birmingham. And for those who, despite our best efforts at mitigation, are still negatively affected, we are consulting on options for an extra-statutory scheme, offering greater protection than the statutory compensation scheme. In the meantime, we have launched an Exceptional Hardship scheme for homeowners who need to relocate urgently, and whose property values have been affected by the published route proposal.</p> <h2>What&#39;s next</h2> <p>The importance of the project is reflected in the scale of the consultation: this is one of the most comprehensive, wide-ranging and inclusive consultations Government has ever undertaken. Alongside it, we are publishing a detailed economic case and a full Appraisal of Sustainability. It is a real consultation. We want to hear the views of people from across Britain on these exciting proposals. Which means this is just the first stage in an ongoing process.</p> <p>And I guarantee this: no final decisions will be taken until everyone has had the chance to have their say. Now is the time for people to speak up and make their voices heard: Passengers, local communities, business, environmental groups. And the railway industry. Not just along the line of the first phase route â&euro;&ldquo; but across the country, here in the West Midlands, in our great Northern cities, and in Scotland. We want to hear from all of them, to help us reach the right decision, in the national interest. We will analyse the contributions, and publish our response, setting out our proposed way forward, in December 2011. If our decision is to proceed, we will aim to get a hybrid bill for the London-Birmingham route on to the statue book by 2015.</p> <h2>Concluding remarks</h2> <p>The urgent need to support economic growth <strong>and to</strong> decarbonise our economy means that the time for high speed rail in Britain has come. Today, we have set out our case for HS2. We will take that case to the regions of Britain. And weâ&euro;&trade;ll take it to the communities along the line of route. We will show how High Speed Rail can transform the face of Britain&#39;s economy â&euro;&ldquo; with more growth, more jobs and more prosperity. And we will show, too, how we will mitigate the local impacts of the proposed line. Maximising the benefits and minimising the burdens.</p> <p>We have before us a once in a lifetime opportunity. An opportunity to reshape our economic geography and secure our future with the benefits of High Speed Rail. Too often in the past, Britain has baulked at the big decisions. This time, let us look resolutely to the future and seize this prize.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:11:23.691624 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20110228?view=Standard The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP High Speed Rail Department for Transport 28 February 2011 2011-02-28T00:00:00 ICC, Birmingham
<p>Thank you for that kind introduction Jan. This countryâ&euro;&trade;s shipping industry is, and always will be, fundamental to our prosperity and our security. I am incredibly proud to be the Maritime Minister, and I want to be here, a constructive friend to the industry.</p> <p>As we move forward together, I can already see that positive steps are being taken and real progress is being made. We have already made significant steps:</p> <ul> <li>On Light Dues, Iâ&euro;&trade;ve recently confirmed a move to full funding of Irish Lights from Irish domestic sources by 2015/16;</li> <li>On Ship to Ship Transfers, I have suspended legislation that would have pushed ships 12.1miles out from our coast.</li> </ul> <p>But there are challenges. On the issue of Equality of Pay, I will have to introduce some legislation following infraction proceedings. These will be the minimum provisions though and I will do all I can to make a level playing field across the EU. Turning to Piracy, a huge challenge and concern for our industry - I know that in reality many UK flagged ships are already employing armed guards to protect themselves. If shipping companies choose to have them, I donâ&euro;&trade;t want cowboys on ships â&euro;&ldquo; I want properly trained security companies. That is why I am looking at our guidance on this issue to give the industry support and advice if they choose to go down this route.</p> <p>On the broader economic front, this Government is tackling our inherited debt so as to create the conditions that will help private businesses, just like those you represent, to thrive. Yes, the challenges we face mean we are navigating our way through some choppy economic seas. But cutting the deficit is the best way to spark demand, spur job creation and strengthen our economy, and thatâ&euro;&trade;s why we must stick to the course we have set out. This need for growth is one of the reasons that I want to look very closely at all the trust ports round the UK to make sure that they have the right commercial ambitions to grow. The other way we will grow is to invest in our young people. That is why we have protected the SMART budget this year and want to work together with you as part of our review to find the most effective way of supporting our young trainees.</p> <p>When it comes to offshore renewables, I warmly welcome the co-operation being provided by the shipping and ports industries. It is possible to realise the full potential of this new source of clean energy in a way that does <strong>not</strong> compromise the economic viability of our shipping our ports industries, nor compromise navigational safety.</p> <p>I want to protect our seas as well so that we can have a renaissance in Coastal Shipping. We are an island nation and we need to transport more goods by sea. Working together, I truly believe that we can build that successful and sustainable future. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s what excites me about my job and thatâ&euro;&trade;s why I am incredibly proud to be your champion in Government. Itâ&euro;&trade;s also the reason, as I said at the start of my speech, that I am totally committed to partnership working. You have a Minister who is on your side and in your corner. Now, does that mean that we will always agree on every last dot and comma of shipping policy? Of course it doesnâ&euro;&trade;t. But I know that we stand on common ground and share a common cause. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why I also know that, as well as having a history of which it can be proud, Britainâ&euro;&trade;s shipping industry also has a future of which it can be confident. So I thank you for your hospitality, I thank you for listening and I look forward to working with you all in the months and years ahead.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:11:29.289827 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/penning20110211 Mike Penning MP Speech at the Chamber of Shipping Annual Dinner Department for Transport 07 February 2011 2011-02-07T00:00:00 Chamber of Shipping Annual Dinner, Hilton Hotel, London
<h2>Introductory remarks</h2> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to kick off proceedings by giving by warm welcome to one and all.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s great to see so many of you here today â&euro;&ldquo; so thank you for making the time and taking the trouble to come along, it really is appreciated.</p> <p>This event is all about listening to you - you are the experts, the people who know what works and what doesnâ&euro;&trade;t, youâ&euro;&trade;re the ones who really understand the big issues facing the sector.</p> <h2>Freight &amp; logistics organisations matter</h2> <p>Since taking up my job there is something Iâ&euro;&trade;ve come to learn pretty quickly â&euro;&ldquo; namely that this countryâ&euro;&trade;s freight and logistics organisations matter.</p> <p>The companies and operators you represent generate economic growth and drive job creation, enhance our social well-being and improve our individual quality of life.</p> <p>In its own right the UK freight and logistics sector employs well over two million people and is worth over £74 billion to the economy.</p> <p>But the sectorâ&euro;&trade;s wider social and economic importance lies in the fact that it delivers the goods and raw materials for producers and consumers, importers and exporters.</p> <p>Indeed, just try to imagine a world <span style="text-decoration: underline">without</span> freight and logistics - our shops and supermarkets would have empty shelves, our power stations would struggle to produce energy, construction projects would face severe delays, factories would grind to a halt and access to the global economy would be closed off.</p> <p>But, as we know, the sector also has significant environmental impacts. Emissions from freight transport account for around 27% of domestic transport greenhouse gas emissions and HGVs contribute to many urban air pollution â&euro;&tilde;hotspotsâ&euro;&trade;.</p> <p>We need to work together to meet the UKâ&euro;&trade;s challenging environmental targets. You know best how to manage your operations and reduce your fuel consumption and emissions; and I thank you for the work many of you in the room are doing on this within your businesses and with the Department â&euro;&ldquo; especially in areas such as lower carbon technologies, consolidation centres and freight modal choice. But we need more progress and so Iâ&euro;&trade;ll return to this challenge later in my speech.  </p> <h3>Investing in transport, investing in recovery <strong> </strong> </h3> <p>If youâ&euro;&trade;re in the freight and logistics sector then, at the core of your job, is a determination to ensure that the right thing arrives in the right place, at the right time.</p> <p>At the heart of my job is a determination to ensure that we have the transport networks, the policy frameworks and the proportionate regulations that enable you to do what you do best.</p> <p>But, of course, both of us, industry and government, are working in a new economic landscape - one thatâ&euro;&trade;s been shaped by the unsustainable levels of debt bequeathed to the Coalition when we came into office.</p> <p>So this Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s top priority is tackling the inherited fiscal crisis. From our Emergency Budget, to our Spending Review, we have taken the tough decisions needed to cut waste and control spending, repair our public finances and rebalance our national economy.</p> <p>Among those tough decisions have been ones on VAT and fuel duty â&euro;&ldquo; decisions we had to take to deal with the biggest budget deficit in the G8 and one of the worst records on debt anywhere. </p> <p>But, we understand how painful and difficult price rises at the pump are. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why the Treasury are looking at a fair fuel stabiliser.  The Chancellor has asked the Office for Budget Responsibility to undertake an assessment of the effect of oil price fluctuations on the public finances. Informed by this assessment, the Government will examine options for the design of a fair fuel stabiliser. </p> <p>So yes â&euro;&ldquo; there have been tough decisions and hard choices. But the rescue mission we have undertaken has won the confidence of the international markets and taken this country out of the danger zone. It is also creating the conditions that will help private businesses to grow, to thrive and to hire more people. </p> <p>Relative to other areas of Government spending, transport did well out of the recent Spending Review. We recognise that, by investing in transport infrastructure, we are also investing in economic recovery.</p> <p>A modern, fit for purpose transport system is also crucial for the future success of the freight and logistics sector. So while I have this opportunity Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to highlight some of the key projects, programmes and practical steps we are taking to support you and the valuable work that you do.</p> <h3> <strong>Projects, programmes and practical steps</strong> </h3> <p>We are investing in major road schemes on key freight corridors â&euro;&ldquo; for example, on the M62, M1 and M25. Moreover, the use of managed motorways technology will make all journeys more reliable.</p> <p>We are also able to support continued investment in the rail freight network to 2014, with £150 million being available from the Transport Innovation Fund for Port of Southampton and Port of Felixstowe gauge clearance; and £200 million for the Strategic Freight Network schemes.</p> <p>To improve capacity at our ports we have given consent for major container terminal developments at Bathside Bay (Harwich), Felixstowe South, Liverpool, London Gateway (Shellhaven), Teesport and the Port of Bristol.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m convinced that our proposals to invest in high speed rail will have a positive impact on the rail freight industry by freeing up much-needed space on our existing railway for freight services - for example, on the WCML to the West Midlands</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m making sure that targeted HGV enforcement remains a central plank in our overall approach to supporting the haulage industry.</p> <p>And of course weâ&euro;&trade;re introducing an HGV charging scheme to ensure that UK hauliers get a fairer deal â&euro;&ldquo; which officials will discuss with you this afternoon</p> <p>I also believe that our localism agenda provides real opportunities for you as an industry. Under the new Regional Growth Fund, £1.4 billion is available to 2013/14 to provide a mixture of support for private sector investments and basic infrastructure schemes.</p> <p>I would encourage you all to get involved in the new Local Enterprise Partnerships which we expect to play a role in taking decisions on local strategic transport priorities.</p> <h3>Cleaner, greener challenge</h3> <p>Earlier I mentioned the sectorâ&euro;&trade;s environmental impact. Well this Government is determined to back you in your efforts to meet the challenge of making freight and logistics cleaner and greener</p> <p>One example of that support is our mode shift grant support scheme, designed to assist companies with the operating costs of running rail and water freight services, where rail and water is more expensive than road.  <br />We have a confirmed budget for these grants of £20 million for 2011-12 and £19 million for 2012-13. In addition an indicative budget is in place of £19 million for both 2013-14 and 2014-15.</p> <p>Another example of support is our work with the Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership to promote and speed up the development and adoption of greener vehicle technologies and fuels for road freight movements.</p> <p>We should also shortly be consulting on increasing the length of semi trailers to 2.05m â&euro;&ldquo; and Iâ&euro;&trade;m pleased to say that you will get an opportunity today to contribute to development of this consultation.</p> <p>I welcome the progress being made to shrink the sectorâ&euro;&trade;s environmental footprint. But as Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already said, emissions from freight must fall further if we are to meet our wider climate change objectives â&euro;&ldquo; and especially emissions from road freight if road is to compete with other modes in a future low carbon economy.</p> <p>And let me be clear on this â&euro;&ldquo; the more progress the industry itself makes, the easier it will be to ease the burden of regulation on industry.</p> <p>I took the decision in October not to make eco-driving training mandatory. Instead I want to encourage and support industry-led schemes to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions.</p> <p>In 2012, I will need to review progress made by industry and re-consider the case for Government intervention. I have written to the Chief Executives of the major freight associations on the Departmentâ&euro;&trade;s Low Carbon Supply Chain group to reinforce the importance I place on this review.</p> <p>So now is the time for you to put in place measures in your business that will lessen your fuel consumption and environmental impacts â&euro;&ldquo; and to tell us about them. Today is an opportunity for you to discuss these measures with officials. And also to discuss how to cope with the challenges that our climate throws at us â&euro;&ldquo; the recent inclement weather conditions have highlighted the importance of todayâ&euro;&trade;s session on supply chain resilience.</p> <h3>Partnership working</h3> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m not just encouraged by the steady progress thatâ&euro;&trade;s being made on meeting the environmental challenges facing the sector â&euro;&ldquo; Iâ&euro;&trade;m also delighted by the partnership working that underpins it.</p> <p>I know many of you in the room have worked hard with the Department to develop joint industry-Government recently published guidance on carbon reporting. I see this guidance as a vital first step towards any industry-led action on reducing emissions and I thank you for your help in taking it from drawing board to final document.</p> <p>I also know some of you are involved with the Freight Transport Association and UK Major Ports group in considering how to take forward industry-led actions to promote greater use of rail and coastal shipping, where they are appropriate and I will be supporting your efforts to do so..</p> <h3>Conclusions</h3> <p>It just remains me to thank you again for coming along and to say that I look forward to hearing your views both in the Q&amp;A session and also when officials feed back to me the outputs of todayâ&euro;&trade;s workshops.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:11:34.956451 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/penning20110201 Mike Penning MP Speech at Listening to Industry workshop 1 February 2011 Department for Transport 01 February 2011 2011-02-01T00:00:00 Listening to Industry workshop, London
<p>Thank you for that introduction Rob.</p> <p>It&#39;s a pleasure to join you today for this important Transport Times Conference to discuss elements of the Government&#39;s approach to aviation. Two of the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s highest priorities are to tackle the debt crisis and support growth. So it is important that we have a policy framework that allows the aviation industry to flourish in a competitive global environment.</p> <p>Britain&#39;s civil aviation industry has a long and distinguished history of innovation. From the pioneering early years of the 20th century throughout its history, Britainâ&euro;&trade;s aviation industry has adapted successfully to meet many different challenges. The statistics are well known but itâ&euro;&trade;s well worth repeating some of them. Our aviation industry generates about £11 billion a year, and employs around 200,000 people. By conquering distance and bringing communities and businesses across the world closer together aviation supports hundreds of thousands of jobs elsewhere in the economy. And of course the industry stretches well beyond the passenger market to cover:</p> <ul> <li>the air freight sector</li> <li>the aerospace and engineering specialists involved in aircraft assembly and maintenance</li> <li>the legal, finance and insurance companies who support aviation related transactions</li> </ul> <p>and, of course, General Aviation, which probably accounts for around 8% of the whole commercial aviation sector&#39;s economic contribution.</p> <p>But aviationâ&euro;&trade;s success must not come at the cost of our environmental obligations. The task we face is to enable the industry to operate in a sustainable way, one that is consistent with meeting our climate change commitments, as well as reducing the impact of flying on local communities by addressing issues such as air quality and noise.</p> <p>We rejected proposals for new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted because they would have caused an unacceptable level of environmental damage particularly in relation to noise. Aviation must play its part in helping to deliver a low carbon transport system while contributing to sustainable economic growth. I am confident the industry can rise to the challenge.</p> <h2>South East Airport Taskforce</h2> <p>In the light of the decision to reject new runways at the south east&#39;s three biggest airports, it has become more important than ever to ensure that we make the best use of the capacity we have. We need to improve our airports and improve the quality of the passenger experience within those capacity constraints. To assist us in delivering those goals we established the South East Airports Taskforce.<br /> <br />The remit of the Taskforce focuses on improving the passenger experience at Gatwick, Heathrow and Stansted but I hope that its work will also help other airports address issues affecting passengers. Regional airports right across the country make a vital contribution to local economies. A key part of our approach to aviation is to seek to create the right conditions for regional airports to flourish. I believe that they also have the potential to help relieve overcrowding in the south east. So it is important that the work of the South East Airports Taskforce benefits the wider industry.</p> <p>Three of the issues under consideration are:</p> <ul> <li>border queues</li> <li>security</li> <li>and resilience.</li> </ul> <p>Taking those in turn we are working with the Home Office and the UK Border Agency on ideas for improving the way border checks for passengers are handled. Securing our border against crime, terror and illegal immigration is vital. The impressive work being done by UKBA particularly with new technology is focused on delivering this crucial policy goal in a way which minimises inconvenience for passengers.</p> <h2>Security</h2> <p>There is also some encouraging news on security. Although the tragic events in Moscow this week were an attack on the landside of the airport illustrate the threat to aviation as whole is one against which we need continuing vigilance. The UKâ&euro;&trade;s aviation security regime has performed well over the past thirty years or so and continues to do so. Nevertheless, we are analysing ways in which the regulatory framework for aviation security might be reformed with the aim of providing greater efficiency while maintaining the same high levels of passenger security or better. <br /> <br />The aviation industry told us that the system we inherited from the last Government can sometimes be too prescriptive and process-driven in its requirements. So we are working on a fresh approach that will set the industry very demanding outcomes to achieve but gives them more flexibility to work out the best and most efficient processes by which to deliver those outcomes. I believe this will enable airports to further improve security and deliver them in a more passenger-friendly and efficient way. I am confident that such an approach can enhance our ability to deliver our security goals as well as benefiting airlines, airports, staff and passengers. We propose to consult formally on reform proposals soon.</p> <h2>Resilience and capacity management</h2> <p>Turning to a third key element of the work of the Taskforce we have established a sub-group on resilience and delays which is looking at ways to make better use of existing capacity both inside and outside the terminal. This could involve improving the flow of passengers through the airport or changing the scheduling and movement of aircraft on the ground. Weâ&euro;&trade;re hoping to find collaborative solutions which see airlines and airports working more cohesively together to improve the overall journey for passengers through the airport.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;re considering the overall approach taken to capacity management. In any transport system there is a trade off between capacity and resilience. For years, the question at Heathrow was always how many more flights can be squeezed in? Arguably, insufficient regard was paid to the impact on resilience of continuing to fill up the airport ever closer to its physical capacity limits. I believe that needs to change this approach We need to tilt the balance the other way and place a much stronger focus on resilience to see if better working practices give the airport more breathing space to recover when things go wrong. Following December&#39;s severe weather the Resilience sub-group is also considering measures to improve winter preparations in parallel with the work of David Beggâ&euro;&trade;s review of the problems which occurred at Heathrow which Iâ&euro;&trade;m sure will reach some important conclusions.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ll deal slightly later in my speech with the Bill we are preparing on reform of airport regulation, but one element of that proposed reform is the introduction of a licensing system. This would give the CAA much more effective powers to check that regulated airports are preparing properly for severe weather. Weâ&euro;&trade;ll also consider whether we can learn from other areas such as the railways where emergency timetables can be introduced if extreme weather conditions look set to significantly reduce operating capacity. There canâ&euro;&trade;t be an exact read-across but other transport systems may provide a source of ideas to try to address the problem of thousands of people turning up for flights which wonâ&euro;&trade;t be able to take off.</p> <h2>Single European Sky</h2> <p>Another way to tackle delays and strengthen resilience is via the Single European Sky programme. Itâ&euro;&trade;s well known that I have a number of serious reservations about the way the EU operates. However air traffic control is an area where I am convinced that closer cooperation with our European partners would yield very significant advantages. I believe that progress on Single European Sky has real potential to reduce delays, enhance resilience, and get our airports working more efficiently.</p> <p>The SES programme has the potential to cut delays and benefit safety, cost efficiency, and environmental performance. Imposing performance obligations on navigation service providers across all Member States should provide some important benefits. The UK National Performance Plan is being prepared by the CAA and will be made available for consultation during March and April. Both the UK and Irish national plans will contain a section which identifies the contribution made by our joint Functional Airspace Block or â&euro;&oelig;FABâ&euro;?. Our FAB is the first to be operational in Europe. Itâ&euro;&trade;s already yielding real improvements in fuel consumption and emission reductions.</p> <p>In the future, I hope that the Single European Sky programme will also deliver a system which is far more resilient in the face of the industrial militancy that is a recurrent feature of air traffic control in some of our European neighbours and which can blight the holiday plans of so many travellers.</p> <h2>Airport regulation</h2> <p>Closer to home updating the framework for the economic regulation of airports provides another way in which we can improve the quality of service that airlines and passengers receive. The current model was established back in the 1980s, and both the industry and the CAA agree it is outdated. We want to replace the existing framework for setting price caps at regulated airports with a more flexible system. Rather than focusing the bulk of regulatory action on a single price review every five years  we propose to give the CAA the powers it needs to become a more responsive regulator throughout the control period. Whether itâ&euro;&trade;s security queues, passenger facilities, or aircraft stands the licence based system we propose should enhance the effectiveness of the regulator by enabling it to intervene more quickly if an airport is failing its customers. And new enforcement powers, including financial penalties, should enable the CAA to tackle poor performance more effectively.</p> <p>I believe the reforms will encourage investment in the right kind of new facilities such as better baggage handling equipment and terminal improvements that are in tune with what passengers want. Giving the CAA a primary duty to promote the interests of passenger is also an important part of the regime. But let me emphasise that this does not mean that the voice of airlines will go unheard or disregarded by the regulator. We fully recognise the importance of ensuring that the reformed system is responsive to the concerns of airlines as the direct users of airports. Itâ&euro;&trade;s very clear to me that protecting the passenger interest will often be best served by listening to the airlines whose business it is to give their customers what they want in a competitive market. I know the airline community is concerned about the decision to focus the primary duty of the new regulatory system on passengers but this is consistent with the approach in many other regulatory contexts and in the limited range of cases where the interests of airlines and their customers are not aligned it is right for the regulator to give priority to passenger concerns.</p> <p>And we <em>have</em> listened to the airlines on Labourâ&euro;&trade;s proposal to give a role to Passenger Focus in this context. Instead we are working with the CAA to build on the work of the long-standing Air Transport Users Council to create enhanced advocacy for passengers alongside a stronger consumer focus within CAA. As a substitute for the heavy handed approach of the previous Government.</p> <h2>Consumer protection</h2> <p>Consumer protection is another key area of policy that needs to be addressed. For example, the Government believes that the ATOL scheme which is supposed to protect passengers if their tour operator or travel agent goes bust needs modernising. Iâ&euro;&trade;m concerned that many consumers do not have a clear understanding of when they are covered and when they are not. The Courtsâ&euro;&trade; interpretation of a â&euro;&tilde;package holidayâ&euro;&trade; in the recent Travel Republic case has compounded this problem. Following the travel company failures in the summer we also need to consider how best to stabilise and secure the long term financial sustainability of the fund. As a starting point in October, the Civil Aviation Authority announced that it would be introducing a new certificate for each ATOL protected holiday making it easier for consumers to establish whether they are covered or not. Work is now underway to analyse what other measures are needed to make ATOL more relevant to the realities of the modern holiday market. I should also make it clear that the Government recognises that EC261 on Denied Boarding is now operating in a way that was not foreseen when the legislation was adopted. So the Department will work with the European Commission to find a more balanced solution.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>Ladies and gentlemen I&#39;ve tried this morning to give you further insight into the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s vision for aviation setting out some of our ideas for meeting the core economic, environmental and customer service challenges facing the sector. In the months ahead, we will be expanding on that vision.</p> <p>March will see my colleagues at the Treasury publish their conclusions on Air Passenger Duty. I can assure you that the DfT has contributed to Treasury work on this with analysis on the impact of aviation taxation. Weâ&euro;&trade;ve also ensured the views of different industry players have been fed into the decision-making process. I know some of you may want to press me on APD but you will appreciate that it is simply not possible for me to anticipate the Budget announcement. In the same month, the DfT will publish a scoping document posing strategic questions on the way forward for aviation. A draft policy framework will be published for consultation during 2012. I would encourage you all to take part in the consultation to help us write a new chapter for aviation policy in Britain. Aviation has often been a divisive subject in recent years. The Coalition wants to try to build a wider consensus through a more open and inclusive dialogue and better mutual understanding than the last Government achieved. That wonâ&euro;&trade;t be an easy task but with your help, I believe we can achieve it.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:11:40.841098 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20110126 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech to Transport Times Aviation Conference Department for Transport 26 January 2011 2011-01-26T00:00:00 The Transport Times 'A New Strategy for Aviation' Conference, Central London
<p>Thank you for that introduction Keith.</p> <p>Ladies and gentlemen itâ&euro;&trade;s a pleasure to be here today. The aviation sector will always enjoy strong support in Parliament. Iâ&euro;&trade;m very much aware of APAGâ&euro;&trade;s wealth of knowledge and expertise in this field - not least because of the qualified pilots you number amongst your membership. Over the past 16 years, this group has played an important role championing British aviation and holding successive Governments to account on issues affecting the sector. And you continue to make an important contribution today, as the Coalition develops a new policy framework to deliver a sustainable and successful future for aviation.</p> <p>Two of the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s highest priorities are to tackle the debt crisis and supporting growth. So it is important that we have a policy framework that allows the aviation industry to flourish in a highly competitive global market. Britainâ&euro;&trade;s civil aviation industry has a long and distinguished history of innovation. From the pioneering early years of the 20th century - throughout its history - Britainâ&euro;&trade;s aviation industry has adapted successfully to meet a host of different and difficult challenges. The statistics are well known but itâ&euro;&trade;s worth repeating some of them. Our aviation industry generates about £11 billion a year, and employs around 200,000 people. By conquering distance and bringing communities across the world closer together, aviation supports hundreds of thousands of jobs elsewhere in the economy.</p> <p>And of course the industry stretches well beyond the passenger market to cover:</p> <ul> <li>the air freight sector</li> <li>the aerospace and the engineering specialists involved in aircraft assembly and maintenance</li> <li>the legal, finance and insurance companies who support aviation related transactions</li> <li>and, not forgetting General Aviation, which probably accounts for around 8% of the commercial aviation sectorâ&euro;&trade;s economic contribution.</li> </ul> <p>The task we face is to enable the industry to operate in a sustainable way, one that is consistent with meeting our climate change commitments as well as reducing the impact of flying on local communities by addressing issues such as air quality and noise impacts on local communities. We rejected proposals for new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted because they would have caused an unacceptable level of environmental damage - particularly in relation to noise. Aviation needs to play its part in helping to deliver a low carbon transport system while contributing to sustainable economic growth.</p> <p style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong>Technological advance</strong> </p> <p>British engine and wing technology is already playing a major role in progress towards achieving this goal.  We can be proud of the fact that new aircraft like the Airbus A350 will contain so much British engineering excellence, including British wings and British engines. The Boeing 787 Dreamliner also contains lots of British engineering, including the popular Rolls Trent engines. We can be proud that UK manufacturing can still provide world beating technology. Together these new aircraft will increase efficiency for passengers, reduce emissions around airports and help address noise problems. Over the horizon I hope we can look forward to real advances on biofuels and new engine technology such as the Advanced Open Rotor which Rolls have championed for some years.</p> <p style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong>South East Airport Taskforce</strong> </p> <p>But the decision to reject new runways at the south eastâ&euro;&trade;s three biggest airports makes it more important than ever to ensure that we make the best use of the capacity we have. We need to improve our airports and we need to improve the quality of the passenger experience within the capacity constraints we face. To assist us in delivering those goals we established the South East Airports Taskforce. The remit of the Taskforce focuses on improving the passenger experience at Gatwick, Heathrow and Stansted, but I am confident that its work will also help other airports address issues affecting passengers. Regional airports right across the country make a vital contribution to local economies. A key part of our approach to aviation is to seek to create the right conditions for regional airports to flourish. So it is important that the work of the Taskforce benefits the wider industry.</p> <p>Three of the issues under consideration are:</p> <ul> <li>border queues</li> <li>security</li> <li>and resilience</li> </ul> <p>Taking those in turn, we are working with the Home Office and the UK Border Agency on ideas for improving the way border checks for passengers are handled. Securing our border against crime, terror and illegal immigration is vital in the dangerous times we live in. The impressive work being done by UKBA, particularly with new technology, is focused on delivering this crucial policy goal in a way which minimises inconvenience for passengers.</p> <p style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong>Security</strong> </p> <p>There is also some encouraging news on security. Although the tragic events in Moscow recently were aimed at the landside of the airport, the threat to aviation as a whole is one against which we need continuing vigilance. The UKâ&euro;&trade;s aviation security regime has performed well over the past thirty years or so and continues to do so. Nevertheless, we are analysing ways in which the regulatory framework for aviation security could be reformed with the aim of providing greater efficiency, while maintaining the same high levels of passenger security or better.</p> <p>The aviation industry told us that system we inherited from the last Government can sometimes be too prescriptive and process-driven in its requirements. So we are working on a fresh approach that will set the industry very demanding outcomes to achieve, but gives them more flexibility to work out the best and most efficient processes by which to deliver those outcomes. I believe this will enable airports to further improve security and do so in a more passenger-friendly and efficient way. I am confident that such an approach can enhance our ability to deliver our security goals as well as benefiting airlines, airports, staff and passengers. We propose to consult soon on our reform proposals.</p> <p style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong>Resilience and capacity management</strong> </p> <p>Turning to a third key element of the work of the Taskforce we have established a sub-group on resilience and delays which is looking at ways to make better use of existing capacity both inside and outside the terminal. This could involve improving the flow of passengers through the airport or changing the scheduling and movement of aircraft on the ground. Weâ&euro;&trade;re hoping to find collaborative solutions which see airlines and airports in working more cohesively together to improve the overall journey through the airport. Weâ&euro;&trade;re considering the overall approach taken to capacity management. In any transport system there is a trade off between capacity and resilience. For years, the question at Heathrow was always how many more flights can be squeezed in? Arguably, insufficient regard was paid to the impact on resilience of continuing to fill up the airport ever closer to its physical capacity limits. I believe that needs to change. We need to tilt the balance the other way and place a much stronger focus on resilience to see if better working practices give the airport more breathing space to recover when things go wrong. Following Decemberâ&euro;&trade;s severe weather the Resilience sub-group is also considering measures to improve winter preparations. The licensing system we propose to introduce could give the CAA much more effective power to check that regulated airports are preparing properly for severe weather.</p> <p style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong>Airport regulation</strong> </p> <p>But there are a number of ways in which we expect our reforms of airport regulation to improve the quality of service that airlines and passengers receive. We want to replace the existing framework for setting price caps at regulated airports with a more flexible system. Rather than focusing the bulk of regulatory action on a single price review every five years we propose to give the CAA the powers it needs to become a more responsive regulator <em>throughout</em> the control period. Whether itâ&euro;&trade;s security queues, passenger facilities, or aircraft stands the licence based system we propose should enhance the effectiveness of the regulator by enabling it to intervene more quickly if an airport is failing its customers. And new enforcement powers, including financial penalties, should enable the CAA to tackle poor performance more effectively. An important part of the regime is giving the CAA a primary duty to promote the interests of passengers. But let me emphasise that this does not mean that the voice of airlines will go unheard or disregarded by the regulator. I fully recognise the importance of ensuring that the reformed system is responsive to the concerns of airlines as the direct users of airports. Itâ&euro;&trade;s very clear to me that protecting the passenger interest will often be best served by listening to the airlines whose business it is to give their customers what they want in a highly competitive market. I know the airline community is concerned about the decision to focus the new regulatory system on end users - passengers - but this is consistent with the approach in many other regulatory contexts, and in the limited range of cases where the interests of airlines and their customers are not aligned I believe it is right for the regulator to give priority to passenger concerns.</p> <p style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong>General Aviation</strong> </p> <p>I was asked today to focus on the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s overall approach to the aviation sector as a whole. However, no speech to the Air League would be complete without reference to General and Business Aviation. Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already acknowledged the economic significance of GA. But I also fully recognise that GAâ&euro;&trade;s contribution to aviation goes beyond the merely economic. It provides thousands of enthusiasts the chance to enjoy their passion for flying, providing world class training for pilots, technicians and many other roles and inspires many youngsters to take up a career in the aviation business. So I fully appreciate the importance of ensuring our policy and regulatory framework for aviation deals with GA in a proportionate way. While some issues and standards will clearly cut across the whole of the aviation sector, there will be other areas where a one-size-fits-all approach would have an unfair and disproportionate impact on General and Business Aviation. So we engaged with Ofcom when their proposals on spectrum pricing looked set to impose a very heavy burden on GA. While the outcome still involves additional charges, they are far more modest than the initial proposals and reflect the fact that GA concerns have been heard and acted on.</p> <p>After discussions with the Parliamentary Aviatorsâ&euro;&trade; Group, I wrote formally to my DCLG colleagues emphasising the importance of small airfields. My goal was to make sure the transport benefits of these facilities were properly taken on board in the planning system. I would urge this group and others interested in GA to engage with the Department for Communities as they take forward their plans on reforming the planning system.</p> <p>This is a useful opportunity for voices to be heard. And Iâ&euro;&trade;ve been hassling my officials on the new EASA rules on pilot qualification. The decision to require US registered pilots to obtain a licence from an EU member state was taken by the previous Government. Iâ&euro;&trade;m afraid this was a fait accompli before I arrived as Aviation Minister. But I want to assure you that weâ&euro;&trade;re doing what we can to minimise any unnecessary bureaucracy and to give pilots sufficient time to comply with the new rules. And lastly on GA matters, I should mention that I will shortly be writing to Siim Kallas who covers transport for the European Commission about the importance of GA. The Commissionâ&euro;&trade;s 2007 communication on General and Business Aviation contained much that was welcomed by the GA community. The response of the European Parliament was also positive. The point I want to make to Commissioner Kallas is that weâ&euro;&trade;ve yet to see the good intentions laid out in those documents manifest themselves in practical application. In particular, the EU institutions should take more seriously the need to properly assess the differential impact that new regulations can have on General Aviation and to ensure that a proportionate approach is adopted reflecting the specific characteristics of the sector. To persuade the Commission that a one-size-fits-all approach across the sector is not always the best one.</p> <p style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong> <br />Conclusion</strong> </p> <p>Ladies and gentlemen, Iâ&euro;&trade;ve tried this morning to give you further insight into the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s vision for aviation, setting out some of our ideas for meeting the core economic, environmental and customer service challenges facing the aviation sector. In the months ahead, we will be expanding on that vision. March will see my colleagues at the Treasury publish their conclusions on Air Passenger Duty. I can assure you that the DfT has contributed to Treasury work on this with analysis on the impact of aviation taxation. Weâ&euro;&trade;ve also tried to ensured the views of different industry players have been fed into the decision-making process. In the same month, the DfT will publish a scoping document posing strategic questions on the way forward for aviation. A draft policy framework will be published for consultation during 2012. I look forward to working with the Parliamentary Aerospace group to help us write a new chapter for aviation policy in Britain. Aviation has often been a divisive subject in recent years, all too often portrayed as a battle between two polarised extremes. The Coalition wants to try to build a wider consensus through a more open and inclusive dialogue and better mutual understanding than the last Government achieved. That wonâ&euro;&trade;t be an easy task, but with your help, I believe we can achieve it.</p> <p>Thank you</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:11:46.835997 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20110126b The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech to the Associate Parliamentary Aerospace Group Department for Transport 26 January 2011 2011-01-26T00:00:00 Associate Parliamentary Aerospace Group, London
<p>Thank you for that kind introduction</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m delighted to be here today to set out some of the Government ideas on airports and aviation.</p> <p>Events such as this one are always a useful reminder of the unique contribution the aviation industry makes to our economy and to our daily lives.</p> <p>Our airports, airlines and associated industries generate billions of pounds worth of economic output for the UK.</p> <p>They are a catalyst for growth, creating and supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs.</p> <p>Aviation has broadened our horizons and shrunk our worldâ&euro;¦.bringing people, communities and countries closer together than ever before.</p> <h3>Testing times</h3> <p>And it is beyond any question that aviation has been through testing times over recent years.</p> <p>Grappling with fluctuating oil prices and the global recession is one thing â&euro;¦.</p> <p>â&euro;¦. but I suspect few in the industry could have predicted that an Icelandic volcano would add to their woes as Eyja-fyalla-yokull blasted ash into the atmosphere across Europe last April.</p> <p>Add to that the long running and intense debate on the local and global environmental impacts of aviation â&euro;¦ and itâ&euro;&trade;s clear that the industry faces a formidable set of challenges.</p> <p>I am certain no one here would dispute the fact that international travel provides a hugely positive contribution to the quality of life of millions of families in the UK.</p> <p>But nor can there be any doubt that the local environmental impact of aviation â&euro;¦ such as noise â&euro;¦ can have a corrosive impact on quality of life for those under the flightpath.</p> <p>The task we face today is to find a way to enable the aviation industry to deliver the benefits we want in a sustainable way â&euro;¦ with reduced environmental impacts.</p> <p>With our decision to reject new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stanted â&euro;¦ we need to start a new chapter in the history of aviation â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ one that promotes a competitive industry â&euro;¦ supporting UK economic growth .. while recognising the need for restraint.</p> <p>We need to find a way to create the right conditions for aviation to flourish within a capacity constrained environment.</p> <p>Key to achieving that is making the best use of the capacity we have and improving the quality of the passenger experience at UK airports.</p> <h3>Environmental impact</h3> <p>On the environmental side â&euro;¦ Iâ&euro;&trade;m pleased to say that real advances are being made.</p> <p>Airports, airlines, air traffic managers and manufacturers are working together to develop new ways to mitigate the environmental impact of aviation.</p> <p>New aircraft are getting steadily quieter â&euro;¦ and more fuel-efficient.</p> <p>Progress is being made on improving operating practices to reduce fuel consumption.</p> <p>And research on sustainable biofuels is producing some striking results.</p> <p> <br />But the scale and urgency of action required means that multilateral measures like ETS also have a pivotal part to play. </p> <p>APD reform can also help â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ and let me make it clear that our goal on APD is to deliver the change we need without imposing excessive and disproportionate burdens on the industry or their customers.</p> <p>But the Coalition will continue to press for the global action and global solutions we need to successfully address aviationâ&euro;&trade;s climate change impacts.</p> <h3>Three stages</h3> <p>Today Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to outline some of the key projects we are undertaking to deliver the new chapter in aviation policy weâ&euro;&trade;ve promised.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ll take three core stages in turn â&euro;¦. early priorities for the next few months â&euro;¦. then medium and longer term initiatives.</p> <h3> <br />Early priorities - SEAT</h3> <p>To help us deliver early progress on some key aviation issues â&euro;¦ we have established the South East Airports Taskforce.</p> <p>Its remit covers measures to improve the passenger experience at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted.<br /> <br />But Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to emphasise that while the Taskforce is focused on the big airports in the south east â&euro;¦ the Government fully recognises the vital importance of regional airports right across the country.</p> <p>They can be vital economic drivers for the regions they serve â&euro;¦.. providing crucial connectivity and helping to support local businesses.</p> <p> <br />A key part of our approach to aviation is to seek to create the right conditions for regional airports to flourish.</p> <p>We believe that they have a valuable part to play in delivering the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s commitment to rebalancing our economy and reduce the prosperity gap between north and south.</p> <p>They also have the potential to help relieve overcrowding at south east airports.</p> <p>Turning back to the Taskforce â&euro;¦ Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to consider three of its key workstreams:</p> <p>â&euro;¦ resilience and delays,</p> <p>â&euro;¦ border controls</p> <p>â&euro;¦ and security.</p> <h3>Resilience and delays</h3> <p>Clearly the decision we have made to reject new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted makes it more important than ever that we use the capacity we have in an efficient way.</p> <p>So I have asked the Civil Aviation Authority to work with Taskforce members to explore what further measures might be taken to improve the overall performance of these airports within their existing capacity limits.</p> <p>Aspects of this work cover â&euro;¦ for example â&euro;¦ performance management issues such as scheduling and movement of aircraft on the ground.</p> <p>The group is also looking at ways to use terminal capacity more efficiently to help improve flows through the airport.</p> <h3>Border controls</h3> <p>Another recurrent topic in the Taskforce is border control.</p> <p>Industry representatives continue to express their concerns about long queues for people arriving in the UK.</p> <p>I gather that these concerns were highlighted once again by Baroness Valentine in her speech earlier today.</p> <p>Well let me make it clear that I understand these concerns and I believe it is very important that improvements are made.</p> <p>Securing our borders is vital if we are to combat illegal immigration and turn away criminals seeking to come to Britain.</p> <p>But we also recognise the importance of providing an efficient system for processing passengers.</p> <p>Nor do we under-estimate the impact first impressions can have on visitors arriving in the UK.</p> <p> <br />So the Department is working with the Home Office and the Borders and Immigration Agency to find workable solutions here.</p> <p>Technological advance provides real cause for optimism here.</p> <p>For example, electronic gates that will accept the new generation of chipped passports have real potential to improve performance.</p> <p>And the advance provision of electronic passenger information could allow whole flights to be cleared with only limited checks needed on arrival. </p> <h3>Security</h3> <p>A third key issue for the Taskforce is security â&euro;¦ working alongside the invaluable input from the Departmentâ&euro;&trade;s wider industry group the National Aviation Security Committee.</p> <p>Now there are certainly a few political challenges to be negotiated in this context.</p> <p>The tension faced by policy-makers is neatly illustrated by two quotes from the Sun newspaper from just a few weeks ago.</p> <p>On 28th October â&euro;¦ in the wake of Martin Broughtonâ&euro;&trade;s comments on security checks, the paperâ&euro;&trade;s editorial said: </p> <p>â&euro;&oelig;many will agree with BA chairman Martin Broughton, who says our airport security checks have got out of hand.â&euro;?</p> <p>That was followed just three days later â&euro;¦ after the cargo bomb plot was uncovered, the Sun said:</p> <p>â&euro;&oelig;Stay strong:  â&euro;&oelig;this is not the time for police to heed the calls of disgruntled airline bosses or holiday-makers by relaxing airport checks.â&euro;?   <br /> </p> <p>Thereâ&euro;&trade;s no doubt that the recent cargo bomb plot provided yet another illustration of the ever-present threat posed by terrorists and the continuing Al Quaeda focus on aviation.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to pay tribute to the people in our police and security services, in Transec and in industry who work tirelessly every day to keep flying safe and secure.</p> <p>And let me make it clear â&euro;¦ security of passengers will always be paramount.</p> <p>We will not compromise the high standards of security that are currently delivered.</p> <p>However, the Coalition recognises that the aviation industry has been arguing for some time that the regulatory framework for aviation security needs reform.</p> <p>We agree that changing the way aviation security is delivered could yield greater efficiency without compromising passenger security.</p> <p>We inherited a system from the previous Government that mandates highly detailed processes for delivering aviation security standards. </p> <p> <br />We are working on a fresh approach â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ one where the Government concentrates on setting rigorous security outcomes to be achieved â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ but gives industry much more flexibility to devise the processes which will deliver those outcomes in the most efficient and passenger-friendly way.</p> <p>In the safety field the aviation industry has achieved outstanding results in developing safe systems and inculcating a highly effective safety culture.</p> <p>We believe we can draw on that experience in improving aviation security.</p> <p> <br />I believe a move to outcome-focused â&euro;¦ risk-based regulation will enable the industry, not just to maintain current high standards in security, but to improve them still further.</p> <p>And I believe the new approach will enable these results to be delivered more efficiently with benefits for airlines, airports and passengers.</p> <p>We propose to consult formally on reform proposals early in the New Year.</p> <h3>Consumer protection</h3> <p>The remaining issue Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to look at as part of our programme of work on early priorities is reforming consumer protection.</p> <p>Protecting consumer interests is an important goal in itself â&euro;¦. but itâ&euro;&trade;s also the case that measures which enhance consumer confidence in international travel can have a positive impact on the aviation industry.</p> <p>The Government believes that the ATOL scheme which is supposed to protect passengers if their tour operator or travel agent goes bust must be modernised.</p> <p>Our aims are threefold:</p> <p>â&euro;¦ to adapt the scheme to catch up with the realities of todayâ&euro;&trade;s complex holiday market.</p> <p>â&euro;¦ to provide much greater clarity to consumers on when they are protected ...</p> <p>â&euro;¦ and to secure the financial sustainability of the fund.</p> <p>In particular â&euro;¦ we recognise the urgent need to address the loophole in the scheme revealed by the Travel Republic.</p> <p>The result of this legal judgement is that products which look almost exactly like package holidays can be sold in such a way as to fall outside the ATOL scheme.</p> <p>This leaves holiday-makers unprotected and the financial sustainability of the fund under threat.</p> <p>We expect to be making an announcement early next year on how we propose to address this issue.</p> <p>Turning to another aspect of consumer protection â&euro;¦ I recognise that EC261 is now operating in a way that was simply not foreseen when the legislation was adopted.</p> <p>In particular, the Sturgeon judgment that equates a 3 hour delay with a cancellation and consequently mandates high pay-outs is difficult to reconcile with holding a fair balance between industry and customer.</p> <p>My colleague, the Secretary of State, raised this at his very first attendance at the Council of Ministers â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ and the Department is continuing to work with the Commission on a way forward on this.</p> <p>That said â&euro;¦ the slow pace of legislative change in the EU means that this issue is one that blends into the next section of my speech â&euro;¦ namely medium term projects.</p> <p>But there can be no doubt that change is needed.</p> <h3>Medium term</h3> <p>Our medium term priorities include progress on the Single European Sky project which has significant potential to cut down on delays, improve resilience and see our airports working better.</p> <p>But the centre-piece of our medium term work is modernisation of the framework for economic regulation of airports. </p> <p>We signalled our intention to legislation in this area in the Queenâ&euro;&trade;s speech.</p> <p>The current airport economic regulation model was established back in the 1980s.</p> <p>Both the industry and the CAA agree it is out-dated and in need of reform.  </p> <p>So we want to replace the existing framework for setting price caps at regulated airports with a more flexible system.</p> <p> <br />Rather than focusing the bulk of regulatory action on a single price review every few years â&euro;¦ we want to give the CAA the powers it needs to become a more responsive regulator throughout the regulatory control period.</p> <p>Whether itâ&euro;&trade;s security queues, passenger facilities, or aircraft stands ...</p> <p>â&euro;¦ the licence based system we propose should to enable to regulator to become much more activist in intervening where an airport is failing its customers.</p> <p>New enforcement powers including financial penalties should enable the CAA to tackle poor performance more effectively.</p> <p>As well as encouraging improvements to the way airports operate â&euro;¦ we believe the new regime should incentivise investment in the right kind of new facilities â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦. such as better baggage handling equipment and terminal improvements that are in tune with what passengers want.</p> <p>A key part of our reform package involves giving the CAA a new primary duty to promote the interests of passengers.</p> <p>But let me emphasise that this does not mean that the voice of airlines will go unheard or disregarded by the regulator.</p> <p>I fully recognise the importance of ensuring that the reformed system is responsive to the concerns of airlines as the direct users of airports.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s crystal clear to me that protecting the passenger interest will often be best served by listening to the airlines whose business it is to give their customers what they want.</p> <p>I know the airline community is concerned about the decision to focus the new regulatory system on passengers â&euro;¦ ie the end-user of airports â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ but this is consistent with the regime in operation in other regulatory contexts â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ and I really donâ&euro;&trade;t think it is unreasonable to ask the regulator to give priority to passenger interests in the limited range of cases where the interests of airlines and their customers are not aligned.</p> <p>And we have listened to industry concerns on Labourâ&euro;&trade;s proposal to give a role to Passenger Focus.</p> <p>Instead we are working with the CAA to build on the work of the long-standing Air Transport Users Council â&euro;¦ to create enhanced advocacy for passengers alongside a stronger consumer focus within CAA.</p> <h3>Longer Term/Conclusion</h3> <p>In my concluding remarks this afternoon, Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to outline our longer term plans for delivering a successful and sustainable aviation industry.</p> <p>Next Spring, the DfT will issue a scoping document setting out the key issues we are seeking to address in our overall strategy for aviation â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ a strategy to support economic growth, protect Heathrowâ&euro;&trade;s status as a highly successful global hub and addresses aviationâ&euro;&trade;s environmental impacts.</p> <p>We will then open up a dialogue with a wide range of stakeholders to seek their views and to draw on their knowledge and experience.</p> <p>Our intention is to publish a draft policy document for formal consultation early in 2012 â&euro;¦ with a view to adopting our new aviation strategy in 2013.<br /> <br />Across the board on aviation â&euro;¦ the Coalition is already engaging on multiple levels and in many different ways with a range of stakeholders â&euro;¦ including the airports, aviation and aerospace industries.</p> <p>As we move forward in developing our more detailed strategy â&euro;¦ your input will be invaluable â&euro;¦ alongside that of a host of interested parties who care passionately about the decisions we will be making â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ like community groups, environmentalists, local authorities, business organisations and passengers.</p> <p>We want this to be a very open and inclusive process.</p> <p>Input from all of these diverse interests and perspectives will be hugely beneficial in helping us get the right answers on aviation â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ answers which improve connectivity, generate prosperity and continue to provide millions of people with the benefits that travel abroad can bring â&euro;¦</p> <p>â&euro;¦ but do so in a way which does not impose an unacceptable cost in terms of our environment or our quality of life.<br /> <br />I do not under-estimate how difficult this task will be but it is vital that we achieve it.</p> <p>And letâ&euro;&trade;s remember that itâ&euro;&trade;s barely a hundred or so years since the Wright brothers first risked life and limb by taking to the skies in box shaped bi-planes made of spruce and kept aloft with 12 horse power engines.</p> <p>During that period â&euro;¦ Britainâ&euro;&trade;s world beating aviation and aerospace industries have solved many seemingly intractable problems.</p> <p>I have every confidence that by working together â&euro;¦ we can do so again.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:11:52.414076 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villers20101214 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech for Eversheds Aviation Seminar Department for Transport 14 December 2010 2010-12-14T00:00:00 Eversheds Aviation Seminar
<p>It is a privilege to be here today to talk to experts who are so passionate about improving road safety.</p> <p>I was in St Petersburg recently, and had the honour of saying how well the UK has done on road safety, but there is still more to do.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve been a fireman and seen carnage on the roads. Iâ&euro;&trade;ve also been a biker and held an HGV licence, so it is a real honour to be road safety Minister.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;re approaching Christmas now, and there will be carnage caused by drink and drugs at this time of year. I am passionate about solving those problems. There are those who will never listen â&euro;&ldquo; but I want to send a message that we will catch you, you will lose your licence, be fined up to £5000 and become a pariah.</p> <p>We need to target the younger audience of 17 â&euro;&ldquo; 25 year olds who were not around during the first wave of anti-drink driving campaigns. They need to know that if they are over the limit, they will go to the cells, they will lose their licences and possibly their jobs.</p> <p>We have to get the message through.</p> <p>With regard to drugs, it is a real problem in our community â&euro;&ldquo; people do drug drive.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve been at the roadside cutting people out of cars who have been on drugs.</p> <p>We donâ&euro;&trade;t have the technology to be able to arrest people for drug driving at the roadside at the moment. But by 2012 we will have roadside drug testing.</p> <p>We also need to look at driver education. Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already announced changes to the driving test. I want people to have freedom and to enjoy driving, but safely. My daughters, for example, were taught to pass a test, rather than to be good drivers. I will work with people like you at the IAM to improve advanced driver training, such as motorway driving lessons.</p> <p>I am a passionate biker, but itâ&euro;&trade;s very dangerous. There was a 4% increase in motorcyclists killed or seriously injured last year.</p> <p>I am carrying out a review of the motorcycle test â&euro;&ldquo; itâ&euro;&trade;s not fit for purpose as it is. People should not be riding for 2 hours to take a test off road, fail that test and then be allowed to ride 2 hours home again. I want as much of the test as possible to be conducted on the road.</p> <p>I want all motoring tests (car, motorcycle, MOT) to be fit for purpose.</p> <p>We need to look at safety measures. The fact that money for speed cameras is no longer ringfenced does not mean that cameras are not useful â&euro;&ldquo; in the right circumstances they can really work, but they are not the only option. We need to make sure that we have the most effective, appropriate technology for each individual location â&euro;&ldquo; this could be something as simple as white lines, for example on rural roads, white lines being painted on the outside edges was proven to increase safety. A simple, but cheap, measure.</p> <p>Sadly I have to leave to return to Parliament, but it really is a privilege to be road safety Minister, and you can be assured that this Government is passionate about road safety.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:11:59.186341 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/penning20101209 Mike Penning MP Speech at the Institute of Advanced Motorists Annual Lunch Department for Transport 09 December 2010 2010-12-09T00:00:00 Institute of Advanced Motorists Annual Lunch, Landmark Hotel, London
<p>Thanks, in no small part to the RFG and your excellent chairman, there was one thing I learnt very quickly on taking on the transport brief 3 years ago -  that getting it right for passengers isnâ&euro;&trade;t enough.Rail freight matters too.</p> <p>It matters economically, socially and environmentally.</p> <p>And no Government should under-estimate the importance of getting the balance right between freight and passenger services.</p> <p>As everyone here will know, the country would quickly grind to a halt without the logistics industry to pump the life blood of modern â&euro;&tilde;just-in-timeâ&euro;&trade; capitalism round the veins and arteries of the nation.</p> <p>Without the rail freight industry and your competitors in road haulage thereâ&euro;&trade;d be no food on our tables and no fuel at our power stations.</p> <p>Yes, the interest of the travelling public is served by improving passenger rail.</p> <p>But those same passengers receive crucially important benefits with a transfer of goods from road to rail - benefits like taking lorries off our congested motorways, improving air quality and saving lives on the roads.</p> <p>The rail freight industry has been one of the real success stories of privatisation with substantial private sector investment.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;m pleased too that the MSRS Modal Shift grants have survived the CSR.<br /> <br />I know how valuable they are to the industry in encouraging mode shift from road to rail.</p> <p>Even when the pressing need to tackle the deficit weâ&euro;&trade;ve inherited places severe pressure on spending right across Government, we have tried to safeguard programmes which will support our commitments on climate change.</p> <p>And I firmly believe that helping rail freight compete with road haulage can play a valuable role in our efforts to cut carbon and address congestion.</p> <p>Rail freight investment</p> <p>Acknowledging good deeds by your predecessors is not always a fashionable thing for politicians to do â&euro;&ldquo; but  I have always tried to give the last administration real credit for the quality of the work they did on the Strategic Freight Network.</p> <p>They engaged well with industry to identify the improvements that can do most to improve the climate for rail freight and open up more opportunities for to grow the sector.</p> <p>And during the long weeks of negotiations on the CSR Iâ&euro;&trade;m certain I bored my colleagues to death by going on and on about the importance of the Felixstowe-Nuneaton and Southampton to the West Coast Mainline upgrade programmes.<br /> <br />It was a huge relief when the Chancellor confirmed that these vital projects would continue.</p> <p>The reality is that George Osborne decided to place a priority on transport capital spending in the CSR because the Coalition accepts that transport infrastructure projects can be some of the best value investments that the taxpayer can make - providing economic benefits many times their cost.</p> <p>So rail has emerged from the Spending Review in a far stronger position than most people expected, far stronger than I expected.</p> <p>We all know that the recurrent pattern of spending squeezes in years past was to cancel capital projects, with rail and roads often the first to suffer.</p> <p>Well that hasnâ&euro;&trade;t happened this time round.<br />In Opposition, we promised to focus on the long term national interest not short term politics.</p> <p>Reform</p> <p>As important as they are, building a successful future for our railways isnâ&euro;&trade;t only about big infrastructure projects.</p> <p>It is also about delivering effective reform.</p> <p>Reform is essential if weâ&euro;&trade;re to deliver a financially sustainable future for the railways.</p> <p>The interim report published this week by Sir Roy McNulty confirms that railways in the UK are more costly to build, less efficient to maintain and more expensive to use than many of their continental counterparts.</p> <p>If we are to deliver the capacity upgrades and service improvements that rail users want then costs simply have to come down.</p> <p>And let me make it very clear - an essential component of a successful reform is delivering an infrastructure provider thatâ&euro;&trade;s responsive to its customers, both freight and passenger operators.</p> <p>The Mcnulty study indicates that better alignment of incentives between train operators and Network Rail could deliver significant savings.</p> <p>I fully agree that getting those responsible for managing track and train working more closely together  - and ensuring they have a shared interest in reducing costs -  could form an important part of a successful reform.</p> <p>But let me make it clear as I conclude my remarks today, in taking forward work to align of incentives in the rail industry in the way the McNulty report recommends, we will have full regard to the interests of the freight sector.</p> <p>The RFG will see to that!</p> <p>Tony Berkeley is my rail freight conscience!</p> <p>In his statement to Parliament responding to the interim study, the Secretary of State explicitly stated that the changes we are proposing must protect the interests of freight users.</p> <p>We want to build on Sir Royâ&euro;&trade;s study - to deliver better value for money for passengers, for taxpayers and for freight operators and their customers.</p> <p>And I look forward to working with your industry to take forward that shared goal.</p> <p>So, without further ado, it simply remains for me to thank you for listening to my speech today and to wish you all a very Merry Christmas.</p> <p>And, if precedent is anything to go by, this lunch will provide an extremely merry start to the festive season!</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:11.974880 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20101208 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech to Rail Freight Group Christmas Lunch Department for Transport 08 December 2010 2010-12-08T00:00:00 Rail Freight Group Christmas Lunch
<p>Thank you for that introduction Patrick. Itâ&euro;&trade;s great to be here at the NEC today talking about our plans for high speed rail. Before we start our panel discussion, I want to talk to you about the bigger picture for HS2. And the political context of the project. The central role it plays in the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s transport strategy. The huge benefits I believe it can bring to the West Midlands, this country as a whole, and British business in particular. How it fits into our wider agenda for rebalancing and rebuilding Britainâ&euro;&trade;s economy. Why - even in a period of fiscal austerity - we are committed to pursuing such a huge investment. But, also the very strong opposition which will be articulated against the project and the importance of the business lobby in making the case for High Speed Rail.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Economic Context</strong> <strong> <br /> </strong>Let me first of all set the economic backdrop: As business people, you donâ&euro;&trade;t need me to tell you that we faced an unprecedented fiscal crisis when we came to office. We were saddled with the biggest budget deficit in the G20 and had just limped out of the longest and deepest recession in our peacetime history. Every single day we were adding £400 million to our national debt. Had we kept to the spending plans we inherited, we would be paying out nearly £70 billion a year in interest alone by the end of the Parliament - more than we spend on schooling our children and defending our country combined. If weâ&euro;&trade;d let those debts go on rising, it would have led to higher interest rates, undermined confidence in Britain and put the recovery at risk. So we have had to take tough decisions to get the deficit under control. By cancelling £6 billion worth of planned public spending this year. By setting out, in our Emergency Budget in June, an ambitious four year plan to eliminate entirely our structural deficit and get debt falling as a percentage of GDP. And by delivering the conclusions of the Spending Review, with firm and fixed spending totals for each government department for the rest of this Parliament, and far-reaching reforms to welfare and our public services. Our early action to balance Britainâ&euro;&trade;s books is already paying dividends. Our AAA credit rating has been reconfirmed and we now have a clean bill of health from the IMF - who described our budget as â&euro;&tilde;essentialâ&euro;&trade; to securing the conditions for sustainable economic growth. But of course, that vital fiscal readjustment is only part of the story.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Growth and importance of infrastructure investment<br /> </strong>The next challenge is to secure the growth, the jobs, the investment that will drive our prosperity in the future. We must now lay the foundations for building a strong, competitive, balanced economy for the longer term, while delivering on our climate change obligations. And infrastructure investment â&euro;&ldquo; as the Chancellor has clearly spelt out - will be a key part of our approach. We will not repeat past mistakes where governments spent too much and invested too little. Or of indiscriminately cutting infrastructure investment - previously seen as the easy option behind which countless governments, of all persuasions, have sheltered from taking the tough decisions on current spending, and on welfare in particular. The settlement Transport received in the Spending Review - £18 billion of rail investments; £4 billion in Highways Agency investment, and £6 billion on local transport investments - demonstrates the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s commitment to prioritising the projects that will support economic growth and job creation. That settlement also included over £750 million to fund the development of our plans for a national high speed rail network over the Spending Review period, with the bulk of capital expenditure occurring after 2015 - when, on our plans, the public finances will be back in balance. And today I want to explain why I believe high speed rail can make a critical contribution to our economic future. And talk through the processes and the politics that lie ahead.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>The Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s transport strategy<br /> </strong>When I took over this brief, the challenge was clear: with limited resources to support economic growth and rebalancing, and deliver on the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s climate change agenda. The need for a cross-modal approach was obvious. For instance, our decision to reject new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted because of local environmental impacts and CO2 concerns, coupled with the need to ensure that the scarce capacity at our international airports is available for the medium- and long-haul routes that are vital to our economic success, inevitably points to modal shift on domestic and short-haul European travel. The success of high speed rail across Europe has shown how effectively such links can cater for journeys that had previously been dominated by aviation. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why our commitment to a high speed rail network has been a key factor in taking the difficult decisions we have taken on additional capacity at London&#39;s airports. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why we have said from the outset that a meaningful High Speed Rail network must include a link to our principal gateway airport and to the HS1 line to the Channel Tunnel. But high speed rail isnâ&euro;&trade;t just about modal shift. Itâ&euro;&trade;s also about addressing the rail capacity challenges that are facing our most congested inter-urban routes. Reducing crowding, improving reliability, speeding up journeys, and catering for the increased demand that comes from continued economic growth. And, of course, it is not only inter-city journeys that would benefit from a new high speed line. As long distance point to point services transfer to the new line, valuable capacity is released to meet the growing demand for longer-distance commuter travel, for services to intermediate towns and for freight on the East and West Coast mainlines. High speed rail will be an unbeatable option for inter-urban travel. With none of the hassle of short-haul flying. And even the greatest petrol-head could not realistically contemplate a 49 minute London to Birmingham journey â&euro;&ldquo; and if he did, heâ&euro;&trade;d probably need another 49 minutes to find somewhere to park!</p> <p> <strong>The role of high-speed rail in delivering the Government&#39;s growth strategy<br /> </strong>But high speed rail isnâ&euro;&trade;t just a central plank of our transport strategy. It is also vital to our wider plans for securing sustainable economic growth.<br />In the short-term it has the potential to create thousands of jobs planning, constructing and operating the proposed line. A fifteen to twenty year programme to roll-out new high speed rail lines, on which construction would begin as Crossrail is completed, would also form part of a predictable pipeline of major rail infrastructure projects. Allowing the UK supply chain to plan for the long term, reducing costs and building a skills base for the future.<br />In the medium term, the proposals put forward by HS2 Ltd would lead to huge regeneration opportunities here in Birmingham, in London and in due course in Manchester, Leeds and South Yorkshire.  For example, the major regeneration area of Eastside would find itself right at the heart of Britainâ&euro;&trade;s national transport infrastructure. But in the longer term, I firmly believe high speed rail would deliver a transformational change to the way Britain works and competes in the 21st century. As profound a change, perhaps, as the coming of the original railways delivered in the 19th century and the advent of motorways did in the 20th. It would slash journey times between major urban centres and international gateways.  It would free up capacity on the conventional mainline network to enable the continuing shift of freight from roads and onto rail, reducing carbon emissions and cutting congestion.<br />It would allow the economies of the Midlands and the North to benefit directly from the global magnetic effect of London, tackling the North-South divide in economic growth rates more effectively than half a century of regional policy has done as we expand labour markets and merge the travel to work areas of our major conurbations. West Midlands firms will be able more readily to access the markets and customers in London, while faster links from London to this region will make it more attractive to investors.The proposed Birmingham Interchange Station also would bring huge advantages in terms of connectivity to the wider West Midlands, with links to the motorway network, the airport, Birmingham International Station and the National Exhibition Centre where we meet today. And our commitment to extend the network beyond Birmingham has the potential to bring greater benefits still.  By connecting the West Midlands with Manchester, Sheffield and Leeds, as well as the East Midlands, high speed rail can merge them more and more into a single economic area, with the capability to compete not just with London, but with the other economic centres across Europe.<br />I submit that, reducing the journey time between two cities to 40 minutes represents not merely a quantitive reduction in travel time, but a qualitative change in the way they interact together.  High speed rail will merge our great population centres into a single economic hinterland.  In short it will provide us with a railway for the 21st century.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Recent route developments<br /> </strong>It was the transformational potential of high speed rail that captured the imagination of David Cameron back in 2008. And since we have been in Government, we have lost no time in pressing ahead with this exciting project. Weâ&euro;&trade;re continuing to develop and refine our proposals for the route from London to Birmingham, which will cut the journey time to just 49 minutes, even allowing for stops at Old Oak Common and Birmingham Interchange.  Possibly 40 minutes on a non-stop service. And weâ&euro;&trade;re working on plans to build a truly national high speed network as set out in the Coalition Agreement.<br />At the beginning of October, following work by HS2 Ltd, I announced that our preferred option for High Speed Rail north of Birmingham was for two separate corridors. One direct to Manchester, and then connecting onto the West Coast main line, and the other to Leeds via the East Midlands and South Yorkshire - with stations in both areas - before connecting onto the East Coast mainline south of York. This would reduce journey times to Manchester and Leeds to around 80 minutes - only slightly longer than many journeys across the capital. Meanwhile, the trip from Birmingham to Leeds would be almost halved - dropping from around 2 hours today to just an hour and 5 minutes. And weâ&euro;&trade;ve commissioned and received advice from HS2 Ltd on the options for the link to Heathrow, and for connecting to the wider European high speed network via the HS1 line.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Addressing the critics<br /> </strong>Now, I know that our plans for high speed rail are not universally popular. If I didn&#39;t know it before, I found out doing a series of meetings in the communities through which the proposed route will run between London and Birmingham. People are worried about the impact on the countryside. Some say the business case doesnâ&euro;&trade;t stack up and that the demand projections are fanciful. And some say that we wonâ&euro;&trade;t get this through Parliament in a million years. Let me take each of those challenges in turn.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Environment<br /> </strong>I fully understand that the national benefits of high speed rail have to be balanced against the impact on local environments. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why, in recent months, I have been visiting communities that will be affected by the proposed route. Listening to them. And why I, personally, have been over every mile of the route with HS2 engineers, looking at the stress points; challenging the alignment; exploring different approaches to mitigating the most intrusive local impacts. I am a great lover of our English countryside.  And I do not take the decisions on the HS2 lightly. We will do everything we practically can to mitigate the acoustic and visual impacts of the proposed line and deliver a solution that far exceeds the expectations of those who will be affected by it and who are understandably apprehensive of the impact of HS2. I will personally monitor the mitigation proposals - visual and acoustic - of every mile of this railway. And where we canâ&euro;&trade;t hide it, we will make every effort to make it an object of architectural beauty.  Just as Brunelâ&euro;&trade;s structures, once resisted as desecrating the countryside, are now accepted as enhancing it. We have launched an Exceptional Hardship scheme for homeowners who need to relocate urgently, and whose property values have been affected by the published route proposal. And weâ&euro;&trade;ve committed to consulting on a further scheme to help those whose property values are significantly eroded by the construction of a high speed line.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Business case<br /> </strong>Of course, it&#39;s not only the route and the environmental impact that have come under scrutiny. There are also many people who have questioned the business case for the project and, indeed, whether a line of this kind is needed at all. Our interurban railways undoubtedly face a major capacity challenge.<br />Rail journeys within the West Midlands have increased by almost 40 per cent over the last 5 years â&euro;&ldquo; with crippling capacity pressures forecast in the coming decades. So the real question is not whether demand will increase, but what are the options for dealing with it. Some people have argued that upgrading the existing West Coast Main Line is the best way to meet demand increases. But I am unconvinced that that is a credible option. First, because reliability would undoubtedly deteriorate through trying to squeeze ever more capacity out of existing, mixed-use, railway lines.  In contrast, a new, dedicated high speed passenger line could improve reliability by creating increasing segregation between different service types. And the released capacity created by HS2 would provide relief for the some of the worst pressures on the local and regional rail network in the West Midlands. More frequent and new services, improved timetabling, and greater resilience.  Attracting more travellers from the roads, relieving congestion and improving journey reliability.<br />Second, trying to deliver such a massive capacity upgrade on working lines would try the patience of the hardiest of rail passengers. Not to mention the occupiers of the thousands of homes that would need to be demolished. We all remember the last West Coast main line upgrade. [Lew Gradeâ&euro;&trade;s â&euro;&oelig;Raising the Titanicâ&euro;? quip]. And finally, because no upgrade of existing infrastructure can deliver the huge improvements in journey times, and step-change transformation of our economic geography, that a new high speed network would bring.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Political consensus<br /> </strong>And as for getting the Bill through Parliament â&euro;&ldquo; well, donâ&euro;&trade;t think I underestimate the scale of the challenge. Iâ&euro;&trade;ve heard enough war stories over the years from colleagues who have served on hybrid Bill committees to know just how challenging it is to get them onto the statute book. The key to the success of a project like this, one that will be delivered over many Parliaments, is cross-party consensus. Because this is not a plan for a Parliament. It is a plan for many generations and Parliaments to come. And we can only invest in it if we are clear that it will proceed over four or five Parliaments, whatever the political weather. So Iâ&euro;&trade;m grateful for the supportive position adopted so far by Opposition transport spokesmen â&euro;&ldquo; and of my predecessor. I will maintain an open and constructive dialogue with them as we move forward with this exciting project. On High Speed Rail, if on nothing else, I believe they will agree that â&euro;&oelig;we are all in this together.â&euro;?</p> <p> <br /> <strong>What happens next?<br /> </strong>Before I conclude, let me briefly set out what will happen next. We intend to announce the package for consultation, including a preferred route between London and the West Midlands, a corridor preference to Leeds and Manchester, and detailed plans for links to Heathrow and HS1 before Xmas. The consultation we will be launching in the New Year will be as comprehensive, inclusive and wide ranging as possibleâ&euro;¦â&euro;¦.an opportunity for everyone to make their views clear. It will cover both the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s overall high speed rail strategy and the route of the initial London-Birmingham phase of High Speed 2. We will analyse the no doubt numerous responses, and publish our response, setting out our proposed way forward, in December 2011, with the aim of getting the first hybrid Bill for the London-Birmingham route to Royal Assent by the end of this Parliament. But one thing is clear: the opponents of the High Speed Railway are organised, determined and well-financed.  They will make the case against the project â&euro;&ldquo; in spades. It is essential that those who see the power of High Speed Rail to deliver the economic change and those who benefit from the transformation it will bring to our economy, speak up and speak out â&euro;&ldquo; loudly and clearly â&euro;&ldquo; in favour of this project. If they do not, the argument could be lost by default.</p> <p> <br /> <strong>Conclusion<br /> </strong>So there is still much that needs to be done. And I do not for one minute underestimate the challenges involved in making high speed rail a reality.<br />I first looked at this project through the sceptical eyes of a Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury. And to those who ask how Britain can afford to invest in a project of this scale, I reply that we cannot afford not to invest in our future. And that if we are to prosper as a nation, every part of that nation has to prosper. It is a project that could transform the social and economic geography of Britain, and transform the role of cities like Birmingham.  By delivering greater mobility and connectivity; slashing journey times; and becoming the mode of choice for intercity travel. The potential to reduce our carbon footprint, shift demand from air to rail and to transform the way we use our existing railway. Above all, the potential to tackle the North-South gap in economic growth rates, a prize that has eluded all modern governments, boosting economic growth across the whole UK, supporting a re-balancing our economy and helping to secure our competitiveness. In short, a vital part of our plan to secure Britainâ&euro;&trade;s place in the 21st century global economy.<br />Thank you.<br /> </p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:17.662698 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20101130 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP High Speed Rail Business Debate Department for Transport 29 November 2010 2010-11-29T00:00:00 High Speed Rail Business Debate, NEC Birmingham
<p>Thank you Colin, for that introduction.</p> <p>My Ministerial colleague Theresa Villiers was very sorry that she could not be here today to talk about our transport plans for the Olympics.</p> <p>But it is a pleasure for me to be able to take her place.</p> <p>And wonderful to see so many of you here.</p> <p>Ladies and gentlemen, the 2012 Olympic Games are just 20 months away.</p> <p>The excitement is already building.</p> <p>And with good reason.</p> <p>The last time London hosted the Olympics was just after the Second World War in 1948. Unsurprisingly, they were relatively low-key.</p> <p>But the 2012 Games will be the largest international event of any kind ever held in this countryâ&euro;¦</p> <p>Providing London with an unprecedented opportunity to showcase itself to the worldâ&euro;¦.</p> <p>Giving sport in this country a massive boostâ&euro;¦.</p> <p>And â&euro;&ldquo; as Paul has just outlined â&euro;&ldquo; delivering an economic legacy for London and the UK that will be felt for decades to come.</p> <p>But, as crucial as it is, delivering a successful Games isnâ&euro;&trade;t just about maximising economic opportunitiesâ&euro;¦.</p> <p>And itâ&euro;&trade;s not just about building a wonderful new Olympic Stadium, and state of the art venues around the countryâ&euro;¦.</p> <p>It is also about planning ahead so we are well prepared for the broader impact that the Games will have on Londonâ&euro;¦..</p> <p>And in particular, ensuring that people are able to travel to and from venues, and around London, as freely and comfortably as possible.</p> <p>So we are absolutely clear that a safe, reliable, accessible transport system is of pivotal importance to a successful Olympic Games.</p> <p>We will need to accommodate up to 800,000 spectators each day, and 55,000 athletes, officials, and members of accredited media â&euro;&ldquo; as well as thousands of other people involved in staging the Games.</p> <p>To get some idea of total demand, there will be around 8.8 million tickets available for 16 days of Olympic events, and another 2 million tickets for 11 days of Paralympic events.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why thereâ&euro;&trade;s been an ambitious programme to extend and modernise our transport infrastructure in time for 2012, which David Higgins is going to talk about in a moment.</p> <p>But even with these improvements, the demands placed on our transport system during the Olympics will be huge.</p> <p>We need to be well prepared to ensure that the Tube, rail, and road network can support non-Olympics demand â&euro;&ldquo; so the rest of London continues functioning as smoothly as possible.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why Travel Advice for Business is so important.</p> <p>You have told us you wanted as much time as possible to prepare.</p> <p>By engaging and working with you now, we can minimise the impact on your businesses, and reduce overall â&euro;&tilde;backgroundâ&euro;&trade; demand for transport during the Games.</p> <p>But let me be clearâ&euro;¦.this is not about stopping you working.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s about helping employers organise well in advance to avoid disruption, for what is a relatively short period of time.</p> <p>Today you will be hearing about TAB in more detail, the tools available to you, and other ways we can help you and your businesses plan aheadâ&euro;¦.</p> <p>For example, by using online information available at london2012.com to see where and when your business will be affectedâ&euro;¦â&euro;¦and to find advice on how you can ensure that your business runs smoothly during the Games.</p> <p>Reducing general travel demand will be essential to help deal with the extra pressure on roads and transport networks.</p> <p>We hope you can help us here by stopping non-essential travel, and getting people to re-time, re-route, or revise their travel plans.</p> <p>So it is vital that we communicate with companies and employers right across London â&euro;&ldquo; so the advice can be passed on to the widest possible audience.</p> <p>In conclusion, ladies and gentlemen.</p> <p>I believe the 2012 Olympic Games belong to all of us. The whole of the UK.</p> <p>They are our Games. And just as we will all benefit from hosting this global celebration, so we should all contribute to making it a success.</p> <p>In particular, I think the business community has embraced the opportunities provided by the Games in spectacular fashion.</p> <p>And I know you will play your part in helping us reduce demand for travel and transport over a few short weeks in the summer of 2012.</p> <p>Make no mistake. The transport challenges we face will be real and significant.</p> <p>Our planning needs to be spot on. And our communication needs to be spot on.</p> <p>But by working together now, we can go a long way to avoiding disruption and overcrowding on our transport networkâ&euro;¦..</p> <p>So come July 2012, we are ready to host the greatest Olympic Games ever.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:23.414649 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20101124 Norman Baker MP London 2012 Travel Advice to Business Launch Department for Transport 24 November 2010 2010-11-24T00:00:00 London Organising Committee 2012 Olympics, London Business Board
<p>Thank you, Brian, for that introduction. Itâ&euro;&trade;s a pleasure to be with you all in North Tyneside this afternoon.</p> <p>If I may, I would like to address you at two levels today.</p> <p>Of course you care about the North East and its transport, but you are also business people with an interest in the reputation and performance of UK Plc.</p> <p>I want to explain to you why I think the North East has a key part to play in the economic recovery, and what I am doing to contribute to it.</p> <p>Why I think the North East should be talking itself up â&euro;&ldquo; not doing itself down.</p> <p>What we as a Government will be doing to build the balanced and low-carbon economy thatâ&euro;&trade;s essential for our future prosperity, and what I as Transport Secretary am doing to ensure that Transport contributes to that agenda.</p> <p>The long and proud industrial heritage of this region is well known.</p> <p>During the 18th and 19th centuries the North East was the cradle of the industrial revolution.</p> <p>And in transport heritage, it bows to no one as the home of the first public steam railway in the world, between Darlington and Stockton-on-Tees.</p> <p>Then in the first half of the last century, this region went on to establish a world class reputation in everything from building ships, to mining coal, to brewing beer.</p> <p>Of course, the last quarter of the 20th century presented major challenges to the heavy industrial base as the world economy began to globalise. And I am extremely conscious that the trauma of that change is still felt today.</p> <p>But if we fast forward to the 21st century, and science and research, information technology, knowledge-based companies and high-tech manufacturers have become the hallmarks of the new North East economy.</p> <p>We see that today, the region is one of the UKâ&euro;&trade;s top performers in attracting foreign direct investment, with an automotive sector worth close to £1 billion in local Gross Value Added, a third of this countryâ&euro;&trade;s total pharmaceutical production and nearly two thirds of the UKâ&euro;&trade;s petrochemical industry.</p> <p>And, again as Martin highlighted, from wind and solar power generation, to biotechnology and carbon capture, the North East is fast emerging as a national centre and a global leader in the key areas of green growth.<br />These are all achievements of which you can rightly be proud and on which you can build for the future.</p> <p>Of course, I recognise that getting our economy back on a sustainable track is going to involve some very hard slog â&euro;&ldquo; here in the North East, and across the UK as a whole.</p> <p>But at least we are now talking about getting back on course; a year or two ago, we were talking about how close we were to the abyss.</p> <p>And now that our economy is on the road to recovery, Britain must face up to an unprecedented fiscal crisis.</p> <p>We inherited the biggest budget deficit in the G20 and had just limped out of the longest and deepest recession in our peacetime history.</p> <p>Every single day we were adding £400 million to our national debt.</p> <p>Had we kept to the spending plans we inherited, we would be paying out nearly £70 billion a year in debt interest alone by the end of the Parliament.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s more than we spend on schooling our children and defending our country put together.</p> <p>Letting those debts carry on rising would have led to higher interest rates, undermined confidence in Britain and put the recovery at risk.</p> <p>If we were now where Ireland is, paying interest rates of about 6% for UK gilts, we would be looking not at £70 billion a year of debt interest, but more like £180 billion â&euro;&ldquo; or 12% of our GDP.</p> <p>So we had to take tough decisions to get the deficit under control and keep interest rates low.</p> <p>By cancelling £6 billion worth of planned public spending this year.</p> <p>By setting out, in our Emergency Budget in June, an ambitious four year plan to eliminate entirely our structural deficit and get debt falling as a percentage of GDP.</p> <p>And a month ago, we delivered the conclusions of the Spending Review, with firm and fixed spending totals for each government department for the rest of this Parliament, and far-reaching reforms to welfare and our public services.</p> <p>Already weâ&euro;&trade;re seeing the rewards.</p> <p>AAA credit status confirmed, Britain almost a poster-child of the bond markets and accolades from economic forecasters and business organisations alike.</p> <p>The independent Office for Budget Responsibility projects falling unemployment and positive economic growth in each of the next four years.</p> <p>And more good news yesterday with national employment up nearly 170,000 net over the last quarter, despite public sector cuts.</p> <p>In the North East, an additional 47,000 people are in work compared to a year ago.</p> <p>Fiscal consolidation and the confidence that discipline in the public finances brings has been a necessary condition for Britainâ&euro;&trade;s recovery. But it is only part of the story.</p> <p>Our really big challenge is to build on the foundations that sound public finances provide to secure the growth, the jobs, and the private sector investment that will drive our prosperity in the years ahead.</p> <p>Building a strong, competitive economy for the longer term, while delivering on our climate change targets.</p> <p>The Chancellor made clear in his Budget speech that infrastructure investment will be a vital part of our approach.</p> <p>We are determined to avoid, at all costs, repeating the mistake of the recent past of spending too much but investing too little.</p> <p>And we will not repeat the mistakes of successive British Governments by trying to fix the public finances by slashing capital spend. We have made the tough choice to tackle waste, inefficiency and to tackle head on welfare to protect infrastructure investment.</p> <p>In science and technology; in power generation; in skills â&euro;&ldquo; but above all, in transport.</p> <p>Demonstrating the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s commitment to prioritising the projects that will put Britain â&euro;&ldquo; and this region - back in the game.</p> <p>Over the next four years, we will invest over £30 billion in road, rail and local transport projects right across Britain â&euro;&ldquo; more than was invested in the last four years.</p> <p>Our plans for a high speed rail network lie at the heart of the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s transport policy and our strategy to rebalance and rebuild Britainâ&euro;&trade;s economy.</p> <p>This ambitious and exciting project would allow the economies of the Midlands and the North to benefit directly from the global pull of London and the south east, tackling the North-South divide in economic growth rates more effectively than half a century of regional policy has done, as we expand labour markets and merge the travel to work areas of our major conurbations. </p> <p>Providing better connections not just to London, but between the Midlands and the North as well.</p> <p>The journey time between Newcastle and Birmingham will be cut from 3 hours to around 2 hours 20 minutes.</p> <p>From London to Leeds, reduced to 80 minutes.</p> <p>In short, high speed rail would deliver transformational change to the way Britain works and competes in the 21st century. In many respects as profound a change as the coming of the original railways delivered in the 19th century and the advent of motorways did in the 20th.</p> <p>So since we came to office in May, we have pressed ahead with our plans.</p> <p>At the beginning of October, I announced that our preferred option for High Speed Rail north of Birmingham was for two separate corridors â&euro;&ldquo; the â&euro;&tilde;Yâ&euro;&trade; option.</p> <p>One direct to Manchester, and then connecting onto the West Coast main line, and the other to Leeds via the East Midlands and South Yorkshireâ&euro;&ldquo; with stations in both areas â&euro;&ldquo; before connecting onto the East Coast mainline north of Leeds to deliver improved journey times to the North East and Edinburgh.</p> <p>And in the next few weeks I will launch the detailed proposals that we will consult on in the New Year - which will include a preferred route between London and the West Midlands, and a corridor preference to Leeds and Manchester.</p> <p>The new capacity high speed rail delivers will be vital in addressing the rail capacity challenges that are facing our most congested inter-urban routes.</p> <p>Freeing up capacity to enable the continuing shift of freight from roads and onto rail, reducing carbon emissions and cutting congestion</p> <p>But thereâ&euro;&trade;s a problem. In Britain, we have one of the most expensive railways in Europe. More expensive to build, less efficient to maintain, and more expensive to ride on compared with other European systems.</p> <p>That is not acceptable.<br />So we will review and reform the way the rail industry functions. The way Network Rail operates. And the way franchises are let and run.<br />Building on the work of Sir Roy McNultyâ&euro;&trade;s value-for-money study, to drive efficiency in rail investment and operations, so that the railway can play its crucial part in delivering sustainable transport for the future and offer a fair deal to passengers and taxpayers alike.<br />I want to say something about the Intercity Express Programme, which would provide new high-speed trains for the East Coast and Great Western Main Lines.<br />I recognise how important this project is to this region and, as you know, we have been carrying out further value for money analysis of the programme following the review published by Sir Andrew Foster in the summer.</p> <p>We are now considering a revised proposition from Agility Trains, as well as the alternatives to the IEP identified by Sir Andrew Foster.</p> <p>We will take into account the huge benefits Hitachiâ&euro;&trade;s proposed factory in Newton Aycliffe would bring to this area, placing Britain at the heart of the European rail industry.</p> <p>But, in the wake of Sir Andrewâ&euro;&trade;s findings, we must also be mindful of the importance of ensuring whatever decision we make delivers the best possible value for taxpayersâ&euro;&trade; money â&euro;&ldquo; and that the commercial, legal and technical case for the decision we take at the end of the process is a robust one.</p> <p>I know you are eager for a decision, and I can assure you that I will make an announcement on the future of the programme to the House of Commons at the earliest possible opportunity.</p> <p>But, exciting as all the new rail investment is, a balanced and sustainable transport strategy cannot just be about rail.</p> <p>We should also remember that over 80% of journeys are made by car, with our roads representing our greatest investment in national transport infrastructure.</p> <p>Roads and cars have had a bit of a bad press since the focus has been on climate change, but they remain the only practicable mode of transport in many areas.</p> <p>So this Government is committed to decarbonising motoring so that, while we work to meet our climate change obligations, we can ensure the car remains an integral part of Britainâ&euro;&trade;s future transport plans</p> <p>That is why we are supporting the ultra-low emissions technologies that will see the carbon output of cars plummet over the next two decades</p> <p>Our Plug-In Car Grant will give a generous consumer incentive of up to £5,000 towards the purchase of a next-generation ultra low emission car.</p> <p>Our commitment to this generous subsidy, even in the face of severe public spending restraint, to kick-start the market for low-carbon vehicles has ensured that Britain will be a principle launch market for global manufacturers. Bolstering our status as a leading player in green vehicle technology.</p> <p>Order books for the first new generation, all-electric vehicle â&euro;&ldquo; the Nissan Leaf- opened in Britain in the summer and the first vehicles will be delivered early next year.</p> <p>Imported from Japan in the first instance, yes.</p> <p>But with Government support, by 2013 they will be rolling off the production lines in Nissanâ&euro;&trade;s plant in Sunderland.</p> <p>Building on the pioneering work already being done in the North East on electric vehicle development â&euro;&ldquo; such as by the likes of Smith Electric Vehicles in Washington.</p> <p>Meanwhile, our Plugged-in Places programme â&euro;&ldquo; rolling out public charging infrastructure for these next-generation cars - will allow us to gather important information about the way people use electric cars.</p> <p>As one of three pilot areas, the North East is playing a key role in this exciting project.</p> <p>The pilot will mean that 1,300 charging points â&euro;&ldquo; located on streets and in car parks, and near retail and leisure facilities - will be rolled out across the region. I saw one of them in action in Newcastle City Centre this morning.</p> <p>Cementing the North Eastâ&euro;&trade;s position in the vanguard of the green motoring revolution.</p> <h2>Investments in NE region</h2> <p>But besides those major national infrastructure investments, weâ&euro;&trade;re also giving the green light to a number of key local and regional transport schemes that will directly benefit local commuters and businesses.</p> <p>The improvements to the East Coast Main Line that will result in faster and more reliable rail services. </p> <p>The £350 million upgrade of the Tyne and Wear Metro.</p> <p>The £37.5 million weâ&euro;&trade;re investing in accelerating delivery of the Tees Valley Bus Network.</p> <p>A £2.25 million grant from our Green Bus Fund to Stagecoach North East for 26 diesel-electric hybrid buses to run on routes in Newcastle.</p> <p>Over £2 million in grant funding to help establish a public transport smartcard.  </p> <p>And today, I can announce a £2.8 million investment to increase the traffic capacity of the A19 Silverlink interchange in the short term.</p> <p>This will be completed next summer, ready for the opening of the second Tyne Tunnel and work will continue in parallel on the £108 million of A19 upgrades.</p> <h2>Localism / funding devolution</h2> <p>All these projects will give the local economy, and the local community, a vital shot in the arm. But if we are truly to unleash the growth potential of our regions, the way we deliver investment funding also needs reform.</p> <p>And for this Coalition Government, the preferred reform is localism.</p> <p>We want to devolve as much responsibility and funding as possible to local level â&euro;&ldquo; with far fewer civil servants sitting in Whitehall monitoring progress and setting targets.</p> <p>In transport, that means scrapping the multiple streams of transport resource funding for local government and replacing them with just two â&euro;&ldquo; a formula grant which will go to all authorities to allow them to set their own prioritiesâ&euro;¦..</p> <p>â&euro;¦â&euro;¦ and a Local Sustainable Transport Fund, worth some £560 million of capital and resource, which will consolidate the remaining money in a single pot for which local authorities can bid to support their plans for their areas.</p> <p>More widely, our Local Growth White Paper, published three weeks ago, takes forward proposals for our £1.5 billion Regional Growth Fund, which will be used to support projects which have significant growth potential and create sustainable private sector employment. In areas which are heavily dependent on the public sector â&euro;&ldquo; including transport projects.</p> <p>And, we have approved the formation of 24 Local Enterprise Partnerships across the United Kingdom; bottom-up partnerships between local authorities and businesses that will give local areas the opportunity to be the masters of their own economic destiny.</p> <p>I am delighted that the Tees Valley Partnership has been given the green light in the first wave of Local Enterprise Partnerships to be announced and I hope that further partnerships in the region can be taken forward in the coming months.</p> <p>From a transport perspective, I want to see how local enterprise partnerships can play a role in my Departmentâ&euro;&trade;s local capital funding allocation.</p> <p>I will seek to work with them and local authorities to establish a way of delegating decision-making to them to allow them to develop truly innovative transport solutions. </p> <p>Helping to deliver the growth and the jobs that will get this area open for business again. </p> <h3>The prize â&euro;&ldquo; business investment and entrepreneurship</h3> <p>The North East should view these challenges with confidence. It has all the right ingredients for a strong and prosperous future:</p> <p>Its geography, with seaports perfectly positioned to exploit Britainâ&euro;&trade;s prevailing trade patterns with continental Europe</p> <p>A transport infrastructure that we will continue to develop and improve, reducing journey times and cutting congestion.</p> <p>And most of all, its people: a skilled and educated workforce and extensive collaboration networks where cutting edge research institutions and internationally respected universities work hand in glove with industry.</p> <p>Of course, attracting the big iconic inward investors â&euro;&ldquo; the Nissans of this world â&euro;&ldquo; is crucially important.</p> <p>But much of the growth, the organic growth, will come from the North Eastâ&euro;&trade;s own entrepreneurs; from the sole traders, from home grown small and medium sized businesses.</p> <p>Less glamorous, perhaps, than those major overseas investments, but just as crucial to the future of UK Plc.</p> <p>And this growth is real. Itâ&euro;&trade;s happening already.</p> <p>Which city has the fastest growing rate of increase of new business start ups in the UK, according to a recent Royal Mail study?</p> <p>Not London. Not Birmingham. Not Manchester. But Sunderland.</p> <h3>Concluding remarks</h3> <p>So the North East is a region with a great story to tell â&euro;&ldquo; one of entrepreneurship, resilience, and dynamism.</p> <p>Of course, there are tough times ahead, for all of us, as we seek to readjust to this new economic reality.</p> <p>But this is an area thatâ&euro;&trade;s already demonstrated â&euro;&ldquo; in spades â&euro;&ldquo; that it can reinvent itself, in the face of adversity, to respond to change.</p> <p>Continual re-invention as the world changes around us is likely to be a key hallmark of success in the global economy of the future.</p> <p>And I have no doubt that the North East can, and will, rise to that challenge in the years ahead and play its part in returning Britain to the path of sustainable economic growth and lasting prosperity.<br /> </p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:29.160228 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond201011018 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP Transport Futures Seminar Department for Transport 18 November 2010 2010-11-18T00:00:00 North East Economic Forum
<h2>Introduction</h2> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s a pleasure to be here today, and I would like to thank David Begg and his team for giving me the opportunity this morning to tell you about the progress to date on HS2 and our commitment, at a political level, to taking the agenda forward.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;d also like to thank you for your patience, given that it is now this afternoon.</p> <p>One thing Iâ&euro;&trade;ve learnt about the transport portfolio in six months is that itâ&euro;&trade;s never predictable!</p> <p>Youâ&euro;&trade;ve already heard from Sir Brian Briscoe this morning on the work HS2 are doing to make high speed rail a reality.</p> <p>I donâ&euro;&trade;t think thereâ&euro;&trade;s much I can add to the excellent overview heâ&euro;&trade;s given you on how he and his team are going to progress this project in the coming months.</p> <p>So what I want to talk to you about today is the bigger picture for high speed rail. And the political dimension to the project.</p> <p>The role it plays in the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s transport strategy.</p> <p>The huge benefits I believe it can bring to our country.</p> <p>How it fits in our wider agenda for rebalancing and rebuilding Britainâ&euro;&trade;s economy.</p> <p>And why - even in these difficult economic times - we are committed to pursuing such a huge investment.</p> <h2>Economic Context</h2> <p>Let me set the scene by putting our decisions in context:</p> <p>You donâ&euro;&trade;t need me to tell you that we faced an unprecedented fiscal crisis when we came to office.</p> <p>We were saddled with the biggest budget deficit in the G20 and had just limped out of the longest and deepest recession in our peacetime history.</p> <p>Every single day we were adding £400 million to our national debt.</p> <p>Had we kept to the spending plans we inherited, we would be paying out nearly £70 billion a year in interest alone by the end of the Parliament - more than we spend on schooling our children and defending our country combined.</p> <p>If weâ&euro;&trade;d let those debts go on rising, it would have led to higher interest rates, undermined confidence in Britain and put the recovery at risk.</p> <p>So we have had to take tough decisions to get the deficit under control.</p> <p>By cancelling £6 billion worth of planned public spending this year.</p> <p>By setting out, in our Emergency Budget in June, an ambitious four year plan to eliminate entirely our structural deficit and get debt falling as a percentage of GDP.</p> <p>And two weeks ago, by delivering the conclusions of the Spending Review, with firm and fixed spending totals for each government department for the rest of this Parliament, and far-reaching reforms to welfare and our public services.</p> <p>And itâ&euro;&trade;s working already.</p> <p>Our early action to balance Britainâ&euro;&trade;s books is already paying dividends.</p> <p>Our AAA credit rating has been reconfirmed and we now have a clean bill of health from the IMF - who described our budget as â&euro;&tilde;essentialâ&euro;&trade; to securing the conditions for sustainable economic growth.</p> <p>But that vital fiscal readjustment is only part of the story.</p> <p>A necessary, but not sufficient, condition for Britainâ&euro;&trade;s recovery.</p> <h2>Growth and importance of infrastructure investment</h2> <p>The challenge is to secure the growth, the jobs, the investment that will drive our prosperity in the future.</p> <p>So now the hard work really begins, as we seek to lay the foundations for building a strong, competitive economy for the longer term, while delivering on our climate change targets.</p> <p>And the Chancellor made clear in his Budget speech that infrastructure investment will be a key part of our approach.</p> <p>We will not repeat past mistakes where governments spent too much and invested too little.</p> <p>Or of indiscriminately cutting infrastructure investment - previously seen as the easy option behind which countless governments, of all persuasions, have sheltered from taking the tough decisions on current spending, and on welfare in particular.</p> <p>Our recently published National Infrastructure Plan â&euro;&ldquo; the first ever published by a UK Government - underlines our commitment to investment in infrastructure as a platform for growth.</p> <p>And transport infrastructure in particular.</p> <p>The settlement Transport received in the Spending Review - £18 billion of rail investments; £4 billion in Highways Agency investment, and £6 billion on local transport investments - overall an 11% reduction in capital spending against a Government-wide 50% benchmark - the plans our predecessors put in place in their last budget - demonstrates the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s commitment to prioritising the projects that will support economic growth and job creation.</p> <p>That settlement also included over £750 million to fund the development of our plans for a national high speed rail network over the Spending Review period, with the bulk of capital expenditure occurring after 2015 - when, on our plans, the public finances will be back in balance.</p> <p>So today I want to explain why I believe high speed rail can make a critical contribution to our economic future, as well as our climate change agenda. And talk through the processes and the politics that lie ahead.</p> <h2>The Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s transport strategy</h2> <p>When I took over this brief, the challenge was clear: with limited resources, support economic growth and rebalancing, and support greenhouse gas reduction.</p> <p>The need for a cross-modal approach was obvious.</p> <p>For instance, our decision to reject new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted because of local environmental impacts and CO2 concerns, coupled with the need to ensure that the scarce capacity at our international airports is available for the medium- and long-haul routes that are vital to our economic success, inevitably points to modal shift.</p> <p>The success of high speed rail across Europe has shown how effectively such links can cater for journeys that had previously been dominated by aviation.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why our commitment to a high speed rail network has been a key factor in taking the difficult decisions we have taken on additional capacity at London&#39;s airports.</p> <p>And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why we have said from the outset that a meaningful High Speed Rail network must include a link to our principal gateway airport.</p> <p>But high speed rail isnâ&euro;&trade;t just about modal shift. Itâ&euro;&trade;s also about addressing the rail capacity challenges that are facing our most congested inter-urban routes.</p> <p>Reducing crowding, improving reliability, speeding up journeys, and catering for the increased demand that comes from continued economic growth.</p> <p>And, of course, it is not only inter-city journeys that would benefit from a new high speed line. As long distance point to point services transfer to the new line, valuable capacity is released to meet the growing demand for longer-distance commuter travel and for services to intermediate towns.</p> <p>High speed rail will be an unbeatable option for inter-urban travel. With none of the hassle of short-haul flying. Even I could not contemplate driving from London to Birmingham in 49 minutes. It took me that long to Park Royal last time I did it.</p> <h2>The role of high-speed rail in delivering the Government&#39;s growth strategy</h2> <p>But high speed rail isnâ&euro;&trade;t just a central plank of our transport strategy. It is also key to our wider plans for securing sustainable economic growth.</p> <p>In the short-term it has the potential to create thousands of jobs planning, constructing and operating the proposed line.</p> <p>New high speed rail lines, on which construction would begin as Crossrail is completed, would also form part of a predictable pipeline of major rail infrastructure projects.</p> <p>Allowing the UK supply chain to plan for the long term, reducing costs and building a skills base for the future.</p> <p>In the medium term, the proposals put forward by HS2 Ltd would lead to the regeneration of significant brownfield sites in West London and Birmingham. </p> <p>Further regeneration opportunities in Manchester, Leeds, the East Midlands and South Yorkshire will open up.</p> <p>But in the longer term, I firmly believe high speed rail would deliver a transformational change to the way Britain works and competes in the 21st century. Just as profound a change as the coming of the original railways delivered in the 19th century and the advent of motorways did in the 20th.</p> <p>It would slash journey times between major urban centres and international gateways.  </p> <p>It would free up capacity to enable the continuing shift of freight from roads and onto rail, reducing carbon emissions and cutting congestion.</p> <p>It would allow the economies of the Midlands and the North to benefit directly from the economic engine of London and the south east, tackling the North-South divide more effectively than half a century of regional policy has done as we expand labour markets and merge the travel to work areas of our major conurbations. </p> <p>Providing a railway for the 21st century.</p> <h2>Recent route developments</h2> <p>It was the transformational potential of high speed rail that captured the imagination of David Cameron back in 2008.</p> <p>And since we have been in Government, we&#39;ve lost no time in developing our plans for a truly national network.</p> <p>At the beginning of October, following work by HS2 Ltd, I announced that our preferred option for High Speed Rail north of Birmingham was for two separate corridors.</p> <p>One direct to Manchester, and then connecting onto the West Coast main line, and the other to Leeds via the East Midlands and South Yorkshire - with stations in both areas - before connecting onto the East Coast mainline south of York.</p> <p>As Brian has already said, this would reduce journey times to Manchester and Leeds to around 80 minutes - only slightly longer than many journeys across the capital.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the trip from Birmingham to Leeds would be almost halved - dropping from around 2 hours today to just an hour and 5 minutes.</p> <p>And by shifting long-distance services onto the new line, we would free up valuable capacity for commuter, regional and freight services on the West Coast Main Line, the East Coast Main Line and the Midland Main Line.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Iâ&euro;&trade;ve commissioned and received advice from HS2 Ltd on the options for the link to Heathrow, and for connecting to the wider European high speed network via the HS1 line.</p> <h2>Addressing the critics</h2> <p>Now, I know that our plans for high speed rail are not universally popular.</p> <p>If I didn&#39;t know it before, I found out doing a series of meetings in the communities through which the proposed route will run.</p> <p>People claim itâ&euro;&trade;ll damage the environment.</p> <p>That the business case doesnâ&euro;&trade;t stack up.</p> <p>And that weâ&euro;&trade;ll never get this through Parliament in a million years.</p> <p>Well, I am happy to take each of those challenges head-on.</p> <h2>Environment</h2> <p>Of course, I am not blind to the environmental impacts of HS2.</p> <p>And I understand that the national benefits of high speed rail have to be balanced against the impact on local environments.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why, in recent months, I have been visiting communities that will be affected by the proposed route. Listening to them.</p> <p>And why I, personally, have been over every mile of the route with HS2 engineers, looking at the stress points; challenging the alignment; exploring different approaches to mitigating the most intrusive local impacts.</p> <p>I love our countryside - its beauty and its tranquillity.</p> <p>And I am determined that we will do everything we practically can to mitigate the noise and visual impacts of the proposed line and deliver a solution that far exceeds the expectations of those who would be outside the statutory blight arrangements but who are understandably apprehensive of the impact of HS2.</p> <p>I intend to personally monitor the mitigation proposals - visual and acoustic - of every mile of this railway.</p> <p>We have launched an Exceptional Hardship scheme for homeowners who need to relocate urgently, and whose property values have been affected by the published route proposal.</p> <p>And weâ&euro;&trade;ve committed to consulting on a further scheme to help those whose property values are significantly eroded by a high speed line.</p> <h2>Business case</h2> <p>Of course, it&#39;s not only the route and the environmental impact that has come under scrutiny.</p> <p>There are also many people who have questioned the business case for the project and, indeed, whether a line of this kind is needed at all.</p> <p>Paul Plummer from Network Rail has already spoken about the capacity challenge that our inter-urban railways face.</p> <p>But it seems clear to me that the question is not whether demand will increase, but what are the options for dealing with it.</p> <p>Some people have argued that upgrading the existing West Coast Main Line is the best way to meet demand increases.</p> <p>But I am unconvinced that that is a credible option.</p> <p>First, because reliability would undoubtedly deteriorate through trying to squeeze ever more capacity out of existing, mixed-use, railway lines. </p> <p>In contrast, a new high speed line could improve reliability by creating increasing segregation between different service types.</p> <p>Second, trying to deliver such a massive capacity upgrade on working lines â&euro;&ldquo; particularly the main commuter routes into London from the north â&euro;&ldquo; would try the patience of the hardiest of rail passengers. Not to mention the occupiers of the very large number of houses that would need to be demolished.</p> <p>We all remember the last West Coast main line upgrade.</p> <p>And finally, because no upgrade of existing infrastructure can deliver the huge improvements in journey times, and step-change transformation of our economic geography, that a new high speed network would bring.</p> <h2>Political consensus</h2> <p>And as for getting the Bill through Parliament â&euro;&ldquo; well, donâ&euro;&trade;t think I underestimate the scale of the challenge.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve heard enough war stories over the years from colleagues who have served on hybrid Bill committees to know just how challenging it is to get them onto the statute book.</p> <p>The key to the success of a project like this is cross-party consensus.</p> <p>This is not a plan for a Parliament. It is a plan for a generation. And we can only invest in it if we are clear that it will proceed over four or five Parliaments, whatever the political weather.</p> <p>So Iâ&euro;&trade;m grateful for the supportive position adopted by Opposition transport spokesmen â&euro;&ldquo; and of my predecessor.</p> <p>I will maintain an open and constructive dialogue with them as we move forward with this exciting project.</p> <p>On High Speed Rail, if on nothing else, I believe they will agree that â&euro;&oelig;we are all in this together.â&euro;?</p> <h2>What happens next?</h2> <p>Brian in his presentation to you this morning, gave you an outline of whatâ&euro;&trade;s going to happen next.</p> <p>We intend to announce the package for consultation, including a preferred route between London and the West Midlands, a corridor preference to Leeds and Manchester, and detailed plans for links to Heathrow and HS1, later this year.</p> <p>The consultation we will be launching in the New Year will be as comprehensive, inclusive and wide ranging as possibleâ&euro;¦â&euro;¦.an opportunity for everyone to make their views clear.</p> <p>It will cover both the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s overall high speed rail strategy and the route of the initial London-Birmingham phase of High Speed 2.</p> <p>We will analyse the no doubt numerous responses, and publish our response, setting out our proposed way forward, in December 2011, with the aim of getting the first hybrid Bill for the London-Birmingham route to Royal Assent by the end of this Parliament.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>There is still much that needs to be done. And I do not for one minute underestimate the challenges involved in making high speed rail a reality.</p> <p>I first looked at this project through the sceptical eyes of a Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury.</p> <p>And to those who ask how Britain can afford to invest in a project of this scale, I reply that we cannot afford not to invest in our future.<br /> <br />And that if we are to prosper as a nation, every part of that nation has to prosper, has to contribute.</p> <p>And strategic transport projects like HS2 have a vital role in making that happen.</p> <p>Even while I still held that Shadow Treasury post, I convinced myself of the strategic potential of this project.</p> <p>The potential to transform the social and economic geography of Britain.</p> <p>By delivering greater mobility and connectivity; slashing journey times; and becoming the mode of choice for intercity travel.</p> <p>The potential to reduce our carbon footprint, shift demand from air to rail and to transform the way we use our existing railway.</p> <p>Above all, the potential to tackle the North-South gap in economic growth rates, a prize that has eluded all modern governments, boosting economic growth across the whole UK and helping to secure our competitiveness in the global economy.<br /> <br />In short, a vital part of our plan to build a better Britain.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:35.479002 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20101104 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP High Speed Rail Conference Department for Transport 04 November 2010 2010-11-04T00:00:00 Transport Times - High Speed Rail Conference
<p>Thank you for that introduction, Sir Paul. </p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;d also like to thank Andrea for organising this event and Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to thank all of you here who have taken the trouble to come along to Parliament today to take part.</p> <p>I am certain that this meeting will provide a valuable opportunity for those affected by a potential new high speed rail line to express their views and make their voice heard. </p> <p>Unfortunately I canâ&euro;&trade;t stay for the whole debate, but the Secretary of State will join you later in the session to take part in the Question and Answer panel. </p> <p>The Government is fully aware of the fears you have about the impact high speed rail could have on your homes and your communities.</p> <p>Let me assure you that your local MPs are providing a strong voice for you in holding the Government to account on this.</p> <p>Let me also assure you that we are listening both to your MPs and to you â&euro;¦ the communities affected by HS2 proposals.</p> <p>As many of you will be aware, a few weeks ago, the Secretary of State visited the line of route recommended by HS2 Ltd. </p> <p>In the series of meetings he held, he heard your views clearly and passionately expressed.</p> <p>The Government fully acknowledges the importance of balancing the wider benefits of high speed rail with the local impacts on landscapes and communities. </p> <p>We fully appreciate that we need to listen to the views of the communities who could be affected and we know it is essential that we address and reduce the local impact of high speed rail where possible.  </p> <p>We believe that careful mitigation measures can address the most intrusive local impacts to deliver an overall solution which is balanced and fair.</p> <p>We have been working hard since the election to get the right solution on high speed rail. </p> <p>In the Summer, the Secretary of State asked HS2 Ltd to carry out further work on links to Heathrow and to HS1 for a connection to the Channel Tunnel and Europe. </p> <p>This would increase international connectivity and strengthen the potential for a switch from air to rail.</p> <p>In October he announced the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s preferred option for lines to Manchester and Leeds dividing in the West Midlands - significantly increasing the economic benefits of high speed rail.</p> <p>In the meantime â&euro;¦ HS2 Ltd has been working on further ways to improve the line of route to reduce the social and environmental impact on local people. </p> <p>They have been running a series of technical seminars to help local action groups understand the detailed work being undertaken on the business case, technical specifications and noise issues.</p> <p>An initial report has been published which identifies a number of ways to reduce the negative consequences for communities on the northern part of HS2â&euro;&trade;s preferred route. </p> <p>This work is continuing and it is being informed by the points made to the Secretary of State during his visits to that route last month. So input from local communities is already having a real impact on HS2â&euro;&trade;s work.</p> <p>During the Summer, Philip launched an Exceptional Hardship Scheme to assist those with the most urgent need to sell their properties. </p> <p>But he has also made it very clear that if a decision is taken to go ahead and a final route is confirmed, we will put measures in place to manage blight which go well beyond the current statutory requirements.</p> <p>We believe that is essential if we are to achieve a successful and fair outcome in relation to high speed rail.</p> <p>I would now like to set out the process going forward.</p> <p>The immediate next step is that we intend to announce the package for consultation â&euro;¦ including a preferred route between London and the West Midlands â&euro;¦ later in the year.</p> <p>The public consultation will then commence early next year.</p> <p>We intend it to be a thorough and inclusive consultation. </p> <p>Four of the most important issues it will cover are as follows:</p> <p>First, the principle of whether new high speed rail lines should be built;</p> <p>Secondly, the broad corridor for a new line;</p> <p>Thirdly, the detailed route.</p> <p>Fourthly, the approach to blight and how best to assist those whose properties are negatively affected by the proposals.</p> <p>Let me take this opportunity to repeat what I have said again and again on this.</p> <p>This is not a done deal.</p> <p>The consultation is an absolutely crucial part of the decision-making process.</p> <p>You can make a difference.</p> <p>You can shape the outcome of this process and the decisions that will ultimately be made.</p> <p>As the Secretary of State has said during his HS2 visits, he is keen for those affected to engage extensively on all questions under consideration.</p> <p>So the consultation period will certainly be longer than the period generally recommended by the Cabinet Office guidance. </p> <p>We expect it to last up to 5 months or thereabouts. </p> <p>And we intend to reach out pro-actively to the communities affected â&euro;¦ rather than just waiting for the responses to come to us.</p> <p>So HS2 representatives will be going out into your communities with road shows and seminars to enable people to find out more about the project and talk directly to the engineers, economists and others who are working on it.</p> <p>Once the consultation is completed, it will take time to collate and analyse the thousands of responses that we expect to receive. </p> <p>But our aim is to be in a position to announce the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s preferred strategy, and the route of an initial line if we choose to go ahead, by the end of 2011. <br /> <br />The next stage would be preparation of a Hybrid Bill.</p> <p>This would involve developing the full engineering design and environmental assessment as well as drafting legislation. </p> <p>We would also contact those affected to provide them with a further important opportunity to have their say during  parliamentary scrutiny of the Bill.</p> <p>Our estimate is that the Hybrid Bill process would begin in late 2013.</p> <p>Our objective is to achieve Royal Assent before the end of this Parliament and to begin enabling works shortly thereafter.</p> <p>I know that Iâ&euro;&trade;m unlikely to be able to convince most of you on the merits of high speed rail but I firmly believe that it has the potential to provide us with a once in a generation chance to transform the social and economic geography of this country. </p> <p>The question we have to grapple with is how to deliver these benefits without imposing an unacceptable cost on the local communities directly affected by the new network.</p> <p>If we here work together I believe we will be able to do that.</p> <p>I believe we can find the right way forward and reach the right decisions -  decisions which are fair to the communities represented at this meeting today.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:41.578350 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20101026 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP High Speed Rail Lobby Day Speech Department for Transport 26 October 2010 2010-10-26T00:00:00 High Speed Rail Lobby Day, Houses of Parliament, Westminster
<h2>Introduction</h2> <p>Thank you, John, for that introduction.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s a pleasure to be here today at one of the keynote events in the aviation calendar.</p> <p>This is the first formal opportunity I have had to engage with the industry since my appointment 5 months ago. Although to those of you who know some of the leading players in UK aviation it will not surprise you to hear that that does not mean I have been left unaware of the industryâ&euro;&trade;s views!</p> <p>Indeed, almost my first challenge as SoS for Transport was to learn to say Eyjafjallajökull. And as I spent my second day in the job shuttling between a windowless COBRA meeting room and a volley of thermo-nuclear emails from various well-known airline bosses, I was never in any doubt that aviation was going to be a key part of the brief.</p> <p>I want to address you this morning at two levels: of course as representatives of the aviation industry with very specific concerns about the challenges facing your sector, but also as business people with a stake in the success of UK Plc.</p> <p>Because I know that, as key figures in one of our leading industries, you will recognise the importance of getting our economy, and our public finances, back on a sustainable path.<br />â&euro;¦..</p> <h3>Economy / Spending Review</h3> <p>When the Coalition Government came to office, we inherited an economy teetering on the edge of an abyss.</p> <p>Britain was saddled with the biggest budget deficit in the G20 and had just limped out of the longest and deepest recession in our peacetime history.</p> <p>Every single day we are adding £400 million to our national debt.</p> <p>And if we had kept to the spending plans we inherited, British taxpayers would be paying out nearly £70 billion a year in debt interest alone by the end of the Parliament. And the debt would still be rising as a percentage of GDP.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s more than we spend on schooling our children and defending our country combined.</p> <p>If we were to keep interest rates low, dealing with our debts was unavoidable.</p> <p>Tough decisions had to be taken. And this Government is taking them.</p> <p>Immediately after coming to office we identified, and cancelled, £6 billion worth of planned public spending this year â&euro;&ldquo; by doing the kind of things that the private sector had already done a couple of years ago in response to recession â&euro;&ldquo; hiring restraint, a pay freeze, cuts to discretionary spend, renegotiation of contracts.</p> <p>Our Emergency Budget in June set out an ambitious four year plan to eliminate entirely our structural deficit and get debt falling as a percentage of GDP. And to do the majority of it by reductions in public spending, with less than a quarter of the fiscal consolidation being delivered through increased taxation.</p> <p>And because we understand that, ultimately, only strong economic growth can secure Britainâ&euro;&trade;s future; and we understand that in a global economy we will only secure that growth by being competitive.......</p> <p>......We announced a phased reduction in corporation tax, even at a time when taxes overall are set to rise.</p> <p>Recognising the crucial role that private sector businesses and private investment will play in Britainâ&euro;&trade;s recovery.</p> <p>We set up an independent Office for Budget Responsibility to bring honesty back to official economic forecasts.</p> <p>And five days ago, we reached the next major milestone on our journey to fiscal and economic recovery with the delivery of the conclusions of the Spending Review â&euro;&ldquo; setting out precisely how we will deliver the ambitious spending reductions mapped out in the June budget.</p> <p>We now have firm and fixed spending totals for government departments for the rest of this Parliament, alongside far-reaching reforms to welfare and our public services.</p> <p>And as we seek to cut the bills of a decade of debt, restoring the confidence businesses and individuals need to invest in Britain, we are prioritising expenditure that will set Britain back on the path to prosperity.</p> <p>That means investing in the future - prioritising the infrastructure that will secure long-term growth and a greener economy.</p> <p>And weâ&euro;&trade;re already reaping the dividends of taking early action to balance Britainâ&euro;&trade;s books.</p> <p>In just five months, we have moved from the danger zone with Spain and Ireland to safety â&euro;&ldquo;</p> <p>From our credit rating being in peril, to our AAA status reconfirmed.</p> <p>And with interest rates on British Government debt falling dramatically since the election and continuing to fall since the Spending Review announcement to a record low - demonstrating the restoration of market confidence in the UK.</p> <p>From being on the international watch list, to getting a clean bill of health from the IMF who described the budget as â&euro;&tilde;essentialâ&euro;&trade; to securing the conditions for sustainable economic growth.</p> <p>But now the hard work really begins, as we seek to build on that early progress, and implement the tough but fair measures that will get Britain moving again while adapting to the new economic reality.</p> <p>Laying the foundations for building a strong, competitive economy for the longer term whilst delivering on our climate change targets.</p> <p>I do not pretend that it will be easy.</p> <p>And we do not expect it to win us short term popularity!</p> <p>But we owe it to our children not to pass on to them the legacy of debt that the previous government ran up.</p> <p>The decade of irresponsibility is over and we are resolved to take the tough decisions that are in our collective long term interest and to see them through.</p> <p>Because we are certain that this is the way to a better future for all our people.</p> <h3>Role of aviation</h3> <p>So growth â&euro;&ldquo; green growth â&euro;&ldquo; is the key.</p> <p>And I see transport â&euro;&ldquo; and the aviation sector â&euro;&ldquo; as integral to securing that future growth.</p> <p>Our airports, airlines and associated industries generate billions of pounds of economic output.</p> <p>They also create, and sustain, hundreds of thousands of jobs, while bringing people, communities and countries closer together than ever before.</p> <p>Now, I know you have been through some tough times in the last few years.</p> <p>First, a worldwide recession that dented consumer confidence, cut passenger numbers, and hit jobs and profits.</p> <p>Then an Icelandic volcano that blasted millions of tons of ash into the atmosphere, leading to unprecedented airspace restrictions across Europe.</p> <p>Add that to an intense debate on the environmental impact of aviation, and the need to protect against the ever-present risk of terrorist attack, and it is clear that your industry has had its fair share of challenges.</p> <p>I accept that. And I know, too, that some of you harbour fears that this government  is somehow anti-aviation.</p> <p>So let me be clear: This government understands  the social and economic benefits of aviation. We understand the important role aviation plays in our economy. And we want to work with the industry to address the challenges of climate change so that aviation can play its part in securing sustainable future economic growth.</p> <h3>3rd Runway</h3> <p>We will not agree on everything. Our first act was to cancel the third runway at Heathrow. A decision that the majority of you will not support.</p> <p>Nor has it been greeted with universal acclaim by the wider business community â&euro;&ldquo; although it is also true that not all businesses favoured the runway project.<br />In taking that decision, we listened not just to business, but also to those who would be most affected by the local environmental impacts of proposals for expanding Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted.</p> <p>And we carefully considered the wider environmental impacts in the context of our â&euro;&ldquo; and our predecessorsâ&euro;&trade; â&euro;&ldquo; clear commitments on climate change.<br />I believe we made the right judgement call for the right reasons.</p> <p>No government with a commitment to carbon reduction targets can adopt a crude â&euro;&oelig;predict and provideâ&euro;? approach to aviation capacity while aircraft CO2 remains an unresolved issue.</p> <p>And no responsible government can ignore the local environmental impacts â&euro;&ldquo; especially noise â&euro;&ldquo; of airport development.<br />I hope we can now draw a line under the decision we have taken on runways and work together to map out how best to secure the future of the sector within the constraints that we have accepted.</p> <p>Ensuring that, while that decision marks the closure of a chapter in the aviation debate, it can also mark the opening of an important new one.</p> <h3>Better not bigger</h3> <p>Our immediate challenge is to modernise and improve our major airports â&euro;&ldquo; to make them â&euro;&tilde;better not biggerâ&euro;&trade;.<br />When you travel, your first encounter with any city is often through its airport.</p> <p>And, when you arrive in a country, the airport should say something positive about the kind of place that country is â&euro;&ldquo; a great place to visit; a great place to do business.</p> <p>Our forthcoming Airport Economic Regulation Bill will help ensure that this countryâ&euro;&trade;s largest airports always give the right greeting and leave the right memory.</p> <p>And we will achieve that through better alignement of the economic incentives facing operators with the interests of passengers.</p> <p>We will replace the outdated one-size-fits-all framework with a new regulatory licensing regime that is better tailored to meet the circumstances of individual airports.</p> <p>And we will give the Civil Aviation Authority a new primary duty to promote the interests of passengers and a duty to encourage investment â&euro;&ldquo; as well as new powers to tackle anti-competitive behaviour.</p> <p>Meanwhile, our South East Airports Task Force â&euro;&ldquo; chaired by my Minister of State, Theresa Villiers, and comprising key sector stakeholders â&euro;&ldquo; is looking at ways to make the best use of existing airport infrastructure and improve conditions for all users.</p> <p>The initial focus of the Taskforce is action at our three biggest airports â&euro;&ldquo; Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted.</p> <p>But we recognise the vital importance of Britainâ&euro;&trade;s regional airports in supporting the economies of areas outside London. Wherever they are located, all of our airports matter.</p> <p>So I am delighted that the AOA is a member of the taskforce â&euro;&ldquo; and I hope you will continue to play an active role in it over the coming months.</p> <p>And yes, Ed, it will be looking at UKBA activity and the roll out of new technology at the border as part of its work.</p> <h3>Policy framework</h3> <p>However, I also agree with Ed [Anderson] when he calls for the Government to provide a positive policy framework for aviation.</p> <p>I recognise the need for a policy framework which supports economic growth and protects Heathrowâ&euro;&trade;s status as a global hub as well as addressing aviationâ&euro;&trade;s environmental impacts, and it is my intention to develop such a policy framework over the next year or so.</p> <p>And I recognise that, just as we have done with strategic roads, we need a policy not only to address the situation we face now, but to be able to look ahead to potential technological changes that will affect aviationâ&euro;&trade;s future  environmental impacts â&euro;&ldquo; both local and global.</p> <p>Of course I will want to draw on the expertise of those who understand best the benefits and impacts of aviation â&euro;&ldquo; and the likely future development of technology.</p> <p>So in the New Year DfT will issue a scoping document setting out the questions we are seeking to answer as we develop this policy.</p> <p>Then we will  open a dialogue with a wide range of stakeholders to seek their views and to draw on their knowledge and experience.</p> <p>My intention is to publish a draft policy document for formal consultation early in 2012.</p> <h3>Climate change</h3> <p>Of course, any aviation policy framework we set out cannot duck the climate change debate.</p> <p>We must work together to create an aviation sector that continues delivering social and economic benefits, while reducing carbon emissions.</p> <p>The Committee on Climate Change has provided valuable advice about how reductions in aviation emissions can be achieved. And, building on this, my Department is working on a robust assessment of the abatement potential and cost-effectiveness of a range of different policy measures, which will inform our response to the CCC next year.</p> <p>Let me clear: just as with road transport, the enemy is not the car, or the motorist â&euro;&ldquo; itâ&euro;&trade;s the carbon.....</p> <p>......So with aviation, the enemy is not the airlines, or their passengers. The enemy is the carbon emissions.</p> <p>So I want to look at how we can incentivise the decarbonisation of air travel â&euro;&ldquo; and encourage businesses in the industry to invest in low-carbon technologies and fuels.</p> <p>How we can lead the global debate and shape a low-emission aviation sector of the future â&euro;&ldquo; without disadvantaging UK airlines or UK airports.</p> <p>So far, the progress thatâ&euro;&trade;s been made is encouraging.</p> <p>At the 37th session of the ICAO assembly, the UK led the way in pushing through the first global deal for the international aviation sector. The agreement reached wasnâ&euro;&trade;t perfect â&euro;&ldquo; we concede that - but it was an agreement and that in itself is a major step forward.</p> <p>And as Ed highlighted, thereâ&euro;&trade;s the AOAâ&euro;&trade;s own scheme to reduce ground CO2 â&euro;&ldquo; an innovative programme that will help airports, airlines, air navigation service providers and ground handling companies cut their emissions.</p> <p>Meanwhile, weâ&euro;&trade;re seeing the development of aircraft that pollute less and carry more passengers; the development of lightweight composite materials; more fuel-efficient operations; the future use of sustainable biofuels â&euro;&ldquo; all of these have the potential to make a real difference.</p> <p>With a new aircraft today typically using 70% less fuel than sixty years ago, it is clear that technology can and must provide a convincing answer to those who see demand management as the only solution in the medium term to aviation-produced carbon â&euro;&ldquo; just as electric and plug-in hybrid cars will, over time, provide a robust answer to those who say the car can have no place in future transport policy planning.</p> <p>If technology can play a role in mitigating the carbon impact of flying, so can it too in mitigating the noise impacts that are often the principle objection to airport expansion.</p> <p>Noise contours around airports have shrunk dramatically of course over the last 40 years â&euro;&ldquo; but at the same time, so has the tolerance of those who live in them.</p> <p>I want to understand where the industry believes it can get to in the next ten, twenty, thirty years</p> <p>I want to understand what technology is likely to deliver and I want to understand what scope there may be for noise-beneficial changes in operating practice, when and if the principle focus becomes noise mitigation rather than carbon reduction.</p> <p>Of course, reforms to aviation taxation can play a key part in changing behaviour. But letâ&euro;&trade;s be frank â&euro;&ldquo; they can also play a key role in deficit reduction. I know the industry has serious concerns about what these reforms might look like, their impact on route viability, and their interaction with aviationâ&euro;&trade;s forthcoming inclusion in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme.</p> <p>APD reform is, of course, a matter for the Treasury. But I and my officials will work closely with Treasury colleagues as the government develops its proposals.</p> <h3>Security / User pays</h3> <p>Security is and will remain a continuing challenge to the industry and the delivery of effective aviation security must be at the heart of the aviation policy debate.</p> <p>I have listened to your concerns regarding the need to reform the regulatory framework for aviation security. </p> <p>And I intend to develop a new regulatory system - one where the Government concentrates on setting the security outcomes that need to be achieved, and frees up operators to devise the security processes needed to deliver them in line with EU requirements. </p> <p>Further announcements, as they say, will follow in due course.</p> <p>It goes, I hope, without saying that all our policy objectives will have to be met from a reduced budget. Though in the case of transport, not nearly as reduced as I had read in the newspapers it was going to be.</p> <p>That is the inevitable consequence of fiscal consolidation.</p> <p>We must, of necessity, review everything that the Department does and ask ourselves the questions: does it really need doing? Are we best placed to do it? Who should bear the cost?</p> <p>Our plans to extend the â&euro;&oelig;user paysâ&euro;? principle will shift costs and responsibility for certain activities - sometimes to the independent regulator; sometimes to the industry itself.</p> <p>In some cases that will mean greater freedom and flexibility; increased scope for innovation. But with the flip-side being a direct responsibility for delivery in areas where government has previously sought to both specify and provide.</p> <h3>Conclusion</h3> <p>These are times of challenge and change â&euro;&ldquo; no doubt about it.</p> <p>But I know that the aviation sector has the talent, the capacity for innovation, and the determination to meet the challenges head on.</p> <p>I want to see you playing a full part in our future transport strategy.</p> <p>I cannot promise that we will agree on everything. But I can promise that I will continue to engage with you, with an open mind and an open door, as we develop our strategy for aviation over the coming months.</p> <p>Working together we can build a prosperous and sustainable aviation industry for the future. An industry that can support our economic growth objectives, without undermining our climate change targets.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:50.053781 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20101025 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP Speech to Airport Operators' Association Department for Transport 25 October 2010 2010-10-25T00:00:00 Airport Operators' Association
<h2>Introductory remarks  </h2> <p>Good transport can do great things â&euro;&ldquo; it can change our lives and our country for the better. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why this Coalition Government is fully focused on building a modern transport system â&euro;&ldquo; one that connects our communities and supports our businesses, one that is safe and reliable, affordable and accessible. And, of course, we are determined that such a system will also play its part in contributing to the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s climate change goals.</p> <p>If our transport networks are to achieve all these ends then first, last and always, they have to be sustainable. But the nub of my argument is this - if we are to achieve genuine transport sustainability, then we have to think of it as <span style="text-decoration: underline">three dimensional</span>, something solid and real.</p> <p>What are these dimensions? In essence, sustainability has three prongs: economic, social, and environmental. And itâ&euro;&trade;s that â&euro;&oelig;three part sustainability challengeâ&euro;? Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to speak about today.</p> <h2>Economic sustainability</h2> <p>Let me first deal with the economic component of this challenge.</p> <p>If anybody asked me to sum up the legacy bequeathed to the new Coalition Government, then Iâ&euro;&trade;d probably choose one word - â&euro;&oelig; <span style="text-decoration: underline"> <strong>un</strong> </span>sustainable.â&euro;? We inherited unsustainable levels of borrowing and spending which, together, added up to unsustainable levels of debt. </p> <p>Well you canâ&euro;&trade;t build a sustainable future for transport on the quick-sands of debt â&euro;&ldquo; in truth, living beyond our means is not, and never could be, a recipe for a successful and properly resourced transport system in the UK. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s precisely why this Government is taking urgent action to put the public finances back on track.</p> <p>The latest milestone on our road to fiscal discipline will be the publication today of the Spending Review. And that Review is much more than an announcement of departmental budgets â&euro;&ldquo; it is a programme for economic sustainability.</p> <p>So - what does that mean for transport as we move forward?</p> <p>Well, it means squeezing every ounce of value out of existing assets.</p> <p>It means finding innovative ways of funding expenditure and attracting investment.</p> <p>And it means making a rigorous cost-benefit case for each and every infrastructure project and proposal.</p> <p>It also means moving away from the top-down command and control system that has characterised government in Britain since the 1940s and giving power back to individuals, families and communities â&euro;&ldquo; what we call â&euro;&oelig;localism.â&euro;?</p> <p>These are not just common sense responses to the inherited debt crisis â&euro;&ldquo; they are the hallmarks of a genuinely sustainable transport system.</p> <h2>Social sustainability</h2> <p>The second dimension of transport sustainability is social.</p> <p>If access to transport is limited, if itâ&euro;&trade;s too expensive or the level of services provided is poor, then barriers can arise that prevent the least-advantaged in our society from taking part in key social activities and accessing essential public services.</p> <p>But, by ensuring the social sustainability of transport, you can break down these barriers. For example, when transport is socially sustainable:</p> <ul> <li>You can take the kids to school, and pick them up again, without having to rely on a car.</li> <li>You can get yourself and your loved ones to the GP or the hospital.</li> <li>You can hold down a job â&euro;&ldquo; or even get to the interview that wins you that job in the first place.</li> <li>You can journey to, from and around a rural area just as easily as you can an urban conurbation.</li> <li>And regardless of your age, physical ability or social background, you can use a value for money public transport service that gets you to where you want to go, and brings you back again â&euro;&ldquo; quickly and seamlessly.</li> </ul> <p>To put that more succinctly â&euro;&ldquo; at its best, transport is a vital rung on the ladder of social inclusion.</p> <h2>Environmental sustainability</h2> <p>So far Iâ&euro;&trade;ve argued that, when it is economically and socially sustainable, then transport can generate wealth and spread prosperity, reinforce community cohesion and open up life-changing opportunities.</p> <p>But I also recognise its impact on the environment we all share, especially in terms of CO2 emissions and also on air quality and quality of life - and, that means transport must also be environmentally sustainable. Indeed, for me, this is perhaps the most important and challenging dimension of the three parts of transport sustainability.</p> <p>I make no bones about it â&euro;&ldquo; I regard a low carbon future as the <span style="text-decoration: underline">only</span> future for Britain. What I reject though is the argument put by some that modernising transport, generating growth and safeguarding the environment are incompatible. They are not. With the right policies and the proper balance these ambitions are mutually reinforcing, <span style="text-decoration: underline">not</span> mutually exclusive.</p> <p>In my view, if we want to make real and lasting progress towards environmental sustainability then we need to recognise that a cleaner, greener future can <span style="text-decoration: underline">never</span> be built through coercion, or by government dictating which particular mode of transport people should use.</p> <p>Our goal must be to persuade, encourage and incentivise. And, to do that, we should use all of the policy levers at our disposal to make low carbon travel a genuine, viable and attractive choice for businesses and ordinary citizens.</p> <p>But thereâ&euro;&trade;s something else we have to do. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s tap into the potential of the greenest travel option of all â&euro;&ldquo; namely <span style="text-decoration: underline">not</span> travelling. From video conferencing to the innovative use of the internet I sense that we are on the verge of radical changes in how we organise our working day and our personal lives â&euro;&ldquo; changes that will mean less travelling and less pollution.</p> <h2>Policies &amp; programmes</h2> <p>A strong economy, a fair society and an environment thatâ&euro;&trade;s respected and protected â&euro;&ldquo; this is the prize offered by a truly sustainable transport system.</p> <p>But to deliver that sustainability, to make it a reality, you need an effective framework of policies and programmes. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s exactly what this Government has got.</p> <p>The way we appraise and prioritise is especially important. I&#39;ve said before that we will reform the way that transport projects are prioritised in England - so that schemes offering the best carbon efficiency and value for money are fully recognised. The revised approach will be launched after the Spending Review.</p> <p>Now in speaking to you today about our policies and programmes I could have pointed to our commitment to light rail as a flexible, adaptable and reliable form of public transport.</p> <p>Alternatively, I could have mentioned our efforts to work with industry stakeholders to de-carbonise road freight.</p> <p>I could have discussed our grants of up to £5000 to stimulate the market and encourage the purchase of electric and ultra-low carbon vehicles â&euro;&ldquo; an investment that would help to cut the running costs for drivers and businesses, as well as shrink their carbon footprint.</p> <p>Or, I could have highlighted our belief in Crossrail â&euro;&ldquo; a rail infrastructure project this Government regards as a significant growth generator, with real economic benefits that will be felt far beyond London.</p> <p>I could even have talked about our commitment to a high speed rail network - one with the potential to radically improve Britainâ&euro;&trade;s strategic connectivity in a way that both re-balances socio-economic development and makes an important contribution towards meeting our environmental objectives by encouraging a modal shift from long road journeys and short haul flights.</p> <p>But, instead, in what remains of my speech, Iâ&euro;&trade;m going to focus on something that runs through, and cuts across, each prong of the three part sustainability challenge â&euro;&ldquo; our new Local Sustainable Transport Fund.</p> <h2>Local Sustainable Transport Fund</h2> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already touched briefly on the key role of localism in transport. Well, we have recently announced our plans to underpin our localism agenda with our â&euro;&oelig;Local Sustainable Transport Fund.â&euro;?</p> <p>This Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s belief that transport is integral to supporting economic recovery, advancing social mobility and tackling climate change is reflected in our decision to establish this new Fund.</p> <p>We want to cut the congestion that gets in the way of jobs and business.</p> <p>We want to encourage people to make more journeys by sustainable, carbon-friendly modes of transport â&euro;&ldquo; from walking to cycling, from car-sharing to public transport.</p> <p>And we want to see better air quality and a cleaner environment, improved safety and healthier communities.</p> <p>I believe that our new Fund can help local authorities and local communities to secure all of these benefits. It really does have the potential to be a game-changing innovation.</p> <p>But thereâ&euro;&trade;s another important aspect of this new Fund that I want to highlight â&euro;&ldquo; namely that it is part of our efforts to simplify the myriad of funding grants that have been issued for various projects and purposes in the past.</p> <p>This system was centralised, bureaucratic and inflexible. It was synonymous with an out-dated, top-down, Whitehall-knows-best culture.</p> <p>So let me be clear â&euro;&ldquo; we will <span style="text-decoration: underline">not</span> be setting conditions as to what schemes we are prepared to support through the Fund, provided they are affordable, deliverable and meet the high level requirements of helping the economy and cutting carbon. There is no set menu.</p> <p>Instead, it will be for local authorities - working in partnership with their communities, with neighbouring authorities, transport providers and transport users, health service organisations, environmental groups and local people - to decide on the right solutions for their area. Solutions that will be efficient, effective and sustainable - solutions informed, shaped and driven by localism.</p> <h2>Concluding Remarks</h2> <p>I started my speech by arguing that transport sustainability was anything but a single issue concept. Itâ&euro;&trade;s about our environment - certainly. But itâ&euro;&trade;s also economic and social too.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s the three dimensional reality of transport, and delivering in each of those dimensions is the sustainability challenge we face.</p> <p>Will meeting that challenge be easy? Definitely not. It will be tough and it will be testing.</p> <p>So can we succeed? Absolutely yes â&euro;&ldquo; with fresh thinking, news ways of working and the right policy solutions it <span style="text-decoration: underline">can</span> be done.</p> <p>But success will also require partnership working.</p> <p>And when I say â&euro;&oelig;partnershipâ&euro;? I mean it. From the town hall to Whitehall, from the business community to wider civic society and from the high street to Downing Street â&euro;&ldquo; I want to see partnership for a purpose, partnership for progress.</p> <p>And believe me, both as a local councillor and as a Minister, Iâ&euro;&trade;ve come to learn that this kind of partnership working isn&#39;t some path of least resistance taken by politicians just to make life easier â&euro;&ldquo; it&#39;s actually the best way to achieve goals, realise ambitions and get results.</p> <p>Okay, if thereâ&euro;&trade;s one thing you learn pretty quickly in my business itâ&euro;&trade;s that the tribute, â&euro;&oelig;<em>I wish theyâ&euro;&trade;d gone on longer</em>â&euro;? is rarely paid to a public speaker â&euro;&ldquo; especially a politician.</p> <p>So it just remains for me to thank you for listening, to wish you a great conference, and to say that I look forward to working with you all to meet the sustainability challenge in the months and years aheadâ&euro;¦thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:12:55.967868 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20101020 Norman Baker MP Speech to the "Sustainable Transport 2010" Conference Department for Transport 20 October 2010 2010-10-20T00:00:00 GovToday Sustainable Transport 2010 Conference and Exhibition, Westminster, London
<p>Ladies and gentleman, distinguished guests, Mr Ambassador.</p> <p>It is a great pleasure to be here with you to celebrate what I believe is an important step forward for international rail travel.</p> <p>Sixteen years after Eurostar began offering services from London to Paris, the countdown begins today towards a future of direct high speed rail services from St Pancras International to other key destinations in Europe.</p> <p>The benefits of the services proposed are clear:</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m sure they will offer passengers high levels of comfort, convenience and reliability.</p> <p>Current services on HS1 have an average delay of just 6 seconds.</p> <p>The new services would give passengers greater choice, including competition with Eurostar on the Brussels route.</p> <p>They would help meet rising demand for travel between our two countries, and connect Europeâ&euro;&trade;s two most important financial centres.</p> <p>In strengthening ties between the UK and Germany and London and Frankfurt, they will supporting economic growth and increased cross border investment and trade.</p> <p>And they will deliver these important economic benefits in a way which is consistent with the governmentâ&euro;&trade;s convictions to reduce carbon emissions from transport and meet our goals on climate change.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve always been an advocate of making the switch from air to rail, and I am certain that these services will provide an attractive alternative to short-haul flights, as has proved to be the case in so many other parts of Europe with the expansion of high speed rail services.</p> <p>The UK Government strongly backs high speed rail as the most effective, efficient and sustainable form of long-range inter-city transport for the 21st century.</p> <p>Demand for travel between major conurbations in this country is set to grow rapidly over the next 20-30 years and we need a solution thatâ&euro;&trade;s fast, reliable and carbon efficient.</p> <p>The Government believes that high speed rail can provide that solution.</p> <p>Indeed, the commitment the Conservatives made in Opposition to high speed rail transformed the debate on this form of travel in Britain.</p> <p>Earlier this month, we followed up on that commitment by confirming our plans for a national high speed rail network in the UK, initially linking London, Manchester, Birmingham and Leeds.</p> <p>And linking airports such as Birmingham and Heathrow into the network will help support the growth of high speed services to European destinations.</p> <p>And we look forward to working with major operators like Deutsche Bahn and Eurostar to help open up and expand the market.</p> <p>Of course there will be tests and standards to meet in relation to safety, security and border controls, but the end goal should be worth the effort â&euro;&ldquo; achieving a vibrant, open and competitive market for international rail services through the Channel Tunnel.</p> <p>In conclusion, I would like to thank Deutsche Bahn and congratulate them for the commitment they have made to this project.</p> <p>And I very much look forward to being back here, at St Pancras International, in the future to mark the launch of the first direct high speed rail services between London and Germany.</p> <p>Thank-you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:02.051440 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20101019 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech for Deutsche Bahn Launch Department for Transport 19 October 2010 2010-10-19T00:00:00 Deutsche Bahn event - high speed ICE 3 train, St. Pancras International railway station
<h2>Introduction - Fleet&#39;s vital role</h2> <p>Thank-you Quentin.</p> <p>And thank-you ladies and gentlemen.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s a very great pleasure to be here today - and to be part of a conference that reflects the crucial role that the fleet industry plays in reducing carbon emissions from road transport.</p> <p>By some considerable distance, <span style="text-decoration: underline">you</span> represent the largest market for green vehicles in this country.</p> <p>Without the purchasing power of fleets, how could diesel car sales have grown so dramatically since the 1980s? How could hybrids have become a common sight on our roads today? And without fleets, how could we hope to establish sustained commercial demand for low carbon vehicles in the future?</p> <p>So fleets <span style="text-decoration: underline">matter</span>. But itâ&euro;&trade;s not just the size of your collective chequebook that gives you such enormous influence.</p> <p>It is also your pioneering reputation for adopting new green practices to reduce fuel consumption; for trialling cutting edge vehicle technologies on the road; and for helping to jump-start a wide range of green fleet management schemes.</p> <p>While much of the debate on tackling climate change focuses on long-term solutions, fleets are helping to make an active, practical and deliverable contribution <span style="text-decoration: underline">today</span>.</p> <p>So I am particularly grateful to Fleet News and the Energy Saving Trust for asking me to speak about the Coalition Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s plans for a greener road transport sector.<br /> </p> <h2>Greener economy - greener cars</h2> <p>In fact, the two biggest priorities of the Coalition Government are sorting out Britainâ&euro;&trade;s financial problems, and developing a greener, low carbon economy.</p> <p>We believe these priorities are complementary, not contradictory</p> <p>Cutting our spending doesnâ&euro;&trade;t have to be incompatible with a low carbon agenda. Some low carbon choices already offer outstanding value for money - as the fleet industry knows - so our future goal is a market for green vehicles that makes economic as well as environmental sense.</p> <p>Just as cars and vans are key today, so they will be key in the low carbon economy tomorrow.</p> <p>Fleets understand that no other form of transport offers the flexibility, the cost-effectiveness, and the ability to carry people and goods between two specific locations.</p> <p>The enemy is not the car, but the carbon.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why a key part of any strategy to reduce transportâ&euro;&trade;s emissions is making sure that the cars we drive are as clean and fuel-efficient as possible.</p> <p>In the short term, the majority of CO2 savings from road transport will come from improvements to conventional technologies, driven mostly by EU regulations on fuel efficiency.</p> <p>So we will continue to work with manufacturers - and with the European Union - to squeeze more fuel efficiency out of petrol and diesel cars and vans today.</p> <h2>Biofuels</h2> <p>Alongside more efficient vehicles, we also need to keep developing greener fuels - and there is no doubt that biofuels have an important part to play in the overall mix of measures to decarbonise transport.</p> <p>They remain a complex and controversial area though. And it is clear to me that, while there are many good biofuels, such as used cooking oil, there are also many biofuels which deliver no environmental benefits whatsoever, particularly when indirect impacts are taken into account.</p> <p>I have discussed these issues with stakeholders who have impressed on me their strong views - both about the benefits and also about other wider implications of biofuels use, such as concerns over indirect land use change.</p> <p>Given this, I believe that it is right that the Government should take some additional time to review this subject carefully, to ensure that policy decisions going forward are robust and stable, and so we can provide a clear long-term direction for biofuels.</p> <h2>Low carbon vehicles</h2> <p>Biofuels represent an important but limited evolution in the greening of the passenger car and the van.</p> <p>But we are also preparing for a much more revolutionary change...</p> <p>After more than a century in which the internal combustion engine dominated, the ultra-low carbon vehicle era is beginning...</p> <p>Order books for the first new generation, all-electric vehicle - the Nissan Leaf - have opened in the UK and the first vehicles will be on our roads early next year, imported from Japan. But with Government support, it will not be long before they will be rolling off production lines in Sunderland. And others will follow.</p> <p>Of course the take-up of ultra-low carbon cars will be slow at first. But we hope that fleets will play an integral role in establishing a market for these pioneering technologies, supported by measures such as enhanced capital allowances, low benefit in kind taxation, and vehicle excise duty.</p> <p>Indeed, some fleets are already helping to do exactly that. The Royal Mail, for example, is trialing electric vans, and Sky is seeing what the Plug-in Toyota Prius is like to live with. Within my own Department, the Government Car and Dispatch Agency is also testing five plug-in Toyotas and a Smith electric van.</p> <p>But to further support the development of the market for low carbon vehicles, we need to ensure that the right infrastructure, specialist supplier base, and customer incentives are in place.</p> <p>And thatâ&euro;&trade;s exactly what we are doing.</p> <p>We have confirmed our support for a range of R&amp;D programmes across the green vehicle sector.</p> <p>Through the Technology Strategy Boardâ&euro;&trade;s Low Carbon Vehicles Innovation Platform, we are working with key partners to deliver a strategic vision for automotive R&amp;D.</p> <p>We recently announced that a further £24 million is being awarded to six winning consortia of the Competition - making a total of £52million with contributions from business - all of which will make a significant contribution to greener vehicle development in this country.</p> <p>They include hybrid technologies; composite materials; and engines that recover waste heat energy; and the vehicles that will benefit include plug in hybrids for Nissan, Lotus and Jaguar/Land Rover, extended range electric cars, and a lightweight hybrid refuse collection vehicle.</p> <p>And through the Plug in Car Grant, we have announced consumer incentives for every ultra low emission car sold. From January next year buyers will receive a grant of 25% of the price of a green car, up to £5,000. And this will of course also apply to fleet buyers.</p> <p>Through these initiatives, we want to encourage motorists and fleets to embrace cleaner and greener vehicles. By encouraging demand, we will stimulate investment in mass production which, in turn, will bring down costs and further boost demand.</p> <p>And we are also committed to rolling out an effective infrastructure for electric vehicles - hence the inclusion in the Coalition Agreement of a commitment to mandate a national recharging network.</p> <p>Our Plugged in Places programme is helping us do just that. The scheme will provide valuable data about how and where people recharge their cars, so that we can get the design of the national network right.</p> <p>To date, £8.8 million has been awarded to London, Milton Keynes and the North East through the Programme. We plan to hold a second round of bidding in the autumn, and will announce the funding available for this second round following this monthâ&euro;&trade;s Spending Review.</p> <p>Finally, all this investment would be of limited environmental value if our power sources were unsustainable.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why our recharging network will draw fuel from an electricity grid that Chris Huhne is determined to make one of the greenest in Europe.<br /> </p> <h2>Reducing fuel consumption</h2> <p>Technology and cleaner fuels are important in reducing emissions, but they are not enough on their own. We also need to think about the choices we make, as individuals and businesses, about when, where and how we travel, and how we carry goods around the country.</p> <p>These choices don&#39;t need to involve big changes to our lifestyle, or to the way businesses operate. Simple adjustments to driving technique can have a big impact on fuel efficiency - and hence profitability.</p> <p>I know many fleets are already making significant reductions in their fuel bills by training drivers to drive more efficiently. This training can be delivered quickly and conveniently - as I found recently when I took a smarter driving course with the Energy Saving Trust.</p> <p>In less than an hour, the Energy Saving Trust can teach even the most experienced drivers how to make simple improvements to their driving style, and I am convinced it can help reduce most driversâ&euro;&trade; fuel consumption by around 15%.</p> <p>We want fleets of every type and size to consider eco-driving courses to keep fuel bills and carbon emissions down. In fact later today my Ministerial colleague Mike Penning will be announcing how we are going to work with the road freight industry to promote more eco-driving.</p> <p>I am also grateful to those fleets that are helping to support car clubs, and car sharing schemes that can not only reduce commuting bills, but also prevent the office car park filling up every day.</p> <p>And for short trips, nothing is more carbon efficient than a bicycle.</p> <p>I want more companies to offer bikes for local journeys - to help reduce fuel bills, cut carbon, and improve the health of employees.</p> <p>This is a great example of Coalition Government in action...both me and Norman Tebbit saying &quot;get on your bike&quot;.</p> <h2>Alternatives to travel</h2> <p>In the current economic climate, it is more important than ever to minimise driving costs - and if possible consider whether journeys are necessary in the first place.</p> <p>It is for this last reason that I have become the first ever Transport Minister to have official responsibilities for alternatives to travel.</p> <p>When this new brief was announced in the summer, I was rather pleased when it was welcomed by the Campaign for Better Transport as a &quot;huge step forward&quot;, and by the CBI.</p> <p>But to be perfectly honest, it is something that should have been done long before now.</p> <p>Just like the fleet managerâ&euro;&trade;s job, the job of a transport minister has changed.</p> <p>Today, you and I are not only responsible for getting people and goods from A to B.</p> <p>We are also responsible for the <span style="text-decoration: underline">impact</span> of transport. On budgets. On the effectiveness of business. On the environment. And on people.</p> <p>Within your organisations, you are absolutely pivotal.</p> <p>You keep your businesses mobile. But increasingly, you can also help identify alternatives to travel that can significantly reduce the costs of transport.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why in the months and years ahead I want to work with the fleet sector to support initiatives that can reduce employee travel.</p> <p>And why I am working today with colleagues at the Department for Culture Media and Sport, Department for Business Innovation and Skills and in other Departments to look at reducing the demand for travel, particularly for business.</p> <p>That might mean encouraging home working; staggering peopleâ&euro;&trade;s working days so roads and trains are less congested at peak times; promoting the use of high-speed broadband for both business and leisure purposes; and encouraging the uptake of video conferencing as an alternative to long-distance travel.</p> <p>Of course it is not the mission of the Department for Transport to stop people travelling, but unnecessary travel is expensive in environmental and financial terms and, if we can help businesses to operate more efficiently with a need for less travel, we will be advancing both their agenda and our own.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to thank Fleet News and the Energy Saving Trust for inviting me to speak at this important event.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to thank this industry for everything you have accomplished in recent years to help cut carbon emissions from road transport.</p> <p>The fleet sector has always been important, innovative and influential. But I believe you have an even bigger role to play in the future...</p> <p>Helping your businesses become more efficient, and better placed to compete as we recover from the economic downturn...</p> <p>Procuring greener, cleaner vehicles, and supporting the growth of ultra-low carbon technologies...</p> <p>Reducing fuel consumption, and improving driver training...</p> <p>And getting involved in broader schemes to cut carbon - like car clubs, or cycling to work.</p> <p>I look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead. So what we do as a Government helps you do your job more effectively. And so what you do as fleet managers helps me to do my job more effectively.</p> <p>Thank-you for listening.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:07.924766 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20101012 Norman Baker MP Speech to the Fleet News Green Summit Department for Transport 12 October 2010 2010-10-12T00:00:00 Fleet News Green Summit, Hurlingham Club, London
<p>Thank you for that introduction Giles and thank you also for inviting me along.</p> <p>I am delighted to have an opportunity take part in one of the keynote events of the transport calendar.</p> <h2>Bus friendly, bus focused</h2> <p>It is said that a myth can be half way around the track before the truth has even got its running shoes on.</p> <p>Actually, Iâ&euro;&trade;ve witnessed that for myself in recent weeks. You see, during this period leading up to the Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR), a myth seems to have gathered pace about the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s commitment to buses.</p> <p>Now, in some ways thatâ&euro;&trade;s perhaps understandable. After all, by its very nature, the weeks between the announcement of a spending review and its final publication provide a vacuum for rumour and speculation.</p> <p>None-the-less, it can be a touch frustrating when ill-informed guesswork is presented in some quarters as hard facts. Take the Bus Service Operatorsâ&euro;&trade; Grant (BSOG).</p> <p>In response to various stories doing the rounds on BSOG I made a statement in the Commons in June to reiterate my view that â&euro;&oelig;<em>the benefits of that grant are clear</em>â&euro;?. And they are - from helping to keep fares affordable, to attracting more people onto public transport, to incentivising fuel efficiency.</p> <p>Now of course, in terms of specific details about <span style="text-decoration: underline">what</span> we can spend and <span style="text-decoration: underline">where</span> we can spend it in the coming years, all of us â&euro;&ldquo; ministers, media and industry stakeholders â&euro;&ldquo; will have to wait for the unveiling of the CSRâ&euro;&trade;s contents later this month. And Iâ&euro;&trade;ll say more about this in a moment.</p> <p>Bus travel accounts for two thirds of public transport journeys. Buses are an essential public service â&euro;&ldquo; especially where rail travel isnâ&euro;&trade;t an option or where people are on low incomes and cannot afford alternatives like car ownership.</p> <p>So our buses matter â&euro;&ldquo; socially, economically, and of course, environmentally. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why you have a Minister, a Department <span style="text-decoration: underline">and</span> a Government that is bus friendly and bus focused.</p> <h2>The Status quo is not an option</h2> <p>You may have guessed thereâ&euro;&trade;s a â&euro;&oelig;butâ&euro;? coming â&euro;&ldquo; and here it is.</p> <p> <strong style="text-decoration: underline">But</strong>, that doesnâ&euro;&trade;t mean that I view the industry through rose-tinted glasses.</p> <p>First, last and always I am a bus realist.</p> <p>And, as a realist I know that, even though these days we live and work in a world where the only constant is change, there is one certainty that the bus industry must face up to â&euro;&ldquo; namely, that the status quo is <span style="text-decoration: underline">not</span> an option.</p> <p>If there is any lingering doubt that things can continue as they are without let or hindrance, reform or renewal, then that doubt is surely dispelled by one of the greatest challenges facing all of us - the inherited debt crisis.</p> <p>Imagine for a moment what would have happened if, on taking office, the Coalition Government had chosen to ignore the inherited debt crisis â&euro;&ldquo; if weâ&euro;&trade;d adopted a sit-on-our hands, turn-a blind-eye approach to the massive hole in Britainâ&euro;&trade;s finances.</p> <p>Well, on the spending plans bequeathed to us by our predecessors, British taxpayers would be paying out £70 billion in debt interest a year by the end of this Parliament - thatâ&euro;&trade;s more than we spend on educating our children, defending our country or policing our streets.<br /> <br />That would not just have been unsustainable â&euro;&ldquo; it would have been unforgivable. So, instead, we have taken action to get the debt under control and put Britainâ&euro;&trade;s finances back into good order.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already touched on the next step in our journey to fiscal discipline and economic growth â&euro;&ldquo; this monthâ&euro;&trade;s Spending Review</p> <p>Now of course, in terms of specific details about <span style="text-decoration: underline">what</span> we can spend and <span style="text-decoration: underline">where</span> we can spend it in the coming years, all of us â&euro;&ldquo; ministers, media and industry stakeholders â&euro;&ldquo; will have to wait for the unveiling of the CSRâ&euro;&trade;s contents later this month.</p> <p>But, whatever the outcome of the CSR, one thing is certain â&euro;&ldquo; the inherited debt crisis has radically altered the economic landscape. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s as true for the bus industry, as it is for every other aspect of our national existence.</p> <p>What does that mean as we move forward?</p> <p>Well, it means that the industry has to recognise that things are going to have to change â&euro;&ldquo; quickly, radically and permanently.</p> <p>So you will have to squeeze every last ounce of value out of your existing assets.</p> <p>You will also need to get more from less</p> <p>The Government is shining a light into every last nook and cranny of transport expenditure.  Everything is being examined and re-examined. Everything is on the table. There are no sacred cows.</p> <p>Now, before you take fright let me assure you of the central objective of government policy on buses - we want to see more people using buses</p> <p>Here comes another â&euro;&oelig;butâ&euro;?</p> <p> <strong>But</strong> we are equally determined that taxpayers and fare-payers should get the best deal and the best value for their money.</p> <p>And here are three facts which remind of us of just how important this issue is:</p> <p>Fact one - bus fares increased by 24% above inflation in England outside London between 1997 and 2009</p> <p>Fact two - bus patronage in England outside London fell by approximately 2% over the same period. Coincidence? I think not</p> <p>And fact three - public funding of buses has been increasing year on year. £1.5 billion of public money is now spent on buses each year, and that of course, excludes concessionary fares. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s a lot of money â&euro;&ldquo; itâ&euro;&trade;s a serious issue.</p> <h2>Progress but more to do</h2> <p>I recognise that there is much good work going on in the bus industry to improve services.</p> <p>Welcome progress is being made â&euro;&ldquo; but there is still more to do. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s because, as Iâ&euro;&trade;ve said, the Government has a growth agenda, not a cuts agenda, for the buses.</p> <p>And attracting new customers isnâ&euro;&trade;t simply about purchasing expensive new vehicles, as important as that may be.</p> <ul> <li>Itâ&euro;&trade;s also about improving driversâ&euro;&trade; skills leading to safer and more fuel efficient driving.</li> <li>Itâ&euro;&trade;s about providing good accessible information at bus stops, on buses and on-line so that people can easily find out about services.</li> <li>Itâ&euro;&trade;s about making sure the bus turns up at the scheduled time.</li> <li>And itâ&euro;&trade;s about continuing the good work bus companies are doing to train their drivers to deal with the diverse range of customers who use their services. Theyâ&euro;&trade;ve been huge improvements in the customer focus of train operators and Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to see that best practice spread to our buses too.</li> </ul> <p>All this will lead to good quality bus services which offer the best value for money to the customer and the taxpayer, and which driver up patronage too</p> <p>Whatâ&euro;&trade;s more, all of these things are achievable, even in these difficult times. But we must all work together to bring them about..</p> <p>That includes more partnership working between operators and local authorities. Operators tell me they want to work with local authorities and in some parts of the country this has been highly successful, in others area not so.</p> <p>By working together I am sure we can make the progress that we all want to see.</p> <h2>Climate Change</h2> <p>Just like the inherited debt crisis, there is another challenge that cannot be side-stepped or wished away - climate change.</p> <p>If left unchecked climate change imperils the future of our planet. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s not science fiction, itâ&euro;&trade;s science fact.</p> <p>And let me be absolutely clear â&euro;&ldquo; the focus needed to deal with the debt crisis can be neither reason nor excuse for taking our eye off the climate change ball.  Again, the status quo is <span style="text-decoration: underline">not</span> an option â&euro;&ldquo; either for the Government or for the industry</p> <p>So make no mistake â&euro;&ldquo; not only is this Government determined to lay the foundations for a stronger economy, we are committed to safeguarding our shared environment.</p> <p>Underpinning that commitment is a belief that public transport has a key part to play in offering people a cleaner and greener alternative to car travel â&euro;&ldquo; an alternative that is both viable <span style="text-decoration: underline">and</span> reliable.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s precisely why one of the first things I announced after taking up my post was an additional £15 million investment in low carbon buses. </p> <p>Buses help to ease congestion on our roads, as well as that, low carbon buses emit nearly a third less carbon than their conventional counterparts. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s a transport win-win as far as Iâ&euro;&trade;m concerned.</p> <p>Yet, as things currently stand, just 0.2 per cent of buses on the road are of the low carbon variety. So I want the bus industry to step up to the plate by doing all that it can to make these green buses the norm on our streets, rather than the exception.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m convinced that the £15 million of new funding weâ&euro;&trade;re providing gives the industry a key means of doing this:</p> <ul> <li>Firstly, because it will stimulate the market for low carbon buses by reducing some of the initial costs for operators.</li> <li>And secondly, because it will help spread best practice by requiring the winning bidders to share information with others in the industry.</li> </ul> <p>Thanks to our decision to stand in the vanguard of the green technology revolution over 150 new low carbon buses will join fleets throughout England - a move that will save around 50,000 tonnes of CO2  (over a 15 year period).</p> <p>The closing date for bids under the Round 2 of the Green Bus Fund was 5th October. We have received a good response and are currently assessing the bids. We will be announcing the winners soon so watch this space.</p> <h2>Localism</h2> <p>It was Ronald Reagan who, as only he could, said â&euro;&ldquo; â&euro;&oelig;<em>the status quo is simply Latin for the mess weâ&euro;&trade;re in</em>â&euro;?.</p> <p>Well if there was ever a status quo that has caused one almighty mess in this country then it is decades of centralism. Here too the status quo is not an option.</p> <p>Years of stifling top down bureaucracy and Whitehall diktat are being consigned to the political and constitutional dustbin by a Coalition Government committed to localism.</p> <p>For us, localism is the political recognition that the best form of government is the government that lets people govern themselves.</p> <p>It means that decision-making is devolved and power is dispersed.</p> <p>And it ensures that problems are more easily defined and solutions more easily developed.</p> <p>Localism works. Itâ&euro;&trade;s also important for the future of our buses. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s because it offers a way for local authorities and bus operators to work in a productive partnership â&euro;&ldquo; a partnership that helps improve bus services and attract new customers.</p> <p>Better bus services can never be delivered through a one-size-fits-all approach. Every local community is different.</p> <p>So, if they are to be efficient <span style="text-decoration: underline">and</span> profitable, then bus services must be designed to meet the specific of needs specific local communities. They must be individually tailored, not off the peg.</p> <p>This is what lies at the core of bus localism. But, as well as offering bespoke services, bus localism also means ensuring value for money. </p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m committed to getting the best deal for bus passengers and for taxpayers. I therefore I welcome the current Competition Commission inquiry into the local bus market. In my view, the Commission is best placed to consider the difficult questions about the level of competition between bus operators and whether the current regulatory framework for buses is the right one.</p> <p>My Department has already submitted evidence to the Competition Commission, and will engage fully as the process continues before its final conclusions next year.</p> <h2>Smart &amp; integrated ticketing</h2> <p>Before I conclude Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to talk about one final area where the status quo is very definitely not an option â&euro;&ldquo; the â&euro;&oelig;door to door journeyâ&euro;?.</p> <p>Todayâ&euro;&trade;s passengers demand and deserve a public transport system that is properly joined up in a way that reflects the demands of their daily lives.</p> <p>So whether, as I have, you call it the â&euro;&oelig;door to door journeyâ&euro;?, or you label it â&euro;&oelig;end-to-end travelâ&euro;? or the â&euro;&oelig;whole-journey experienceâ&euro;?, it is absolutely vital that we improve the journey from front door to final destination.</p> <p>And again, the bus industry must play its part.</p> <p>Innovations such as real time information displays at bus stops, or even something as simple as placing bus stops as close as possible to the main rail station entrance can make a difference.</p> <p>But I believe that one of the most important steps towards a more joined up transport network is smart and integrated ticketing.</p> <p>The Government wants this new technology to be rolled out more widely across England and so we have provided £20 million of grant funding to the nine biggest English urban areas outside London to support this.</p> <p>My Department has also offered a BSOG incentive of 8% for operators with operational ITSO smart systems on their buses.</p> <p>Additionally, we are continuing our support of ITSO Ltd as the organisation that can help facilitate the additional roll out of schemes â&euro;&ldquo; and I can tell you that we are working with Transport for London and their partners to achieve ITSO compatibility across the London estate.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m pleased to say that major bus operators are rolling out ITSO smart ticketing across their fleet â&euro;&ldquo; something that is good for integration and, as a result, good for passengers.</p> <p>I want to congratulate Stagecoach and Go Ahead in particular for announcing their plans to roll-out ITSO smart ticketing across their fleets and I encourage others to follow their example!</p> <p>Progress is being made on smartcards. But, Iâ&euro;&trade;m eager to see much more achieved. Indeed, my personal vision is of a system where we have seamless travel on one smartcard throughout the country.</p> <ul> <li>A single smartcard that you can use whether you are in Bristol on the bus, on the Tube in London or on the Metro in Newcastle.</li> <li>A single smartcard that lets you hire a bike or join a car club.</li> <li>A single smartcard that can be topped up in shops, online or by phone.</li> <li>A single smartcard that makes travel easier and cheaper.</li> </ul> <p>Is realising that vision going to be easy?  Well, itâ&euro;&trade;s certainly challenging, and it wonâ&euro;&trade;t be achieved overnight. Already, though, officials in my department are investigating how it might be done. Make no mistake â&euro;&ldquo; we are firmly set on this direction of travel.</p> <h2>Concluding remarks</h2> <p>Friends, in speaking to you today I have argued that standing still is not an option for the bus industry. There are reality checks to acknowledge, big challenges to confront and real changes to make.</p> <p>I realise therefore that these are testing times. But I also know that if anyone can be equal to them, then itâ&euro;&trade;s the bus industry and the people who work in and lead it. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why I look forward to working with you all in the months and years ahead.</p> <p>Thank you.<br /> </p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:20.147056 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20101007 Norman Baker MP Speech to Transport Times 2010 Bus Conference Department for Transport 07 October 2010 2010-10-07T00:00:00 Transport Times 2010 Bus Conference, ICO Conference Centre, London
<p>Thank you for that welcome, Antony.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m delighted to be able to join you today.</p> <p>Bringing together leading rail experts with specialists from other disciplines and backgrounds...this conference has become an important date in the railway calendar.</p> <p>In my contribution this morning, I want to explain why we need a reassessment of how we run our railways in this country.</p> <p>And I would like to outline the direction in which the Government is going towards delivering a pragmatic programme of reform to meet the key challenges of capacity, affordability and sustainability in the years ahead.</p> <p>Because the Coalition has put rail at the heart of its transport strategy.</p> <p>We fully recognise the economic importance of both passenger and freight services.</p> <p>And we also acknowledge that both freight and passenger rail can help us achieve our carbon and congestion goals.</p> <h2>The cost of the railways</h2> <p>The previous Government used to highlight again and again the amount of taxpayersâ&euro;&trade; money going into the railways.</p> <p>Between 1993 and 2009, the taxpayerâ&euro;&trade;s contribution to running the railway more than doubled.</p> <p>And there can be no doubt that the rail industry has achieved some major successes in the years since privatisation.</p> <p>The dramatic growth in passenger numbers is an achievement worth celebrating.</p> <p>And punctuality has gradually recovered from the post-Hatfield crisis to reach record levels.</p> <p>For example, the most recent industry figures show C2C delivering the best ever performance for a train operator with a PPM score of 98.8%.</p> <p>But while this is all very welcome, the inescapable fact remains that the cost of running the railways has risen dramatically over the past 15 years.</p> <p>In rail, as in so many other areas of the economy, a failure to achieve value for money during the boom years has left the country with some very difficult questions to address now the lean years have arrived - not least the largest budget deficit in Britainâ&euro;&trade;s peacetime history.</p> <p>And the painful fiscal hang-over weâ&euro;&trade;re suffering will impact on the railways as it will on all other areas of the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s activities.</p> <p>Our challenge is to deliver more for less.</p> <p>To deliver an efficiently managed railway that plays its part in the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s three biggest priorities:</p> <p>...re-energising our economy</p> <p>...addressing the debt crisis</p> <p>...and delivering our commitments on climate change.</p> <p>And if weâ&euro;&trade;re to do that we first need to find out why the railways cost so much to upgrade, maintain and operate.</p> <p>We are aided in this by the work underway by Sir Roy McNulty... who I gather is speaking at this conference tomorrow.</p> <p>Although the McNulty Review was an initiative set up by our predecessors, the new Government fully appreciates the value and importance of the study.</p> <p>That is why the Secretary of State asked Sir Roy to bring forward the publication date for his early conclusions.</p> <p>But even prior to publication of Sir Royâ&euro;&trade;s report...there are some important themes emerging from the long running debate on the future of our railways.</p> <p>It seems to me clear that we need greater clarity of the respective roles of Government and industry.</p> <p>And we need to find a way to give the professionals who run the railways more freedom to get on with their job without Whitehall looking over their shoulder all the time.</p> <p>In setting out a programme for change, Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to touch on three areas today:</p> <p>Firstly, reform of franchising.</p> <p>Secondly, a realignment of industry incentives and reforming Network Rail.</p> <p>And thirdly, cost effective delivery of upgrade and enhancement programmes.</p> <h2>Reform of franchising</h2> <p>Turning to my first theme, we recently published the consultation document on reforming rail franchising.</p> <p>The proposals are aimed at moving away from a system which sees Whitehall specifying highly detailed and prescriptive inputs in franchises.</p> <p>Let me emphasise that this wonâ&euro;&trade;t let operators off the hook on performance.</p> <p>Franchises let under the new system will set demanding outcomes for train operators to achieve - including standards to be met on passenger satisfaction.</p> <p>Those who fail to meet those standards will face sanctions.</p> <p>The shift we want to see is away from a detailed specification of input to a stronger focus on the quality of <em>outcomes</em> for passengers...</p> <p>...while giving more flexibility to the professionals who run our railways to apply innovation and enterprise in working out the best way to <em>deliver</em> those outcomes.</p> <p>We also need a more qualitative approach to assessment of franchise bids...</p> <p>...one which judges the quality of the overall package of proposals they contain to invest in the railways, reduce costs and grow passenger numbers...</p> <p>...rather than focusing solely on the binary question around the level of subsidy or premia to be paid.</p> <p>We clearly need to reform the cap and collar regime.</p> <p>The way the 80% revenue support system currently works is undermining one of the main reasons for involving the private sector in the first place - namely to harness its expertise to attract passengers to the railway and grow revenue.</p> <p>Both Coalition Parties have long advocated longer franchises.</p> <p>We expect 10 to 15 years to become the normal expected length,with the possibility of franchises running for up to 22 and a half years where significant investment is promised.</p> <p>And we are looking at ways to make it easier for operators to receive part of the value of their investment at the end of the franchise, to lift another barrier to private sector funding of the railways.</p> <p>I firmly believe that the increased certainty provided to train operators by a longer franchise will encourage private sector investment in the railways to help us deliver the improvements that matter most to passengers...</p> <p>...such as better services, better stations, longer platforms and better rolling stock.</p> <p>Longer franchises will also enable train operators to invest in the long term <em>relationships</em> crucial to ensuring the railway works well...</p> <p>...relationships with their workforce and with Network Rail.</p> <p>This advantage is often overlooked but is an important one.</p> <p>As well as providing greater scope to address long-standing industrial relations issues which may be just too difficult with a short franchise, this aspect of franchise reform can also make a useful contribution to our strategy on Network Rail and improve the interface between the train operators and the infrastructure provider.</p> <h2>Reform of Network Rail</h2> <p>And that brings me neatly on to my second theme today.</p> <p>We desperately need an infrastructure provider thatâ&euro;&trade;s more responsive to its customers, and able to deliver a high quality service at reasonable cost.</p> <p>And it is - of course - crucially important to have regard to the interests of both of Network Railâ&euro;&trade;s customer groups...</p> <p>...the freight operators as well as those who provide passenger services.</p> <p>I recognise that Network Rail has made some welcome progress in recent years, particularly on punctuality and reliability.</p> <p>But I am afraid that a number of mistakes were made when Network Rail was established.</p> <p>To keep the companyâ&euro;&trade;s debt off the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s balance sheet, a structure was created without strong enough accountability mechanisms.</p> <p>While I fully recognise the valuable work the regulator has done within the constraints of the current framework...lack of rigorous enough accountability mechanisms must be one of the reasons why the pressure to reduce costs has not been strong enough to deliver the efficiencies we need.</p> <p>Not even the high levels of taxpayer support we have witnessed in recent years have succeeded in turning the company into the modern, customer-oriented organisation that freight and passenger operators have been crying out for.</p> <p>That fact was driven home earlier this month when the ORR published international data which showed that Network Rail is still well behind comparable European rail infrastructure companies, with an efficiency gap of 34 to 40%.</p> <p>Now we all know that views tend to polarise whenever reform of the railways is discussed in this country.</p> <p>But it seems to me that a degree of consensus is starting to gather around the certain propositions.</p> <p>There is a widespread acceptance that a key driver of high whole-industry costs is the lack of a joined-up focus on costs and revenues, with no direct link between revenues that accrue to train operators and the infrastructure costs incurred by the industry.</p> <p>It seems increasingly clear that an important part of the solution to the problems we face rests in aligning the interests of Network Rail and operators more closely...</p> <p>...and providing more effective ways to get them working together to innovate and reduce costs. </p> <p>I have long recognized the value of a model that sees a more decentralised Network Rail, with its component parts working more seamlessly with local train and freight operators.</p> <p>Drawing on the conclusions of the McNulty Report, we will be working closely with the ORR to do more to unify and improve the way Network Rail and operators are regulated, and to help them work together more effectively.</p> <p>Our goal is to ensure the entire rail industry becomes more accountable and answerable to those who fund it...passengers, freight customers and taxpayers...all of whom deserve better better value for money in return.</p> <p>I believe that if we get this point right, it will be a very valuable step forward in addressing a range of other cost drivers and improve the industryâ&euro;&trade;s performance on issues like</p> <p>...asset management</p> <p>...supply chain management</p> <p>...and stations and property.</p> <p>And greater efforts are also needed to ensure that engineering work reflects the needs of the job at hand and not simply a one-size-fits-all manual of how work should proceed.</p> <p>We should also assess whether current standards which are uniformly applicable across the industry could be better adapted to the differing requirements of a railway network which performs diverse functions.</p> <p>And finally, it seems clear to me that we need a rational and objective appraisal of whether the railwaysâ&euro;&trade; very impressive safety record can be delivered in a more efficient way.</p> <h2>Major projects</h2> <p>But reform alone is not enough to ensure that the railways meet the needs of 21st century Britain.</p> <p>We must also continue to develop and enhance the network to address overcrowding and meet the longer term economic and environmental challenges of tomorrow.</p> <p>As everyone here will appreciate only too well, the programme of upgrades we have inherited from our predecessors is under review as part of the CSR process.</p> <p>The crisis in the public finances will inevitably impact on these programmes - some of which were promised without a clear idea of how they might be funded, despite the deteriorating public finance position.</p> <p>However â&euro;¦ there can be no doubt that where we get rail infrastructure projects right, they can be among the best value investments that the taxpayer can make - providing economic benefits many times their cost.</p> <p>The Chancellor made it clear in his Emergency Budget speech that:</p> <p> <em>â&euro;&oelig;Well judged capital spending by government can help provide new infrastructure our economy needs to compete in the modern worldâ&euro;?.</em> </p> <p>He also confirmed in the Budget that the Coalition would not seek additional cuts in capital spending over and above those already set by the outgoing administration.</p> <p>Now youâ&euro;&trade;ll appreciate that there are significant limits on what I can say prior to the outcome of the spending review.</p> <p>But there are some general themes that underlie our approach.</p> <p>As ever, we need to strive continually to improve Government procurement skills.</p> <p>For example, we need to learn lessons from the IEP programme, which saw over £26 million being spent in consultancy and preparation costs without even getting as far as contractual close, never mind any trains coming off the production line.</p> <p>And every programme needs to be tested and re-tested at every stage - and along every mile - to reduce costs and improve value.</p> <p>A prime example of the application of this principle is to be found in the Crossrail project.</p> <p>We have made clear our support for Crossrail, because we believe it can be a significant growth generator, with real economic benefits felt far beyond London.</p> <p>Construction work is under way, and highly visible at various locations in the capital.</p> <p>We are working closely with Crossrail Ltd and with the Mayor and TFL to get the very best return for money invested in the project.</p> <p>CRL has already been successful in identifying savings through reducing staff and administration costs and renegotiating IT contracts.</p> <p>You may have read of their further ideas on saving money with a more â&euro;&tilde;off-the-shelfâ&euro;&trade;train and re-design of a stations like Canary Wharf and Whitechapel.</p> <p>The ongoing challenge now facing all those involved in the project is to continue to find efficiencies through risk mitigation, more effective procurement, and value engineering.</p> <p>The same goes for Thameslink.</p> <p>Although this project has never attracted the same political attention as Crossrail...this important upgrade to the infrastructure of the south east can play a key part in relieving overcrowding and supporting economic growth.</p> <p>Major work on this project is now underway at Blackfriars and Farringdon and the first longer 12 car trains are due to start on the Bedford to Brighton route from December 2011.</p> <p>Progress is also being made on the long-awaited Birmingham New Street redevelopment. At long last the station is being transformed into a gateway worthy of serving the UKâ&euro;&trade;s second largest city. It is set to provide a major boost to regeneration in Birmingham and across the Midlands.</p> <p>Time prevents me from running through all the pending upgrade programmes.</p> <p>But I should highlight that we fully recognise the benefits that would accrue with the progress on the Strategic Freight Network.</p> <p>...and I would also emphasise that the Coalition Agreement affirms our support for further electrification of the rail network.</p> <p>...although the pace of delivery will depend on what is affordable in the current climate.</p> <h2>High Speed Rail</h2> <p>But the last of the rail projects I would like to consider today is of course, high speed rail.</p> <p>We will shortly announce detailed plans for a future high-speed rail network, with a view to starting a public consultation in the New Year.</p> <p>The commitment the Conservatives made to high speed rail in 2008 transformed the debate on the future of long-distance transport in Britain.</p> <p>Demand for travel between major conurbations is set to grow rapidly over the next 20-30 years, and we need a solution thatâ&euro;&trade;s fast, reliable, accessible, and environmentally sustainable.</p> <p>The work we inherited from our predecessors focuses primarily on London to Birmingham - but we also intend to set out a clear plan for delivering high speed rail to Manchester and Leeds.</p> <p>This will provide the foundation of the genuinely national network we want to see delivered in the future.</p> <p>Planned and developed by Michael Heseltine during the last Conservative Government, HS1 gives us a taste of what high speed rail can deliver.</p> <p>Integrating airports such as Birmingham and Heathrow into the new network can help us reduce emissions from transport by providing an attractive alternative to thousands of short haul flights.</p> <p>And there is every reason to believe that we will soon see new operators, including international carriers, operating alongside Eurostar, serving new destinations like Amsterdam and Frankfurt, and improving connectivity between London and Europe.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>Ladies and gentlemen, in conclusion, the days ahead are going to be difficult.</p> <p>I canâ&euro;&trade;t pretend that the Spending Review isnâ&euro;&trade;t going to hurt.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s impossible to escape from the conclusion that the level of public subsidy we have witnessed over recent years is unsustainable.</p> <p>Unless we rethink and improve the way we run our railways, we will be unable to deliver the service improvements and capacity enhancements that passengers want and that our economy needs.</p> <p>Costs have to come down.</p> <p>As a country, we have to re-learn how to live within our means, and the rail industry is no exception.</p> <p>Everyone involved in the railways - from senior management to the trackside worker - needs a stronger focus by on reducing costs, making it a key objective alongside safety, reliability, and capacity.</p> <p>The rail industry has achieved a huge amount since privatisation...</p> <p>...turning managed decline into a 40% increase in passenger numbers.</p> <p>I am convinced that you have the energy, the skills and the ideas to rise to the new challenges we all face in this age of austerity and some of which I have set out today.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:26.170013 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20100929 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech to New Civil Engineer Rail Summit Department for Transport 29 September 2010 2010-09-29T00:00:00 New Civil Engineer Rail Summit
<p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s a great pleasure to be here today, so thank you for inviting me along. Iâ&euro;&trade;m delighted to have this chance to make a small contribution to a big event.</p> <p>Groucho Marx once joked â&euro;&ldquo; â&euro;&oelig;why should I care about the future, whatâ&euro;&trade;s it ever done for me?â&euro;?</p> <p>Well, caring about the future is something we should all do. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s because weâ&euro;&trade;re the ones whose actions and decisions help to shape it. What we say and do in the here and now can often have an impact that lasts long beyond our own lifespan â&euro;&ldquo; and nowhere is that more true than in transport.</p> <p>So, in the brief time I have today, Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to look forward â&euro;&ldquo; to talk about the better future for transport that we all want to see and that, together, I hope we can help create.</p> <h2>Sound Finances &amp; A Strong Economy</h2> <p>The first thing we have to do is recognise that we canâ&euro;&trade;t build a better future on the quick-sands of debt. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s precisely why the Coalition Government has had to put tackling the inherited debt crisis front and centre of our priorities.</p> <p>What does this mean for transportâ&euro;&trade;s future? You will understand that I cannot reveal the contents of the forthcoming Spending Review. There are clearly going to be difficult decisions, but I hope you will have taken comfort from the fact that some key transport projects have already been given the green light by the Government, including High Speed 2 and Crossrail. This shows that this Government recognises the value of investment in our transport infrastructure.</p> <h2>Cleaner &amp; Greener</h2> <p>We are not taking our eyes off the long-term.</p> <p>The future must also be cleaner and greener â&euro;&ldquo;and that means providing genuine and viable low carbon travel alternatives.</p> <p>The Government is setting the pace in public transport by investing an additional £15 million in low carbon buses. </p> <p>As well as helping to ease congestion on our roads, low carbon buses emit nearly a third less carbon than their conventional counterparts. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s a transport win-win as far as Iâ&euro;&trade;m concerned.</p> <p>We have also signalled our support for ultra-low carbon cars. Already, we have awarded £24 million to further develop the UK&#39;s low carbon vehicle capability, which the Government believes will place the UK at the forefront of low carbon automotive development. Our Plug in Car Grant â&euro;&ldquo; up to £5000 â&euro;&ldquo; will help motorists and businesses purchase electric, plug-in hybrid or hydrogen cars. While our Plugged in Places programme reflects the Coalition Agreement pledge to mandate a national recharging network.</p> <p> <br />A cleaner and greener tomorrow will be one where cycling and walking is increasingly the norm in our cities and towns. But it will also be one where people have a real choice when it comes to travelling less â&euro;&ldquo; from home working, to video conferencing to a range of innovative ways to use the internet for business and leisure. These alternatives to travel encourages business to do things in a different way, which can save money and help the environment as well.</p> <h2>Joined up travel</h2> <p>Todayâ&euro;&trade;s passengers demand and deserve a public transport system that is properly joined up in a way that reflects the demands of their daily lives.</p> <p>So, whether you call it the â&euro;&oelig;door to door journeyâ&euro;?, â&euro;&oelig;end-to-end travelâ&euro;? or the â&euro;&oelig;whole-journey experienceâ&euro;?, it is absolutely vital to build a future where we improve the journey from front door to final destination by enhancing the connections between, and across, the different parts of our public transport system.</p> <p>Innovations such as real time information displays and improved directional signage can make a positive difference. As can simple measures like placing bus stops as close as possible to the main rail station entrance, or making sure that public announcements are clear and give the right amount of detail.</p> <p>But I believe that one of the most important steps towards a more joined up transport network is smart and integrated ticketing.</p> <p>The Government is very keen to see this new technology rolled out more widely and more quickly across England and so we have provided £20 million of grant funding to the nine biggest English urban areas outside London to support this. My Department has also offered a BSOG incentive of 8% for operators with operational ITSO smart systems on their buses.</p> <p>In addition, my Department has required that ITSO smart ticketing infrastructure be rolled out across the five rail franchises that have been tendered since 2007, and we intend to continue to introduce conditions to this effect in the remaining franchises as they are renewed.  We have also made it a statutory requirement that all concessionary travel passes in England are ITSO-compatible smartcards. Over 10m of these have been issued to date.</p> <p>Additionally, we are continuing our support of ITSO Ltd as the organisation that can help facilitate the additional roll out of schemes â&euro;&ldquo; and I can tell you that we are working with Transport for London and their partners to achieve ITSO compatibility across the London estate.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m also pleased to say that, not only are major bus operators rolling out ITSO smart ticketing across their fleet, but that smart ticketing is also being implemented by a number of key train operators â&euro;&ldquo; and that has to be good for integration and, as a result, good for passengers.</p> <p>The billing for this conference is â&euro;&oelig;Travel 2020â&euro;?.  So let me tell you my personal 2020 vision for smart cards.</p> <p>By 2020 Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to see seamless travel on one ticket throughout the country.</p> <ul> <li>A single smartcard ticket that you can use whether you are in Bristol on the bus, on the Tube in London or on the Metro in Newcastle.</li> <li>A single smartcard that lets you hire a bike or join a car club.</li> <li>A single smartcard that can be topped up in shops, online or by phone.</li> <li>A single smartcard that makes travel easier and cheaper.</li> </ul> <p>With smart and integrated ticketing, we have an opportunity to give passengers greater certainty over their end to end journey, and as a result increase the take up of more sustainable forms of travel.</p> <p>Is realising that vision going to be easy?</p> <p>Well, itâ&euro;&trade;s certainly challenging - it wonâ&euro;&trade;t be achieved overnight, thatâ&euro;&trade;s for sure.</p> <p>But can it be done?</p> <p>Absolutely. In fact, Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already asked my officials to explore ways of developing and introducing such a card.</p> <h2>Partnership for a purpose</h2> <p>Today Iâ&euro;&trade;ve spoken about the future.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve argued that we have no alternative but to put the public finances back on track.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve made the case for decarbonising transport.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;ve stressed the vital importance of improving the connectivity of our transport networks â&euro;&ldquo; especially through the use of cutting edge technology such as a nationwide transport smartcard.</p> <p>This isnâ&euro;&trade;t an exhaustive list of every last brick that we need to lay in order to build a better tomorrow for transport. But I hope the areas Iâ&euro;&trade;ve covered at least give a sense of the foundation stones we are putting in place to support that future structure.<br />Before I conclude Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to make one final point â&euro;&ldquo; and it concerns working together.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m under no illusions â&euro;&ldquo; this Government and my Department can only get so far working in isolation. If we are to succeed then we must collaborate in a productive partnership with the key stakeholders and major players in transport â&euro;&ldquo; people and organisations like you.</p> <p>So I want you to know that this Minister intends to listen to you, learn from you and work with you. Your ideas and input will be valued, as well as welcomed. And let me be clear - this is not partnership for its own sake, but partnership for a purpose because, ultimately, such a partnership is the only way to build that better future.</p> <h2>Concluding Remarks</h2> <p>Okay - when it comes to public speaking Iâ&euro;&trade;m always conscious of the wise advice offered by the 19th century Liberal politician Lord Reading, who said:  â&euro;&oelig;Always be shorter than anybody dared to hopeâ&euro;?.</p> <p>Well today you can be very hopeful â&euro;&ldquo; you have a jam-packed schedule and a busy day in front of you so, with Lord Readingâ&euro;&trade;s words ringing in my ears, itâ&euro;&trade;s time I brought my speech to a conclusion.</p> <p>It only remains for me to thank you for listening and to say that I look forward to hearing your thoughts and taking your questions in the Q&amp;A session.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:31.986059 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20100929 Norman Baker MP Speech to Real Time Information Group Department for Transport 29 September 2010 2010-09-29T00:00:00 Travel 2020 event, London
<h2>Introductory remarks</h2> <p>It&#39;s a great pleasure to be here this morning and I&#39;d like to thank the organisers - Cenex, the TSB (Technology Strategy Board), UKTI (UK trade &amp; Investment) and the SMMT (Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders) -for putting this event together</p> <p>I know this is now the third year, and although it&#39;s my first time here, I&#39;ve been hearing how things that were concepts in the first year became prototypes and design models in the second year and are now out there on the tarmac as real driveable vehicles in the third year.</p> <p>This is a fantastically ambitious trajectory and from what I&#39;ve seen already this morning I am hugely reassured about the capacity of human ingenuity to meet the very real challenge that we face to decarbonise motoring. Presented with that challenge, industry and academia are coming together to develop solutions; and develop them rapidly.</p> <p>I know there are some incredibly impressive examples being showcased here of a new breed of ultra low carbon vehicles -I&#39;m looking forward to seeing them for myself and perhaps driving one later on this morning.</p> <h2>Lazy rut</h2> <p>I think over the last few years we&#39;ve slipped rather too easily into a lazy rut that says of&#39; cows have four legs, therefore all creatures with four legs are cows&#39;. For motoring this equates to&#39;carbon is bad, we need to decarbonise, cars produce carbon therefore cars are bad&#39;.</p> <p>The truth is that the car has been one of the great enhancers of quality of life over the last few decades. Personal mobility, the ability to travel point-to-point on an individually-tailored timetable has been a huge boon and people are not going to give up the liberty provided by the car lightly.</p> <p>Fortunately, thanks to the technological revolution we are about to embark on, they won&#39;t have to.</p> <p>Yes we must tackle congestion on our roads and in our cities. And so we want to ensure that people can use alternatives for vehicle journeys such as high speed rail and public transport.</p> <p>But we need to recognise that, for many journeys, the car will remain the only practical and convenient choice. Which means we must make the car sustainable by decarbonising transport over the coming years.</p> <h2>Virtuous circle</h2> <p>So we want to encourage motorists to embrace cleaner and greener vehicles. That means creating a virtuous circle -one where, by encouraging demand, we will stimulate investment in mass production which, in turn, will bring down costs and further boost demand.</p> <p>And this Government is taking a number of steps to help establish that virtuous circle -let me highlight three of them.</p> <h2>Technology Strategy Board Winners</h2> <p>The first is the way we are working with key partners to deliver a strategic vision for automotive R&amp;D -e.g. the Technology Strategy Board&#39;s Low Carbon Vehicles Innovation Platform.</p> <p>And I&#39;m pleased to be able to announce today that a further £24 million is being awarded to six winning consortia of the TSB competition.</p> <p>The six winning projects have produced innovative solutions to the Low Carbon challenge. For example -there are hybrid technologies, composite materials, and engines redesigned to generate lower emissions and recover waste heat energy.</p> <p>And the vehicles cover everything from urban utility vehicles, to extended range electric cars, to lightweight hybrid refuse collection vehicles.</p> <p>This is an investment in projects that will deliver measurable economic benefits, as well as tangible environmental ones.</p> <h2>Plug-In Car Grant</h2> <p>The second area I want to highlight is our Plug-In Car Grant -from January next year buyers will receive a grant of 25% of the price of a green car, up to £5,000.</p> <p>Today I can announce the publication of the criteria that cars will have to meet in order to qualify for the Plug-In Car Grant.</p> <p>Our objective has always been&#39;real&#39; grants for&#39;real&#39; cars - cars that are safe and reliable; cars that meet the needs of real motorists and provide a motoring experience that&#39;s as good as, if not better than, the conventionally powered vehicles they currently drive.</p> <p>Now that we have published the criteria, I hope manufacturers will submit their applications for the cars they want to be accepted on to the grant scheme.</p> <h2>Plugged-In Places</h2> <p>The third strand of our approach focuses on infrastructure -and the importance of infrastructure to support consumer acceptance of electric vehicles is absolutely clear, hence the inclusion in the Coalition Agreement of a commitment to mandate a national recharging network.</p> <p>Parts of London, Milton Keynes and the North East are already in the process of installing recharging infrastructure.</p> <p>We plan to hold a second round of bidding for the Plugged -In Places Programme in the autumn and I have today released guidance to the 15places which have expressed an interest in bidding for funding - setting out in more detail what we want from these projects to support our decision-making on a national recharging network, so that they can begin the process of bid preparation.</p> <p>We will announce the funding available for the second round of Plugged-In Places following the October Spending Review..</p> <h2>Concluding Remarks</h2> <p>I believe we are on the brink of a critical transformation of road transport.</p> <p>The next 30 years will see a shift from high carbon to low carbon based road travel, as significant as the shift a century ago from the horse to the combustion engine. This, now regular, event is the embodiment of that process.</p> <p>Once that shift is underway, and clearly irreversible, policy makers will be able to plan for a future that includes the car -safe in the knowledge the benefits of individual travel will be available to future generations without compromising our carbon reduction goals.</p> <p>That is a significant strategic prize and this Government will continue to support the industry in attaining it.</p> <p>Thank you</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:38.269848 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20100916 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP Speech at Cenex Low Carbon Vehicles Event Department for Transport 16 September 2010 2010-09-16T00:00:00 Cenex Low Carbon Vehicles, Millbrook Proving Ground
<p>I congratulate His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, START and IBM for arranging this landmark summit, and in particular for dedicating this third day to the vitally important debate on sustainable transport. </p> <p>It&#39;s a debate that involves every level of government, from town hall to Whitehall.</p> <p>And one that affects every community, town and city across the country.</p> <p>A debate that concerns every business and employer and must engage everyone who has an interest in building a strong and competitive UK economy.</p> <p>And make no mistake - the Coalition Government is committed to the sustainability agenda in everything it does, including transport.  And of course, addressing the urgent and unavoidable challenges of climate change are a key part of ensuring sustainability. But, as inheritors of a deeply unsustainable fiscal and economic position, we are all too conscious of the fact that sustainability means so much more than simply &quot;carbon reducing&quot;.</p> <p>Sustainable solutions have, of course, first and foremost to be environmentally sustainable. But they must also be fiscally and economically sustainable - affordable to the taxpayer in the long-term and compatible with an economic growth agenda.</p> <p>And they must be socially sustainable as well - promoting social mobility and recognising the aspirations of the least-advantaged in our society and of the billions of people trying to improve their quality of life in the less-developed nations of the world. </p> <p>Cutting carbon - as important as it is - is relatively simple. Doing it in a way which supports economic growth, is fiscally sustainable and promotes social mobility and sustainable development is a far tougher challenge. Indeed, one worthy of the deliberations of this distinguished gathering!</p> <p>It is a little under four months since I became Secretary of State for Transport.</p> <p>It wasn&#39;t the brief I had expected, or prepared for in Opposition. It is not an area in which I had any special experience or expertise.</p> <p>So I faced the disadvantage of a steep learning curve, offset by the huge advantage of no baggage. No preconceptions.</p> <p>Over the summer, as I have got to grips with my new Department and this fascinating sector, and met hundreds of people, throughout the industry, whose job it is to keep Britain mobile, I have become increasingly convinced of the critical role that sustainable transport must play in helping to deliver this Coalition Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s core agenda: restoring fiscal responsibility; securing sustainable economic growth; achieving carbon reduction goals and establishing social justice.</p> <p>And the challenges we face in delivering that agenda are very significant. Over the last few years, Britain has suffered a near-catastrophic breakdown in sustainability.</p> <p>We have become addicted to unsustainable levels of public borrowing and spending; unsustainable levels of household debt; and an unsustainable failure to integrate economic development with environmental policy.</p> <p>That is why the Coalition Government&#39;s clear priorities are tackling the debt crisis and restoring sustainability to the public finances: rebuilding and re-energising our economy onto a path of sustainable growth, and delivering our long-term commitments on climate change in a way that is socially, economically and fiscally sustainable.</p> <p>And the Department for Transport can and must be at the heart of this programme.</p> <ul> <li>Contributing to fiscal consolidation through the effective prioritisation of public spending in the Transport sector and the vigorous pursuit of efficiency.</li> <li>Supporting growth by improving the links that move goods and people around our economy.</li> <li>Tackling climate change through policies which deliver technology and behaviour that will decarbonise mobility as we progress through the 21st century.</li> <li>And perhaps most important of all, embedding these changes by moving away from the top-down command and control system that has characterised Government in Britain since the Second World War and distributing power back to individuals, families, communities and local government - devising solutions to our many challenges from the bottom-up, rather than from the top-down.</li> </ul> <p>Having spent the summer thinking about these things, I approach these challenges with a positive outlook: I reject the proposition that we somehow face some kind of stark choice in transport between supporting economic growth and supporting environmental objectives. There is no either/or choice between generating growth and protecting the environment. Because neither growth which undermines our environmental agenda, nor environmental measures that stifle economic growth, will be sustainable in the medium term. </p> <p>And the technologies are already emerging from the laboratory and onto the factory floor that will help resolve the apparent dilemma.  By embracing them - renewable energy, electric vehicle technology, sustainable biofuels - we can not only make progress towards our carbon reduction targets, but can also build the basis of a more diversified and sustainable industry, based on these new technologies of the post-carbon era.</p> <p>That doesn&#39;t mean that technology alone will deliver sustainability: behaviour change will also be necessary - in the short-term because technological change alone will not get us where we need to be fast enough on the urgent agenda of greenhouse gas reduction, but in the longer-term because other elements of a sustainable transport solution - in particular, dealing with congestion - cannot be solved by technological advance alone.</p> <p>So my Team at the DfT is clear, our task in the months ahead is to develop a set of transport policies that will contribute to a genuinely sustainable society: promoting green growth within a framework of local devolution, fiscal stability and social mobility.</p> <p>We have already made a start.</p> <p>One of our first actions on coming into office was to cancel the third runway at Heathrow and to make it clear that this Government will not support planning applications for further runways at Stansted or Gatwick.</p> <p>That is not because we are &quot;anti-aviation&quot;. Far from it. But it is because we recognise, firstly, that the local environmental impacts of ever-increasing usage of the South East&#39;s key airports outweigh the potential benefits, and secondly, that until technology delivers very significant reductions in aviation CO2 emissions, capacity expansion is simply incompatible with our goals on climate change.</p> <p>Instead, we will focus scarce airport capacity on maintaining Heathrowâ&euro;&trade;s vital role as a global hub airport.</p> <p>And by committing ourselves to a High-Speed Rail network - linking the major English conurbations by dedicated High-Speed Rail lines with onward links to Scotland and Wales - we can offer a real alternative to domestic air travel so that, just as flying between Paris and Brussels has all but ceased, rail will become the preferred mode of travel for the overwhelming majority of passengers between London and its hub airport and Britainâ&euro;&trade;s great provincial cities.</p> <p>We will announce very soon detailed plans for the High-Speed Rail programme, which will be put forward for public consultation in the New Year. The first phase will run from London to Birmingham, but we will also set out a clear timetable for the extension of the network to Manchester and Leeds, with onward connections to the North East and Scotland.</p> <p>And, mindful of the principles of sustainability, our aim will be to balance the benefits of High-Speed Rail to the wider community with the local environmental impacts of the line. Through careful mitigation measures, I am convinced that the most intrusive local impacts can be eliminated and a solution found which is balanced and fair.</p> <p>So we see High-Speed Rail forming the backbone of one of our key transport networks for the 21st century. And the wider rail network can also play a key role in delivering reduced carbon footprint and greater mobility - but only if we can make it affordable. We have one of the most expensive railways in the world. More expensive to build, more expensive to operate and more expensive to ride on than any comparable system. That is not acceptable.  The taxpayer is contributing almost as much as the farepayer - and the farepayer is paying a lot more than his international comparators.</p> <p>So a sustainable railway isnâ&euro;&trade;t just one which is safe, which is reliable and which is electrified to reduce its carbon footprint. It must also be one which offers value to its passengers and is deliverable with levels of taxpayer subsidy which are affordable in the long-run.</p> <p>So another key task of my Department will be to review and reform the way the rail industry functions. Building on the work of Sir Roy McNultyâ&euro;&trade;s value-for-money study, to drive efficiency in rail investment and operations so that the railway can play its crucial part in delivering sustainable transport for the future.</p> <p>But while railways have enjoyed a massive increase in passenger usage and a surge in passenger satisfaction with them, we cannot ignore the fact that 84 percent of all journeys in the UK are made by car. The roads represent our most important network and the overwhelming bulk of our total network assets. For long-distance, inter-urban journeys, our challenge is to make the train the mode of choice. For short-distance urban travel, our challenge is to make public transport or low-impact modes such as walking and cycling the most attractive options. But for intermediate journeys involving complex routing across rural and suburban areas, there is no realistic prospect of displacing the private car through persuasion rather than coercion. </p> <p>And I do not favour coercion as a solution. </p> <p>Whether we like it or not, the ability to travel point-to-point on an individually-tailored timetable is one of the great quality-of-life gains of the second half of the 20th century - and not one that people will give up without a fight.</p> <p>And the good news is, they won&#39;t have to. </p> <p>After years when the carbon reduction agenda has placed the motorist firmly on the naughty step, we are on the brink of a technological revolution that really will transform the way we see motoring in the 21st century. It won&#39;t solve the problem of urban congestion - which can only be tackled through behaviour change. And it will not, in most cases, make motoring the sensible choice for long-distance inter-urban journeys against High-Speed Rail. But it will allow the benefits that the private car delivers in rural and suburban areas and for medium-distance complex journeys to be enjoyed by future generations, without destroying the planet in the process.</p> <p>Order books for the first new generation, all-electric vehicle - the Nissan Leaf - opened in the UK this month and the first vehicles will be on our roads early next year. Imported from Japan. But with Government support, by 2012 they will be rolling off production lines in Sunderland. And others will follow.</p> <p>The Government&#39;s commitment, even in the face of severe public spending restraint, to direct consumer subsidies to kick-start the market for low-carbon vehicles has ensured that Britain is the principle European launch market for global manufacturers. Our Plugged-In Places programme - rolling out public charging infrastructure in London, Milton Keynes and Newcastle - will allow us to gather important information about the way people use electric cars. </p> <p>Our commitment to mandate a public charging infrastructure across the country will ensure the UK remains in the vanguard of the electric vehicle revolution.</p> <p>And the plug-in hybrid vehicles being developed both in Britain and abroad, promise a practical solution that will be completely carbon-free for the short trips which make up the overwhelming majority of car journeys, while offering the possibility of greater range when longer journeys are necessary.</p> <p>The de-carbonisation of motoring, ironically, presents policymakers with some more complex decisions. For the last few years, it&#39;s been easy: rail good; roads bad: the carbon impact of motoring dramatically reduced the measured benefits of road network investment.</p> <p>But the investments we will make over the coming years from an extremely limited pot of public capital will need to last us not just for a Parliament or two but for generations to come. And alongside our plans for a High-Speed Rail network, we must look carefully at where investment in our road infrastructure will make sense in a future of decarbonised surface transport.</p> <p>And since resilience is an integral part of sustainability, it seems to me to be desirable to have at least two alternative practical modes of transport between any two population centres. Just in case Bob Crow has a son.</p> <p>The road to decarbonisation will not, of course, always be smooth. The story of biofuel perhaps illustrates that truth better than any.  Once the great hope for transport decarbonisation, the biofuel story has led to early disappointments. And emphasised in spades that sustainability is about the total impact of an activity, not merely the first order effects. </p> <p>But, depending on the volumes of biofuels that can be produced on a sustainable basis, they should indeed provide technical solutions to the mitigation of aviation emissions. And perhaps be able to contribute to decarbonising that element of heavy freight which cannot be moved from roads to rail - the final miles of delivery from depot to high street.</p> <p>So much for our National Networks. But most journeys, of course, are made not on those national networks, but on our local roads and it is at local level that most can be done to change patterns of behaviour and to create more genuinely sustainable transport modes while stimulating urban regeneration, economic growth and social integration at the same time:</p> <p>Light rail and tram schemes that link outlying and isolated estates with wealth-creating city centres.</p> <p>Cycling initiatives that transform peoplesâ&euro;&trade; way of travelling around urban centres.</p> <p>Attractive, air-conditioned buses running on prioritised routes that have the kind of appeal to passengers that metro systems have traditionally enjoyed.</p> <p>Smart cards to make multi-modal journeys easy and seamless.</p> <p>All of these types of scheme, when carefully thought-out and properly implemented, demonstrate extraordinarily high value-for-money.  But they all have something else in common: they are essentially local.</p> <p>That means they cannot be mandated from Whitehall. They have to be devised, developed, owned, promoted and implemented locally. </p> <p>That is why, as a key part of our local transport agenda, we want to devolve as much responsibility  for local transport initiatives as possible to local level. By the end of this Parliament,  I want to see far fewer civil servants sitting in my Department evaluating, monitoring and appraising transport schemes proposed by local authorities in Bradford, Birmingham or Bristol.</p> <p>The Government is inviting proposals from local authorities to form Local Enterprise Partnerships. My Department will seek to work with them, either individually or in strategic consortia, delegating decision making to them to allow them to develop truly innovative transport solutions. </p> <p>Sustainable local transport will depend on solutions invented in the place it serves. Solutions tailored for the specific needs and behaviour patterns of individual communities.</p> <p>Addressing congestion, urban regeneration, social integration, road safety, air quality and local environmental and carbon reduction targets as part of a single integrated agenda. </p> <p>Delivering solutions - not ticking boxes on a Government form. </p> <p>What local communities need is answers to problems, not poorly-designed, 18-inch wide cycle lanes, laid down roads that go nowhere simply to meet some target in a plan handed down from Whitehall.</p> <p>So - national network solutions, technological change and local problem solving.</p> <p>But you might be surprised to know that the most innovative change we have made in the Department for Transport in the last four months is to introduce a portfolio responsibility for â&euro;&oelig;non-travelâ&euro;?. </p> <p>Promoting alternatives to travel is a key part of the sustainability agenda. And although it has not traditionally been thought of as a transport responsibility, I have decided that we should integrate it into our transport agenda. So my colleague, Norman Baker, is working with colleagues at DCMS, in BIS and in other Departments to look at reducing the demand for travel, particularly for business.<br /> <br />Encouraging home working; promoting the use of high-speed broadband for both business and leisure purposes and encouraging the uptake of video conferencing as an alternative to long-distance travel.</p> <p>No, it is not the mission of the Department for Transport to stop people travelling, but unnecessary travel is expensive in environmental and financial terms and, if we can help businesses to understand the opportunities to operate efficiently with a need for less travel, we will be advancing both their agendas and our own.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>We face huge challenges in refocusing Britain&#39;s economy to a sustainable future.</p> <p>Years ago, long before Irelandâ&euro;&trade;s motorways were built, I was driving across that country with a colleague to a meeting on the west coast.<br />We stopped in a small town in the Irish Midlands to ask directions of an elderly farmer.</p> <p>&quot;How would you get to Sligo&quot; I asked.</p> <p>&quot;Well, you wouldnâ&euro;&trade;t start from here&quot;, was his instant reply.</p> <p>That is sometimes how I feel about the challenges the Coalition faces. But &quot;here&quot; is where we have to start from.</p> <p>And in Transport, we are clear that we have a vital part to play in addressing the challenges of the fiscal deficit, declining economic competitiveness, climate change and social exclusion.</p> <p>Those challenges call for a genuinely sustainable policy response: A response that recognises the need for carbon reduction, fiscal discipline, economic growth, social justice and genuine localism.</p> <p>Not one, or some of them,  But all of them. Together. In every policy initiative.</p> <p>In four months we have made a start.</p> <p>But we are under no illusion about the scale of the challenge ahead. But if we want Britain to have a sustainable, prosperous future, there is not a moment to lose.</p> <p>The time has come to face up to our problems. To get our heads out of the sand. To recognise, and learn from, our past failures. And to get on with the job of building a sustainable future for Britain without further delay.</p> <p>And that is precisely what this Government intends to do.</p> <p>Thank You.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:44.263513 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20100910 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP Sustainable transport Department for Transport 10 September 2010 2010-09-10T00:00:00 IBM START Conference: Business Summit
<p>Thank you very much indeed. I confess that although I have been using the Department&#39;s Brompton and dispensing with the Ministerial car, I thought the Oval was too far to come by bike so I did come by tube. As a cricket fan I have to confess shame-facedly it is my first visit to the Oval, which led to a rather surreal experience getting off the tube and being told this station is Oval when clearly it wasn&#39;t. However I am over that. It reminds me there is quirkiness in transport and one of the joys I remember from walking down Whitehall was to see a couple of American tourists see the sign that said &#39;Subway&#39; and saying &quot;lets get the subway&quot;, wandering in and come out the other side finding no tube. Such is life.</p> <p>Anyway enough of that, and on to more serious matters. I suppose we should start with the usual government health warning which is to talk about the deficit. If you wish to groan please do so now. We do have an enormous financial situation to deal with. Had we not taken action we would, at the end of this Parliament, be spending on interest payments alone £70 billion a year. That is simply completely untenable so we had to take quick action. The way I describe it is like if you are running a car which is dangerously low on oil and if we carry on like that the car would eventually explode. You have to stop the car, top up the oil, give it a service, and put it back on the road. That is what we are doing at the moment to try to make sure we can go forward on a sensible basis.</p> <p>If I could just mention one or two facts so that you are aware of where we are going on the Spending Review. The Department for Transport committed itself to a reduction of £683 million this year; including sadly £309 million from grants to local authorities, and of course the major transport schemes the department have been suspended pending the Spending Review. But I want to make it absolutely clear that the Government&#39;s view, not just the department&#39;s view but the Government&#39;s view, is that spending on transport, particularly capital, projects is essential if we are going to move forward and help rebuild the economy. There is a very high correlation between transport spend and the positive impact it has on the economy and that is why the Secretary of State said just the other day, and I quote him &quot;just because our priority is to deal with the debt crisis this does not mean we neglect our central responsibility to provide Britain with transport that works effectively and efficiently and to increase transport capacity where it is most needed to meet long term increases in demand&quot;.</p> <p>So that is what we are trying to do. We are trying to make sure when we come out of this and when the smoke clears on the Spending Review, that we are in a good position to go forward with capital projects. Now the timetable for that is that the submissions have gone in from the Department, and indeed every Department, to the Treasury. They will be analysed over the summer (so if you are a Treasury official I am afraid you are not having much of a holiday this August) and the Chancellor will announce on 20 October the departmental allocations. At that stage we will be able to take a view on where we go forward with our particular budget and what we could sensibly prioritise at that point. So hopefully by the end of the year we will all be clear both on allocations for local government as a matter of fact, and also on allocations within the Department on the terms of those priorities.</p> <p>In parallel with that process, what we are also doing in line with the coalition agreement is reviewing the way that transport schemes are prioritised. We are looking at the formula, the NATA (New Approach to Transport Appraisal) which determines the cost benefit ratio of schemes because our view is that the formula isn&#39;t necessarily one which produces the right result in this day and age. You will be aware of the problems with that if, for example, you have a railway scheme and you abstract traffic then that has been counted against the railway scheme on the basis that the Chancellor loses fuel duty revenue. That clearly is a nonsensical consequence. So those sorts of idiocies are being removed from the formula. So that is going on in parallel so we hope to be able to apply a better formula at the time when we know how much money we have got in order to be able to prioritise sensibly at that stage.</p> <p>Now the two overriding challenges that we face, or targets we set ourselves, for government as a whole. One is to rebuild the economy, as I have just been referring to. Without job creation from the private sector in particular, we aren&#39;t going to be able to deliver the sort of things in the public sector we want to deliver. So that is obviously key. The second issue is to reduce carbon emissions, recognising the challenge of climate change and the enormous difficulties in the transport sector. In particular because although business, for example, has been reducing its carbon emissions, those in the transport sector have been increasing and we have to get a hold on that and that leads us to I think looking on how we deliver transport.</p> <p>Now obviously in the longer term we want to look at cleaning up vehicles. The Secretary of State in particular is very keen on seeing what we can do to move towards cleaner and possibly electric vehicles. But we could also make our transport systems cleaner and I am conscious that a very large proportion of journeys are actually of 5 miles and under or indeed 2 miles or under which may be very relevant, I would suggest, to this particular audience. So I will come back to that in a moment.</p> <p>But I also want to talk now about the other strand which you will see running through Government policy in all shapes and forms and all departments which is the ideal localism. Now governments have always talked about localism in my experience. They don&#39;t do much about it but I remember, thank you for your introduction, not just being a County Councillor and actually Vice Chair of the Highways Committee I should mention, but also Leader of my District Council and indeed the Parish Council for 16 years. In fact I added it up the other day and I have been in Public Office for 49 years if you multiply these things together. So I am very committed to local government and I used to find it deeply frustrating to get done what we wanted to do and we thought that we knew best which I think we did do! I think to find that there was some regulation somewhere, some restrictions and some requirement to fill in a form. There was some Ministerial approval required and I found that deeply restrictive. We are going to get rid of all that. The ring fencing of money is going to be going. The extension of power down to local councils is coming. The Review for local finance is on its way and those of you in local government are going to see a transformation in terms of what you have to deal with and the ability you will have to shape your own areas in a way you should have been able to do so for many many years, but you will be able to do so in the future.</p> <p>Now let me announce something today on local transport plans. We think development of local transport plans is crucial and of course you will be aware you have a statutory duty to produce your LTPs by next April 2011. We happen to think that local transport plans remain the best way for authorities to plan transport strategy and delivery and will ensure from our point of view that funding allocations are available in good time for completion of those plans by next April. We also think local transport plans are the best way to make sure that funding is spent efficiently and effectively and enables you to focus on the priorities not just the economy and carbon reductions referred to but also road safety are affordability and accessibility people&#39;s health and well being for example. But I have just been talking about localism so here is what we are going to do about this. In line with this commitment to localism my Department no longer seeking to intervene in the way local authorities review their progress against local transport plans. As far as we are concerned, it is entirely a matter for you. We will no longer require reports or reviews for Central Government in terms of what you are doing. You will have to get a 2011 plan there but after that running a plan that is in place which is your legal requirement is up to you what you do about that. We think they are a good tool and we think you will want to use them but we will no be restrictive in terms of how you use them. We want to help you prioritise transport schemes that offer the best outcomes to tax payers, business growth, passengers and the environment.</p> <p>Now as you probably know we are also scrapping the Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) and are inviting local groups to form local enterprise partnerships (LEPs) to help boost development and strengthen local economy. LEPs are now taking ship shape across the country to manage responsibilities including transport and infrastructure. The requirements for the next few years will make it important for authorities to work together to identify where there is scope for efficiencies and savings and although this is going to be a very tough time for us all whether in Central or Local Government in terms of finances I hope that we will all nationally and locally look to see whether we can generally make savings, for example, by common procurement, rather than by cutting something at the front end like an important bus service which is easier and obvious you can do that very quickly. We have got to be creative, all of us, in terms of how we use the money which is there.</p> <p>Now transport is no respecter of local authority boundaries which you will appreciate which is why under this Government there will be lots of opportunities for a neighbouring authority to plan and prioritise transport schemes over wider economic regions so I hope all areas across England will consider the potential offer by LEPs to improve the quality and value to local transport services. My department will be keen to engage with effective partnerships wherever there are strategic issues to be considered.</p> <p>Let me just say something now very quickly on buses and I do so because I am conscious that buses are the predominant form of public transport. Railways get a lot of coverage and they are very important. They are always in the newspapers, buses less so. Actually buses are the predominant form of transport. They are also the form of transport used by those with lower incomes. So it is important for social, economic and environmental reasons that we get this right and our vision is quite clearly is to get more people on buses, that is what we want to do. But we also want to get a fairer deal for the tax payer and a fairer deal for the fare payer and I am frankly not convinced that it is happening at the present time. £2.5 billion of public money is spent on buses each year so it is only like every other area of public spending which is questioned whether the bus market is delivering the best service for passengers and the best value for the tax payer. That&#39;s fine, I welcome the current Competition Commission Inquiry into the local bus market. The Commission is best placed to deal with the difficult questions about the level of competition between bus operators and whether the current regulatory framework for buses is the right one. My Department has submitted evidence to the Competition Commission, and is engaging fully in the process as it continues before the conclusions are announced later on this year in draft form and next year in final form. They are an independent body and they will reach their own conclusions, but I think it is important that we put the perspective of the Department and that is what we have done.</p> <p>I am also keen to see the faster roll-out of smart ticketing across England, because that offers huge potential benefits for passengers, local authorities and operators. The Government has made £10 million of funding available to 9 big cities outside London and subsequently to the outcome of the Spending Review. I am very keen to incentivise operators and local authorities to do more. I am very struck by an example from Eurostar who, simply by offering a through ticket from stations like York and Peterborough to Brussels and Paris, doing nothing else, have actually increased the market for people using the train between those two destinations simply because they have only got one ticket - they have changed their behaviour. We underestimate potentially the value of getting ticketing right in terms of securing modal shift.</p> <p>I also recently announced another £15 million of government funding for a fleet of low carbon buses which we estimate will save 50,000 tonnes of CO2 over a 15 year period. More importantly, I hope it will drive the market for such buses so they become the norm across our country.</p> <p>As far as trams are concerned I am very keen to follow the lead of cities like Manchester and Nottingham showing the value of light rail and how it can contribute. Too many tram schemes have been started and failed and the last 10 years have not been a happy time for light rail. That&#39;s why I have initiated in the Department a full review of the costs of light rail to understand why those schemes have failed, to look at comparisons elsewhere in Europe, to examine the cost base, for example in terms of utilities, and to try to get light rail in a position where it can compete sensibly for funding when the Spending Review is over.</p> <p>On roads, obviously improved public transport is essential if we are to tackle the scourge of congestion. But there are other ways we can help the traffic flow in our towns and cities. We want authorities to be free to make their own decisions on how best to manage their street works and in particular to consider permit schemes like those that have been launched in Kent and London and which are clearly already delivering impressive results. Complaints about road works in Kent have fallen by half since the scheme&#39;s introduction in January. We will also be looking at a pilot Lane Rental scheme.</p> <p>The traffic signs policy review is also a priority for the Department and is progressing well. We expect that to be completed by early next year. You will also be aware, although it is a Home Office matter, that we are looking seriously at the problem of clamping on private land which is something everybody seems to feel strongly about and a large number of people appear to have suffered from up and down the country - one and two of our Ministerial colleagues feel very strongly about the matter.</p> <p>We are also committed to working a more closely with councils, road safety groups, police, transport operators and others to reduce accidents on local roads.</p> <p>Now one last area I wanted to refer to is the issue of alternatives to travel. This is a new part of the transport Department so I am the first Minister to encourage people not to travel. So it is counter intuitive perhaps, but nevertheless it has its value. Why? Because although there is a role for making sure our transport systems are green, and we have to do that, there is also a role in economic and environmental terms from looking at whether we have to go from A to B at all. If we are going to encourage home working even if 1 in 10 days are spent at home, think of the difference they would make in terms of congestion on the roads for those who are left on the roads. If we can get people video conferencing for when they are talking to businesses in America, or wherever it happens, think of the carbon that can be saved and the time that can be saved for business by not having to fly from Heathrow across the pond. So there are economical and environmental benefits to be pursued from this and that is why I was very pleased when I read the issue in the Daily Telegraph the other day. It was Matthew Farrow from the CBI who said &quot;We agree there needs to be big changes to the way we work and commute...employers are increasingly enabling staff to stagger their commutes and break out of the usual &#39;nine to five&#39;.&quot; It was also welcome by the Campaign for Better Transport who described it as a &quot;huge step forward&quot;. So there we are it&#39;s a policy that pleases many it seems so obviously that is something that Government wants to take forward. It is a bold policy, there&#39;s no doubt about that, but if I can say here in the Oval it is better to be &#39;bowled&#39; than to be &#39;stumped&#39; when it comes to policy!</p> <p>So Mr Chairman let me just say I hope today I have given you an insight in to how the Government&#39;s local transport strategy will help us cut spending, promote localism, improve connectivity, encourage economic recovery and protect the environment. Now the big story in the next couple of years will be coming to terms with the financial problem the country has. But that needn&#39;t be a cloud which stops us moving forward and doing the right thing in transport. There will be thousands of smaller stories - councils, communities doing things in new ways, and by pushing the localism agenda we are going to free-up innovation for councils, just to try things out and lead by example so that people can pick up these good ideas and say &#39;they are doing this down the road why don&#39;t we try it&#39;. We want to change the way people travel, to connect the different travel modes more effectively, to reward greener travel initiatives, to link transport policy to local health issues. Cycling, for example, has got a very good cost/ratio in terms of transport, but is also very good in terms of tackling obesity so has a knock on effect that is very useful for society. These are areas that can make real progress in our local agenda. I very much look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:50.395894 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20100720 Norman Baker MP Local Transport Today Conference Department for Transport 20 July 2010 2010-07-20T00:00:00 The Oval, London
<object height="340" width="560"> <param value="http://www.youtube.com/v/pwYT9udg9tE&amp;hl=en_GB&amp;fs=1" name="movie"> </param><param value="true" name="allowFullScreen"> </param><param value="always" name="allowscriptaccess"> <embed height="340" width="560" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/pwYT9udg9tE&amp;hl=en_GB&amp;fs=1"> </embed></param></object> <p>Hello.</p> <p>I&#39;m really sorry I canâ&euro;&trade;t be with you in person today. None-the less, this is an important event dealing with important issues and I really did want to find a way to take part in it.</p> <p>So thank-you for giving me an opportunity to say a few words through the wonders of modern communications technology and, indeed, for helping me to promote another part of my brief - namely alternatives to travel.<br /> <br />My Department is focused on building a modern and sustainable transport system - one that connects our communities, supports our economy and protects our environment. But, as youâ&euro;&trade;ll understand, that is a real challenge when set against the backdrop of the countryâ&euro;&trade;s enormous inherited debt crisis.</p> <p>On the spending plans we inherited, British taxpayers would be paying out £70 billion in debt interest a year by the end of this Parliament - thatâ&euro;&trade;s more than we spend on educating our children, defending our country or policing our streets. To use a motoring metaphor, the public finances inherited by the Coalition Government resembled a car that had been running dangerously low on engine oil. We have had to stop the car, top it up, give it a service and get it back on the road in a fit state to take us forward.</p> <p>So the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s top priority is to tackle that legacy of debt. And a watershed moment in our efforts to put the public finances back on track will be the autumn Spending Review. But the challenge of the Spending Review is also an opportunity - an opportunity to reassess and re-evaluate priorities in transport spending.</p> <p>Local highways will, of course, be no exception to this process. But make no mistake - our local highways matter. They are not simply a vital part of the wider transport network, they are the most valuable transport assets that a local authority will own. Unfortunately, they can also be an easy target for cuts. Well, given that local roads help to support the social and economic goals, both of central Government and local authorities, unthinking cuts all too often are a false economy.</p> <p>Let me give you some good news. This Government is committed to localism, to letting councils get on with they job for which they were elected. Under this Government, local authorities like yours will have greater freedom to spend money where it is needed. In other words, you will be able to focus and target capital investment on those areas that offer the very best returns. And the indications are that investment in highways maintenance not only offers real value for money for taxpayers, it also produces benefits for the travelling public in lower vehicle operating costs and faster travel times.</p> <p>I&#39;m sure that everyone in the audience will know that, in March this year, the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy published a new code of practice on transport infrastructure assets. This will begin to affect local authorities in a very real way from 2012/13, when the current replacement cost of their highways assets begins to appear in their accounts. And, while, at first glance, the change may seem to be a challenging one, it also offers genuine benefits to local authorities because the evidence base for the budget decisions you take, and the consequences of those decisions, will be much clearer to you, your Council Tax payers and the wider public. All in all, better decision making.</p> <p>The new code will mean that if local authorities fail to invest in their highways networks the impact on asset values will be plain for all to see. There is a mandatory dry run in 2011/12 So, while I have the chance, I want to tell you that itâ&euro;&trade;s not too late to register for the launch event that CIPFA are running on 19th July in London at the Treasury.</p> <p>Asset management is an important tool for delivering efficiencies. Indeed, CIPFA themselves estimate that somewhere in the order of 5% a year worth of savings can be achieved. So, in an age where all of us must learn to do more with less, making the best use of existing assets is often a better choice than spending on new build. Put simply, keeping up investment in highways maintenance, even in testing times, makes economic sense, not just transport sense. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s the reason that I, and the Secretary of State, were united in ruling out any cuts in the money for repairing pot holes â&euro;&ldquo; a stitch in time and all that.</p> <p>Local roads are so much more than highways that take you from A to B. They are also where people live, work and shop. So when we plan, when we devise policy and when we debate and discuss the key issues we should consider each and every stakeholder - from car drivers to pedestrians, and from local residents to local businesses.</p> <p>We should also think about the contribution local highways make towards sustainable travel. After all, making a journey by bike or on foot - two forms of travel that are good for our health as well as good for the environment - would be a lot more difficult without properly maintained roads and pavements. And the same is equally true when people come to use public transport like buses, or join car clubs. Both modes of travel help to cut carbon emissions but both depend on decent roads.</p> <p>Our approach to local roads is rooted in this Government&#39;s commitment to localism. For us, the new politics we have promised is one where the best form of government is the government that lets people govern themselves.</p> <p>That&#39;s why, in the Coalition Agreement, we have pledged to a review of local government finance - something that will give greater financial autonomy to local government.</p> <p>It&#39;s also why, in the Queen&#39;s Speech, we announced the Devolution and Localism Bill. This important Bill will shift power from the central state back into the hands of individuals, communities and councils. It will empower local people giving them more power over local government. And it will free local government from central and regional control so that they can ensure services are delivered according to local needs.</p> <p>It doesnâ&euro;&trade;t make sense for local councils to have to fill in endless forms, to bid for this or that pot of money, or to seek clearance from central government for actions that you are well capable of deciding for yourselves. We are going to deal with that.</p> <p>Okay - I know you have a packed schedule. So it just remains to me to thank you for listening and to wish you an enjoyable and productive day. I look forward to working with you all in the months and years to come.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:13:56.159326 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20100715 Norman Baker MP Asphalt Industry Alliance Department for Transport 15 July 2010 2010-07-15T00:00:00 Asphalt Industry Alliance Regional Forum
<h2>Introduction</h2> <p>Thank you for inviting me to speak at this important event.</p> <p>It may be helpful if I indicate that this Government has two clear priorities. Sorting out Britainâ&euro;&trade;s financial problems, and developing a greener, low carbon economy.  These priorities are complementary, not contradictory. </p> <p>Transport has a crucial role to play in achieving these goals. Indeed, Transport Secretary Philip Hammond has said that his twin aims are to ensure that the transport sector contributes to economic growth and to the achievement of our carbon reduction targets.</p> <p>In respect of the economic challenge we face, we are taking urgent and immediate action to deal with the debt crisis. It is vital we have a strong and stable economy to support the transition to a greener low carbon economy in future. </p> <p>We have already announced some spending cuts - with the DfT contributing £683m this year - and now the focus is on autumnâ&euro;&trade;s Spending Review.</p> <p>Of course this is going to require some tough and difficult decisions. We have to cut waste, prioritise the most important schemes, and deliver better value for every pound of public expenditure.</p> <p>We will also reform the way that transport projects are appraised in England - so that schemes offering the best carbon efficiency and value for money are fully recognised. The revised system will be launched after the Spending Review.</p> <p>Only after the Spending Review can we identify which major transport programmes we will be able to support, and provide precise details about funding for the immediate future.</p> <p>But let me be clear. Cutting our spending doesnâ&euro;&trade;t have to be incompatible with a low carbon agenda. Some low carbon choices already offer outstanding value for money - and our future goal is a market for green vehicles that makes economic as well as environmental sense. </p> <p>Green jobs and green investment are essential for our economic recovery.  This makes hard economic sense.</p> <p>Let me now give you a quick overview of some of the ways in which the new Government is approaching the low carbon transport agenda.</p> <h2>Vehicles</h2> <p>The car is key.  While rail is important, the vast majority of journeys are, and will continue to be, made by car; progress must be made on road vehicles in order to reduce carbon.  The enemy is not the car, but the carbon. </p> <p>So, a key part of any strategy to reduce transportâ&euro;&trade;s emissions is making sure that the cars we drive are as clean and fuel-efficient as possible.</p> <p>In the longer term, electric vehicles are increasingly likely to provide a clean, low carbon alternative, with air quality as well as climate change benefits.</p> <p>But in the short term, the majority of CO2 savings from road transport will come from improvements to conventional technologies, driven mostly by EU regulations on fuel efficiency.   We canâ&euro;&trade;t just sit back and wait for electric vehicles to ride to the rescue tomorrow: we have to make sure weâ&euro;&trade;re squeezing more fuel efficiency out of petrol and diesel cars today.</p> <p>And we mustnâ&euro;&trade;t forget vans either. They are vital to our low carbon vehicle programme, and we are considering this aspect. We will shortly be publishing a reply to the very informative responses received during the recent consultation on the draft van CO2 regulation.</p> <h2>Electric vehicles</h2> <p>But what about the longer-term future?</p> <p>No-one knows, of course, which technology will dominate - but there are already electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EVs and PHEVs) which are close to market.</p> <p>I am well aware of the views of many influential stakeholders on the need for Government support to kick-start the plug-in car market.  We have listened very carefully to what the car manufactures, the Climate Change Committee, environmental groups and others have said on this, and I know that this is something that you will be discussing later today at your conference.</p> <p>In the coalition agreement we said we will mandate a national recharging network as well as a smart grid and smart metering.  We are carefully considering the options for delivering value for money, and an infrastructure thatâ&euro;&trade;s fit for purpose.</p> <p>A recharging infrastructure is one thing.  Getting people to buy the cars is another.</p> <p>I know that many of you are impatient to hear how we might support purchases of low-carbon vehicles, including electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. </p> <p>This is something which we are currently considering very carefully as we review our Departmental commitments..  We understand the need to give some clarity and certainty here, and we will be making an announcement as soon as possible.</p> <h2>Buses</h2> <p>The low carbon transport agenda is not just about low carbon cars. I know that LowCVP has made a very useful contribution over the years to help develop a market for low carbon buses.</p> <p>Over the past year, my Department has welcomed the LowCVPâ&euro;&trade;s support in helping to design and promote a framework of incentives for low carbon buses including the roll out of the Green Bus Fund.</p> <p>And as the Minister for buses, this is an area I&#39;m keen to support. Last week I announced £15m funding for green buses which will see over 150 new low carbon vehicles joining fleets throughout England.   </p> <p>In addition to the £30m for round one which we are currently paying out, this funding is intended to put low carbon buses within the reach of as many operators and local authorities as possible throughout England.</p> <p>Bus operators and councils can bid for the money which they can then use towards the additional up-front cost of buying low carbon buses.</p> <p>We want to support new transport technologies to help make our transport system greener and more sustainable. This investment will stimulate the market for low carbon buses by reducing some of the initial costs for operators and councils.</p> <p>It will deliver significant benefits, in particular reducing the impact of road transport on climate change and improving air quality.</p> <p>Low carbon buses use at least 30 per cent less fuel and emit nearly a third less carbon than a conventional bus, yet they currently make up a tiny fraction of buses on the road. </p> <p>This may partly be due to uncertainty about the operational performance of low carbon buses. This funding will help to address this information gap by requiring the winning bidders to share information with others in the industry.</p> <h2>Biofuels</h2> <p>Biofuels has been a very complex and controversial area in recent years. There is no doubt that they have an important part to play in the overall mix of measures to decarbonise transport. There has equally and rightly been much concern about the wider sustainability of biofuels: this is a debate I followed closely when I was in opposition. </p> <p>It is abundantly clear to me that, while there are many good biofuels, such as used cooking oil, there are also many biofuels which deliver no environmental benefits whatsoever, particularly when indirect impacts are taken into account.</p> <p>Given this, I believe that it is right that the Government should take some additional time to review this subject carefully, to ensure that policy decisions going forward are robust and stable, especially in respect of the uncertainties of the Fuel Quality Directive and the Renewable Energy Directive, and how they will work together. </p> <p>I have discussed these issues with stakeholders who have impressed on me their strong views - both about the benefits and also about other wider implications of biofuels use, such as concerns over indirect land use change. Iâ&euro;&trade;m sure you will agree that a policy of stop-start, on-off support for biofuels is in no-oneâ&euro;&trade;s interests: we all need a clear long-term direction - and thatâ&euro;&trade;s what we aim to provide.</p> <h2>Travel choices</h2> <p>Technology and cleaner fuels are important in reducing emissions, but they are not enough on their own. We also need to think about the choices we make, as individuals and businesses, about when, where and how we travel, and how we carry goods around the country.</p> <p>As you know well, significant savings can be achieved simply through the type of vehicles we purchase or the way we use them. And I know LowCVP has provided a useful input into this area of work - particularly through the launch of the fuel economy labels for both new and used cars - something I welcome. </p> <p>This can be a challenging area, and transport behaviours can be difficult to influence. I had a useful discussion with the Energy Saving Trust last week about some of these challenges. I was encouraged to hear that they are seeing some promising results from their work with individuals and business fleets. And of course, many of the actions in this area do make sense on both economic and environmental grounds.</p> <h2>Alternatives to travel</h2> <p>Of course the Government has an important role to play here.  Indeed, I am the first Transport Minister to say â&euro;&tilde;donâ&euro;&trade;t travelâ&euro;&trade;!</p> <p>We currently think of transport in terms of four different modes - road, rail, air, and water.  I want us all to start recognising that &#39;communication&#39; can be the 5th mode....and that communications technology can provide an alternative to travel in the first place.</p> <p>So Iâ&euro;&trade;m looking into ideas and measures that enable people to do business without having to leave their homes or offices, for instance through the use of broadband-enabled technologies.</p> <p>I was pleased to read in the Daily Telegraph on Saturday that my new remit - developing alternatives to travel - was welcomed by the CBI and the Campaign for Better Transport.</p> <p>There is a common theme here - cutting carbon, creating jobs.</p> <h2>Supporting business, deregulation</h2> <p>Again, the challenge for government and the low carbon industry is to deliver carbon savings in a way which also creates jobs and economic benefits.</p> <p>We are committed to supporting the development of a world class low carbon vehicle industry in Britain. The shift to lower carbon vehicles will create a new production and business model, and provide the opportunity for a reinvigorated UK automotive sector, supporting a rebalancing of the economy towards high tech jobs.</p> <p>I am very impressed with progress made by the motor industry in this country towards greener vehicles - from major manufacturers, to scores of specialist high-tech suppliers and engineering companies. The move to ultra-low carbon vehicles is creating diverse business opportunities in the automotive supply chain and associated energy storage and infrastructure sectors.</p> <p>Renault/Nissanâ&euro;&trade;s decision to manufacture the Leaf electric car in Sunderland, as well as to locate its European battery plant at the Sunderland plant is very welcome.  One of the first decisions of the new Government was to re-confirm £20m towards this valuable project.  We also welcome Toyotaâ&euro;&trade;s investment to build the new hybrid Auris in Burnaston.  Both are strong endorsements of the UK as a manufacturing base for the next generation of cars.</p> <p>And smaller, highly innovative companies - like Allied in Scotland, Modec in Coventry, Smiths in Tyne and Wear, and Ashwoods in Exeter - are showing what is possible in respect of electric and hybrid vans.</p> <h2>Deregulation</h2> <p>Part of our commitment to creating a business-friendly environment in the UK involves cutting costs - and reducing the regulatory burden.</p> <p>The Coalition agreement makes it clear that we want to turn old thinking on its head and develop new approaches to government. We want to avoid the bureaucratic levers of the past and find intelligent ways to encourage, support and enable people to make better choices for themselves.</p> <p>And we are starting to do that.</p> <p>On the 1st of July, Vince Cable chaired the first Reducing Regulation Cabinet Committee. This committee, along with a new &quot;challenge group&quot;, will help change the culture of Government and find new ways of solving problems, reducing the red tape that can strangle enterprise.</p> <p>This will help ensure that any new regulations are robustly justified, and that all other options have been considered before regulations are introduced.</p> <p>We are also introducing a &quot;One-In - One-Out&quot; regulatory management system, so that any new regulatory costs will be compensated by even greater cuts to the cost of old laws.</p> <p>We need businesses to drive the growth our economy needs, not be tied up with form filling, and the Government is determined to do all it can to make that happen.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>Thank you for inviting me to speak at this important and timely event.</p> <p>And let me take this opportunity to thank the motor industry - and the low carbon vehicle industry - for everything you have accomplished in recent years to get us to where we are today.</p> <p>I sincerely believe that you are the modern day equivalent of some of the early motor industry pioneers who were responsible for revolutionising personal mobility in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.</p> <p>What you are doing is of historic significance - and we are determined to support you so that the transport sector can play a central role in reducing carbon emissions. </p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s very early days - itâ&euro;&trade;s less than nine weeks since I took up my post - but I look forward to working with you to meet our shared goals.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:14:01.830322 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/baker20100714 Norman Baker MP Speech to LowCVP conference Department for Transport 14 July 2010 2010-07-14T00:00:00 Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership (CVP) Conference, Twickenham Stadium
<h2>Introductory remarks</h2> <p>Ladies and gentlemen,</p> <p>Thank you for inviting me here today - itâ&euro;&trade;s a pleasure to take part in one of the keynote events in the rail calendar.</p> <p>While I was preparing this speech I did a little digging.</p> <p>And I discovered that I am actually the nineteenth Transport Secretary over the last thirty years.</p> <p>Each one of my predecessors brought his, or her, own style, character traits and approach to the job.</p> <p>And each, like me, will have had to come to terms with the immense complexity of the railway industry â&euro;&ldquo; it is by far the most challenging area of the transport brief, with a language, history and culture of all of its own. And, as I am rapidly discovering, plenty of characters of its own as well.</p> <p>Some of my predecessors were pretty openly rail sceptics.</p> <p>Others, some of them not long gone, were frankly rail romantics.</p> <p>I am not in either of those camps. But I place myself firmly in the category of people who believe in our railways and the spectacular renaissance they have undergone.</p> <p>I remember when I was a teenager growing up in the sixties and seventies, I can distinctly remember two pieces of conventional wisdom â&euro;&ldquo; you know the sort that starts with â&euro;&oelig;everyone knows thatâ&euro;¦â&euro;?</p> <p>The first was that the cinema was in terminal decline due to the advent of colour TV. And the second was that the motor car and the motorways had sounded the death knell of our railways.</p> <p>As so often happens, neither conventional wisdom was true. Indeed, cinema and the railways are both thriving and in notably better health than they were forty years ago.</p> <p>We recognise that our railways can contribute fundamentally to two of our key objectives, economic growth and carbon reduction.</p> <p>But they must also contribute to our first and overriding objective â&euro;&ldquo; fiscal retrenchment.</p> <p>So, when I look at the railways, itâ&euro;&trade;s not through rose-tinted spectacles, but I hope with a fresh pair of eyes â&euro;&ldquo; aware of the opportunities but alert to the challenges. Not as a railway romantic, but as a railway realist.</p> <p>That means I want to engage with you and work with you â&euro;&ldquo; with an open mind and an open door.</p> <p>But it also means I will not shy away from telling you the hard truths when they need to be told.</p> <p>And the first hard truth is that Britainâ&euro;&trade;s railway industry must now learn to operate in a radically altered public spending environment.</p> <h2>The fiscal and economic challenge</h2> <p>The scale of the fiscal and economic challenge this government faced on coming to office was unprecedented.</p> <p>Britain has just struggled out of the longest and deepest recession in its peacetime history.</p> <p>We are saddled with the largest budget deficit of any economy in Europe - with the single exception of Ireland.</p> <p>Borrowing one pound in every four we are spending, adding £3 billion each week to our national debt.</p> <p>And according to pre-Budget forecasts carried out by our new and independent Office of Budget Responsibility, the permanent hole in the nationâ&euro;&trade;s finances and the structural deficit was even larger than had been previously thought.</p> <p>Based on the spending plans that this Government inherited by the end of this Parliament British taxpayers would have been paying out £70bn a year just in interest on our national debt.</p> <p>That is more than we spend on educating our children, policing our streets or defending our country - putting businesses, jobs, interest rates and the recovery at risk.</p> <p>So dealing with the largest budget deficit in our peacetime history, and putting our public finances back on a sustainable path, is the single most pressing issue facing this Government and this country.</p> <p>Immediately on coming into office we identified, and removed, £6 billion worth of public spending from this year, including £100 million from Network Railâ&euro;&trade;s 2010-11 budget.</p> <p>Last monthâ&euro;&trade;s Emergency Budget set out the decisive measures that will set this country on the road to fiscal discipline and economic recovery with a four year plan to eliminate our structural deficit and get debt falling as a percentage of GDP.</p> <p>The next major milestone on our journey to fiscal recovery will be the announcement of the Spending Review for the next four years.</p> <p>We already know the overall envelope of spending we face â&euro;&ldquo; 25% cuts in the resource budgets for non ring-fenced departments on average and the implementation of the previous governmentâ&euro;&trade;s planned 40% reduction in capital spending from a 2010-11 baseline.</p> <h2>Well judged capital spending</h2> <p>I am not going to pretend that this will be easy, or that it will not hurt. Of course it will.</p> <p>But, for transport, and for the rail industry, there is some good news â&euro;&ldquo; and I think itâ&euro;&trade;s in two parts.</p> <p>First â&euro;&ldquo; this new Government has rejected further capital spending cuts as the easy option in tackling the deficit.</p> <p>As the Chancellor said in his Emergency Budget speech â&euro;&ldquo; </p> <p>â&euro;&oelig;<em>Well-judged capital spending by government can help provide the new infrastructure our economy needs to compete in the modern world</em>â&euro;?.</p> <p>It is my firm belief that, if we get transport infrastructure projects right, they are one of the best investments the taxpayer can make â&euro;&ldquo; delivering economic benefits many times their cost.</p> <p>The second piece of good news is that the measures that we have set out will get the UKâ&euro;&trade;s public finances back into balance by 2015.</p> <p>And, in terms of investment in railway infrastructure, that timescale is virtually the blink of an eye.</p> <p>In the meantime, tough decisions will have to be taken.</p> <p>The capital that we do have available must be focussed relentlessly on those projects that deliver the growth and the jobs that Britain now so desperately needs.</p> <p>The Chancellor has made clear that the Government understands the case for well judged capital spending; that it will take tough decisions to reduce Government revenue expenditure, rather than going for the easy option of slashing investment.</p> <p>But a responsible government can only invest in an efficient and cost effective railway. The challenge we collectively face is to show that we are on track to deliver that cost effective railway.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s our shared reality. And, while weâ&euro;&trade;re on the subject of reality, let me say a word about rail fares.</p> <p>Thereâ&euro;&trade;s been all sorts of speculation doing the rounds and I would like to put the record straight.</p> <p>My position is simple â&euro;&ldquo; we have to reduce the cost of our railways to the public purse, and I firmly believe we must look to efficiency savings first. Anything less would be an abdication of our duty to the taxpayer and the passenger.</p> <p>But it would also be a dereliction of our duty to future generations of rail users to take a dogmatic approach to the contribution current users make to the maintenance and modernisation of the railways.</p> <p>To my mind, the current fares formula is a reasonable and sensible approach. But it cannot be set in stone when all the other variables are vulnerable to change and to challenges.</p> <p>We will face some very stark choices and it would be irresponsible at this point to rule out even considering an increased contribution from the fare payer as part of the solution to protecting investment in the railways.</p> <p>It is a stark fact that to secure a sustainable commitment to our railways, we need to secure the sustainability of our railways.</p> <p>And to secure that sustainability, we must re-invent the way we work together in order to deliver more with less</p> <h2>McNulty Review</h2> <p>As you will be aware, Sir Roy McNulty is carrying out for us a Review of Value for Money on the railways.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already received, and welcomed, a scoping study report from Sir Roy.</p> <p>And that report confirms that the cost of the UKâ&euro;&trade;s railways is relatively high - both in historic terms and by comparison with other European railways.</p> <p>I recognise that this report represents a very early stage in the work of Sir Roy and his team.</p> <p>They will now develop his work, identifying the factors that drive up the cost of the UKâ&euro;&trade;s railways â&euro;&ldquo; and we really do need to understand those factors, whether they are structural or cultural, systemic or specific.</p> <p>The next stage of the Review will involve a close look at options for ensuring public investment in the railways is delivered as efficiently and effectively as possible â&euro;&ldquo; and I have asked Sir Roy to accelerate key elements of his work so that his preliminary findings can inform the discussions that are made as part of the autumn Spending Review.</p> <p>I am convinced that this landmark review can point the way towards the future sustainability of our railways.</p> <p>I intend to use Sir Royâ&euro;&trade;s report as the focus for my teamâ&euro;&trade;s thinking about the future of the railway.</p> <p>And, while we will wait to see what his report says, we do not start from an entirely blank sheet of paper. We do have some views in advance of its publication â&euro;&ldquo; although we will be open minded if Sir Roy makes the case for a different approach.</p> <p>While I have this opportunity, I would urge industry stakeholders to engage with Sir Roy and his team to offer their fullest co-operation.</p> <h2>Industry structure</h2> <p>One of the benefits of being a new boy is that you approach a business with unblinkered vision and a fresh perspective.</p> <p>The first thing that has struck me about this industry, and it is very early days, is that the elaborate and expensive structures in place to create a simulated market do not necessarily produce the behaviour that the theory suggests.</p> <p>It is clear to me that the structure of the railway industry should be designed to achieve the ambitions we have for our railways.</p> <p>That means train companies which are responsive to passengers and an infrastructure operator thatâ&euro;&trade;s responsive to train companies and able to deliver the best results for passengers, companies and the taxpayer.</p> <p>So we will examine the current structures and incentives to see where improvements can be made.</p> <p>An accountable structure is also a transparent structure.</p> <p>The previous governmentâ&euro;&trade;s scope for manoeuvre was significantly restrained by the over-riding imperative it imposed on itself to keep Network Railâ&euro;&trade;s debt off the balance sheet.</p> <p>I will face no such artificial constraints. It is a matter of complete indifference to me â&euro;&ldquo; and indeed to the Treasury â&euro;&ldquo; how the national statisticians classify Network Railâ&euro;&trade;s debt. Our decisions will be taken on the basis of what is right for the railway, not on the basis of accounting treatment.</p> <p>We will work with the ORR to explore how best to make all the players in the rail market more responsive to their immediate customers, passengers and train operators as well as to the needs of taxpayers.</p> <p>And being responsive also means being responsive to the economic realities of the day - from the services offered to customers, to the pay and conditions offered to employees, to the bonuses paid to directors.</p> <p>In the private sector, many employees have had to forgo wage increases over the recession. Now, in the public sector, we are asking workers to accept a two year pay freeze as part of our collective efforts to tackle the debt crisis.</p> <p>To be frank, I think a lot of people will be asking why this same pay discipline canâ&euro;&trade;t also be applied to the railways â&euro;&ldquo; an industry that, in effect, straddles the private and the public sectors because of its dependence on billions of pounds worth of taxpayersâ&euro;&trade; money.</p> <p>And, if we are going to ask people to endure personal sacrifices to get ourselves out of the hole we are in, then those at the top have a duty to act fairly and set the right example, especially on pay and bonuses.</p> <h2>Franchising</h2> <p>Let me turn for a moment to rail franchising. And again, as a Government, we approach this area of policy conscious of the need to re-invent the way we work.</p> <p>My Department has just announced a pause in the competition for franchises and a consultation exercise on the future of rail franchising policy, led by my Minister of State, Theresa Villiers.</p> <p>Our starting point is that franchises need to be longer. Franchisees need to invest more, take more risk and have more ability to respond to changes in circumstances as they occur. In other words they need to behave more like market operatrors.</p> <p>Believe me, this is a consultation that really matters.</p> <p>It matters because it will give industry partners a chance to help shape our approach to rail franchising and investment in improvements to trains and services.</p> <p>But it also matters because I hope it signals a change in the way we want to do things. It is not all about my department specifying its requirements in a vacuum.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s about harnessing your energy and capacity for innovation to proactively propose changes that will deliver balanced benefits â&euro;&ldquo; for passengers and taxpayers.</p> <h2>High Speed Rail</h2> <p>Before I conclude I want to reiterate this Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s commitment to high speed rail.</p> <p>It lies at the heart of our transport policy. It drives difficult decisions which we have taken on additional runways at Londonâ&euro;&trade;s airports.</p> <p>This Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s vision for high speed rail is of a network that is truly UK wide, with seamless links to Heathrow, and connections to Europe.</p> <p>Such a network will have the potential to increase capacity, improve connections and encourage a modal shift from long road journeys and short haul flights â&euro;&ldquo;stimulating economic growth and contributing to our climate change targets.</p> <p>Whatâ&euro;&trade;s more, because we plan a process of phased construction, I am confident that high speed rail can be delivered in an affordable way and that we can build a domestic supply chain to support the project over the thirty plus years of its life.</p> <p>High speed rail has the power to transform the economic and social geography of our country in the 21st century â&euro;&ldquo; just as the coming of the original railway did in the 19th century.</p> <p>It will transform the prospects of our regional cities and the powerhouse of the London economy.</p> <p>It will help to close regional pay and wealth differentials as we literally shrink our country into a single travel to work area.</p> <p>At the same time as we press ahead at full speed with HS2, so we are proceeding with the sale of a 30 year concession on HS1.</p> <p>We need to make our national assets work harder for the country and we need to harness private enterprise to improve public services and deliver better value for money for the taxpayer.</p> <p>The money generated from the HS1 sale will give a much needed boost to the public finances as we tackle the debt crisis head on. The risks facing HS1 now that construction is complete and operational reliability has been proved are commercial risks â&euro;&ldquo; of a type best managed by commercial companies.</p> <p>The sale will benefit both domestic and international passengers as the successful private bidder responds to the incentives he will face to attract new operators, serve new routes and grow the business.</p> <h2>Concluding remarks</h2> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ve spoken today about the bigger picture, the economic and fiscal backdrop against which the future of our railways must be planned. I have signalled, I hope, a distinct change of focus from the approach of my predecessor.</p> <p>I have taken the risk of sharing with you some of my initial early perceptions of the industry and its structure.</p> <p>I have been frank with you about the affordability of some of what has been promised in the past.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;ve set out my view as to what all of this means for the industry and the challenges we face in building a sustainable future for our railways.</p> <p>I have argued that the bestâ&euro;&ldquo; in fact the only â&euro;&ldquo; way to respond to these challenges is to re-invent the way that we work.</p> <p>There will be some big decisions to be taken in the autumn once our budgets are fixed â&euro;&ldquo; on IEP, HLOS rolling stock, electrification and the major London rail projects. Some tough choices will be required â&euro;&ldquo; I promise you I will not shrink from taking them.</p> <p>But with the challenges, comes great opportunities. The history of the railway is characterised by innovation and invention, persistence and perseverance, achievement and advancement.</p> <p>Those who work in, on and for this crucial 21st century industry are rightly proud of its long history. Today Iâ&euro;&trade;m here to tell you that you can be confident about its future.</p> <p>Yes, this a time of challenge and change for our railways â&euro;&ldquo; no doubt about that.</p> <p>And we will be relying on the skill, the innovation, the commitment and the dedication of the people and the organisations represented here today to step up to the plate and work with us to deliver a sustainable railway for the 21st century, meeting the needs of its passengers, as well as those of the taxpayer and the wider economy.</p> <p>I have every confidence in your ability to deliver and I have every confidence in the future of this great industry.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:14:08.366522 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20100709 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP National Rail Conference Department for Transport 08 July 2010 2010-07-08T00:00:00 BT Convention Centre, Monarchs Quay, Liverpool
<p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s a pleasure to be here to give my first major speech as Rail Minister to your Annual Conference.</p> <p>When I took on the transport brief in Opposition there was a truth I came to learn very quickly - rail freight matters.</p> <p>It matters for our economy and our prosperity.</p> <p>It matters for producers and consumers, importers and exporters.</p> <p>And it matters for our environment.</p> <p>And I pay tribute to the work of the Rail Freight Group and its chairman putting the case for your industry with clarity, skill and determination.</p> <p>Ladies and gentlemen, there are many good reasons why we want rail freight to grow in the years ahead.</p> <p>The facts will be familiar to this audience but it bears repeating that rail freight produces five times less CO2 per tonne-kilometre than road haulage.</p> <p>Add to that the benefits to be gained by taking lorries off our congested road network with the traffic flow and road safety benefits that brings and you have a good case for promoting the transfer of freight from roads to rail.</p> <p>So rail freight is an important part of our vision for the future of transport.</p> <p>One of the many reasons why the Coalition supports high speed rail is the benefits it will bring by releasing more paths for freight on our existing railways for example on the WCML to the Midlands and beyond.</p> <p>And although the proposed new high speed lines are viewed principally as passenger focused we expect the lines to be designed to make them freight capable as well. </p> <p>But the broader question that needs to be addressed is how best can the new Government provide the right conditions for rail freight to grow and flourish and capture market share from the roads?</p> <p>The first and arguably the most important strand of Government policy which is relevant here is one that goes well beyond the transport sector.</p> <p>I am speaking of course, of the very difficult work we are undertaking to tackle the deficit, put the economy on a sound footing and relieve the burden of red tape and regulation on the business community as a whole.</p> <p>There will be pain in the months and years to come as we seek to grapple with the devastating crisis in the public finances we inherited from our predecessors.</p> <p>But painful as it will be, itâ&euro;&trade;s the only way to secure the economic stability needed for your industry and your customers to invest and flourish in the way needed to create jobs and revive prosperity.</p> <p>In the run-up to Octoberâ&euro;&trade;s Spending Review, we are looking at every area of departmental expenditure for affordability and value for money including rail.</p> <p>I am well aware of how strongly the industry supports the retention of the mode-shift revenue grant and the Freight Facilities Grant programme.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m afraid, for the moment, I canâ&euro;&trade;t give any promises on the future of these grants.</p> <p>It would be unwise of me to do so while work continues on the difficult task of preparing for the Comprehensive Spending Review.</p> <p>However, I can confirm that we have agreed the revenue grant budget for the 2010/2011and 2011/2012 financial years and the quarterly bid rounds will continue for grant applications until then.</p> <p>Secondly, we need to get the balance right between the interests of passengers and freight.</p> <p>I promised this in Opposition and Iâ&euro;&trade;m determined to live up to that promise in Government.</p> <p>But whether one is talking about passengers deciding between the train and the car or businesses deciding whether to move their goods by road or rail, we need a railway thatâ&euro;&trade;s more accountable and better incentivised to deliver high quality services for users.</p> <p>If weâ&euro;&trade;re to deliver that, we need an infrastructure provider that is responsive to customer concerns.</p> <p>So the third means of improving the climate for rail freight that Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to look at today is reform of Network Rail.</p> <p>In my view the status quo is simply not acceptable.</p> <p>For example, it is a matter of serious regret that Network Rail pressed ahead with paying massive bonuses to it staff despite the concerns expressed both by the Secretary of State and the regulator.</p> <p>While it may technically be a private company, the fact that its funding derives almost wholly from the taxpayer and its debt is backed by the Government, means payment of such high bonuses to its senior management at a time when the public sector has been asked to accept a pay freeze is to say the least unattractive.</p> <p>It is patently clear that the current mechanisms for delivering accountability and efficiency are inadequate.</p> <p>The Coalition Agreement carries forward the Conservative manifesto commitment to reform Network Rail so that it becomes more responsive and accountable to its direct customers the train and freight operators and to the passengers and business customers they serve.</p> <p>And we are determined to see costs come down.</p> <p>This issue will be at the heart of the McNulty Review of costs in the rail industry and I am grateful to those of you here who are submitting your views and suggestions to Sir Royâ&euro;&trade;s work.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;re carefully considering the best options for reform at Network Rail.</p> <p>And let me make it clear that the new Government will judge the issues on their merits.</p> <p>We will not be driven by tortuous attempts to keep Network Rail off the nationâ&euro;&trade;s balance sheet.</p> <p>While it is too early today to set out exactly what changes we will make at Network Rail, I can guarantee you that there will be change.</p> <p>The fourth policy area Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to touch on is perhaps even more difficult than the controversial questions around Network Rail, and that is the future for important freight upgrade projects around the network.</p> <p>The pressing need to deal with the deficit will clearly have an impact on how far and how fast we can go in delivering the enhancements that the freight industry wants to see.</p> <p>But I want to reassure you that I understand how important these projects are to your industry and to the economy as a whole, and to assure you that we will take forward this upgrade work where this can be reconcilable with our commitment to cut the deficit and the budgetary constraints this imposes.</p> <p>I welcome the work done by the previous Government on the Strategic Freight Network which had much to recommend it, not least the fact that the rail freight industry was positively engaged in the process of setting priorities for the programme.</p> <p>By way of example, I should single out the importance of the Peterborough to Nuneaton scheme.</p> <p>I believe that it provides a genuinely sustainable answer to the increase in maritime container flows from Felixstowe.</p> <p>I was pleased to see another major step towards the completion of the project was taken just a couple of weeks ago when the Transport and Works Order for the Nuneaton North Chord was signed.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;d also like to pay tribute to Network Rail for completing the vital gauge enhancement work to Southampton Tunnel with minimum disruption to passenger and freight services.</p> <p>And in taking forward reforms to the planning system we will bear in mind the impact on delivering important rail freight projects.</p> <p>Although we are committed to abolishing the Infrastructure Planning Commission, weâ&euro;&trade;ll replace it with an efficient and democratically accountable alternative.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;ll set up a new &quot;Major Infrastructure Unit&quot; as part of the existing Planning Inspectorate.</p> <p>That way, we retain the benefits of a fast-track process for major projects, including strategic rail freight interchanges of 60 hectares or more.</p> <p>Youâ&euro;&trade;ll appreciate that great care needs to be taken on this issue.</p> <p>I understand the importance of these interchanges to a successful rail freight sector and for modal switch.</p> <p>However, it is absolutely vital that the locations of these interchanges are selected with great care and that careful consideration is given to the impact on the local environment and the concerns of local communities.</p> <p>Moving on to my fifth theme, I believe itâ&euro;&trade;s important to make progress with the liberalisation of European rail freight markets.</p> <p>As a former MEP, I well recall the difficult task for seeking to prise open markets to European-wide competition.</p> <p>Although there is still a long way to go, I welcome progress towards a more commercial and liberalised Channel Tunnel regime.</p> <p>This year for example we have seen an increase in the number of through freight trains from Italy to the Midlands which Iâ&euro;&trade;m told are around 24 hours faster than equivalent road deliveries.</p> <p>And I welcome the progress Network Rail is making on the work needed to allow European gauge wagons from the Channel Tunnel to access the Barking and Dagenham freight terminals and provide an attractive alternative to road haulage on this strategically vital route.</p> <p>Sixthly and lastly, I can confirm that super-lorries will not be authorised to travel on UK roads by the new Government.</p> <p>Like our predecessors, we reject the proposal to pilot Longer Heavier vehicles exceeding 18.75 metres in length.</p> <p>Quite apart from the concerns of the rail freight industry, we simply do not believe the nationâ&euro;&trade;s roads are designed to deal with such vehicles and are not persuaded by the arguments for their introduction.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>In concluding my remarks this morning, Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to return to the wider economic picture.</p> <p>Of course, these are still early days for the new Coalition Government.</p> <p>But we are under no illusions about the gravity or the urgency of the task we face.</p> <p>We have to tackle the largest fiscal deficit in British peacetime history and kick-start our damaged economy.</p> <p>On top of this, we have to find a way to put Britain on a trajectory towards a low carbon economy to honour our environmental commitments and avert catastrophic climate change.</p> <p>Certainly, the transport sector will need to take its share of the pain in terms of tackling the deficit.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m afraid there is no escaping that.</p> <p>But it is self-evident that transport has a crucial role to play in getting Britain out of the mess weâ&euro;&trade;re in by helping to generate the jobs and economic growth we need to secure the recovery and enhance our competitiveness in the globalised world economy.</p> <p>And we have made clear our determination to put rail at the heart of our transport strategy and to reform the way the railways are run so they work better both for freight customers and passengers.</p> <p>Now I know the job of rail minister isnâ&euro;&trade;t easy at the best of times, certainly not during the age of austerity</p> <p>But I look forward to working with you here today and the rail freight industry as a whole, as together we seek ways to address the many difficult and demanding challenges we will face in the months and years to come.</p> <p>I am sure your industry will be equal to the challenge.</p> <p>Thank you</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:14:14.099600 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villers20100707 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech for Rail Freight Group Annual Conference Department for Transport 07 July 2010 2010-07-07T00:00:00 Rail Freight Group Annual Conference
<p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s both an honour and a great pleasure to be with you today as the new Aviation Minister.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to use this occasion to applaud the major contribution the airport industry makes both to the economy and to the lives of millions of people.</p> <p>From the jobs created to the communities connected the life-changing opportunities generated by air travel play a hugely important and positive role in modern Britain and I pay tribute to all of you here and the companies you represent for the work you do make that possible.</p> <p> <br />And itâ&euro;&trade;s always important to expressly acknowledge the special role regional airports play in the economy.</p> <p>So often at the heart of the regional economies they serve Iâ&euro;&trade;m sure everyone here will be well aware of the major importance of these airports and the connectivity they provide.</p> <p>Let me assure you that the new Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s aviation policy will always seek to take on board the regional airport perspective in the decisions we make.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why weâ&euro;&trade;ve asked the AOA to join the taskforce on airports in the south east to give a perspective from across the industry and across the country.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to assure you that the new Government is acutely aware of the grave challenges the industry as a whole faces right now.</p> <p>First you were hit by the world-wide recession which dented consumer confidence cut passenger numbers and hit jobs and profits.</p> <p>Then just as the UK began tentatively emerging from the devastating downturn the Eyja-fjalla-jokull volcano blasted millions of tons of ash into the atmosphere leading to unprecedented airspace restrictions across Europe.</p> <p>Add to that the ongoing and intense debate on the environmental impact of aviation both locally, in terms of noise and air quality, and globally, in terms climate change and itâ&euro;&trade;s clear the ingenuity, innovation and determination for which your industry is so well known will be stretched over the coming years.</p> <p>I am confident that you will rise to the challenge as you always have done in the past.</p> <p>And I want to assure that that creating the right conditions for a successful and sustainable future for the UKâ&euro;&trade;s airports and aviation industry is an important priority for this Government.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;d like to mention just a few examples of what weâ&euro;&trade;re doing to bring this about.</p> <p>Firstly, thereâ&euro;&trade;s the very difficult work we are undertaking to tackle the deficit put the economy on a sound footing and relieve the burden of red tape and regulation on the business community as a whole.</p> <p>There will be pain in the months and years to come as we seek to grapple with the devastating crisis in the public finances we inherited from our predecessors.</p> <p>But painful as it will be itâ&euro;&trade;s the only way to secure the economic stability needed for your industry and others to invest and flourish in the way needed to create jobs and revive prosperity.</p> <p>Secondly we need to take care to ensure that the reform of APD to which the Coalition is committed results in a new system which is both fair and workable.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;ll think to think carefully about how to achieve a reform that and delivers the goal of promoting a switch to flying greener fuller plans but does so without imposing disproportionate burdens on your industry.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ll be working with Treasury colleagues with this aim in mind.</p> <p>Having had extensive and productive discussions on this issue with your industry in Opposition Iâ&euro;&trade;m keen for that dialogue to continue in Government.</p> <p>Thirdly, we want to support your efforts in improving the passenger experience.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why, in the Queenâ&euro;&trade;s Speech, we announced a Bill to modernise airport economic regulation.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s also the reason that I will be chairing the newly established South East Airports Taskforce.</p> <p>This Group will explore options for making the best use of existing airport infrastructure within the capacity constraints the new Government has set with its decision to rule out new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted.</p> <p>Fourthly it is clear that we need to keep security arrangements at our airports under constant review so that we can deliver the twin goals of maintaining high standards for passenger security and minimising the hassle security procedures cause.</p> <p>There can be no doubt that measures needed to address the heightened terror threat have come at the cost of a deterioration in the passenger experience not to mention the obvious financial cost to airports and airlines.</p> <p>There are no simple answers here but we will strive for progress and improvement in this area.</p> <p>For a start Iâ&euro;&trade;d say we need a more intelligent approach with a greater focus on outcomes leaving more flexibility for operators in determining the best way to deliver those outcomes.</p> <p>Fifthly and finally I would highlight the urgent work we are undertaking with the CAA with airlines and with manufacturers on volcanic ash.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;re acutely aware that the threat has not gone away.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;re also acutely aware of the gravity of the impact of the crisis on the airports and aviation industry and passengers.</p> <p>So weâ&euro;&trade;re determined to continue to make real progress in improving the robustness of the regulatory framework and strengthening the UKâ&euro;&trade;s resilience in the face of any recurrence of volcanic activity.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>To conclude ladies and gentleman the ash cloud crisis provided a vivid and timely reminder of just how dependent we all are on flying.</p> <p>Whether itâ&euro;&trade;s for business or leisure tourism or trade air travel is woven into the fabric of our modern way of life in our increasingly inter-connected and inter-dependent world.</p> <p>So, yes, thereâ&euro;&trade;s clearly no shortage of challenges ahead.</p> <p>But I am confident that working together we have every chance of meeting those challenges improving the passenger experience and creating the right conditions for a successful and sustainable future for our airports and aviation industry.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:14:25.573164 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villers20100707b The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech to AOA Summer reception Department for Transport 07 July 2010 2010-07-07T00:00:00 AOA Summer reception
<p>Thank you for that kind introduction Adrian and thank you for inviting me to make a contribution to tonightâ&euro;&trade;s proceedings.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s an absolute pleasure to be here - and for two reasons.</p> <p>First, I get to make one of my very first speeches as Transport Secretary to an expert audience, at an important eventâ&euro;&ldquo; so no pressure there.</p> <p>And second, I get a chance to a say a big thank you for all that you do.</p> <p>London First and its members make a real and positive difference to our Capital and our country - your commitment and sheer hard work play a huge part in communicating the message that Britain is very definitely open for business.</p> <p>London First is always listened to and definitely taken seriously.</p> <p>And, at the risk of making her blush, one of the keys to London Firstâ&euro;&trade;s success is right here tonight â&euro;&ldquo; Jo Valentine.</p> <p>Take it from me - nobody lobbies on behalf of Londonâ&euro;&trade;s business community quite like Jo.</p> <p>In fact, while I was Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Jo spent so much time knocking on my door and phoning me up that, at one stage, I felt as if I was being stalked.</p> <p>If they make lobbying an Olympic sport in time for the 2012 Games then Jo will definitely be in the frame for a gold medal.</p> <p>Jo â&euro;&ldquo; it was a pleasure working with you and London First in opposition and I look forward to doing so in government.</p> <h2>The Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s wider agenda</h2> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m conscious that I have the privilege of being the first Cabinet Minister to address this organisation since the General Election.</p> <p>The election was historic in every sense of the word. And its end result is a coalition government united by a common determination to tackle the fiscal crisis we inherit and a shared vision of Britainâ&euro;&trade;s road back to prosperity.</p> <p>So, before I move on to deal with the specific issue of transport, I want to briefly talk about the key components of the Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s wider agenda.</p> <p>Our first goal is to restore balanced and sustainable growth â&euro;&ldquo; so of course that means getting the public finances back on track. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s our a top priority.</p> <p>But it also means supporting enterprise, getting credit flowing and rebuilding business confidence so that the private sector can generate the growth that will get us back on track.</p> <p>And, because we want to protect our environment, as well as strengthen our economy, we regard a low carbon future as the only viable future for Britain.</p> <p>We believe in a new politics where people can hold ministers and public services to account - where much greater transparency is the norm and where that transparency itself becomes a driver of behaviour change in the way Government works.</p> <p>But we also want this country to be a place where people think about their obligations as well as their rights.</p> <p>So, as well as protecting civil liberties and modernising our democracy, weâ&euro;&trade;ll promote individual and social responsibility as the building blocks for a better Britain.</p> <p>An economy thatâ&euro;&trade;s strong and stable; an environment thatâ&euro;&trade;s clean and green, a society thatâ&euro;&trade;s free and fairâ&euro;&ldquo; thatâ&euro;&trade;s the essence of the Coaltion programme for Government: the shared vision we are determined to make a reality.</p> <h2>A radically changed economic landscape</h2> <p>But all of our work, all that this Government hopes to achieve is set against the backdrop of the inherited fiscal crisis â&euro;&ldquo; a crisis that has radically changed the economic landscape.</p> <p>The legacy of debt is recognised by the theme of this very event.</p> <p>Indeed, as Jo said in her recent Evening Standard article, the deficit is â&euro;&ldquo; â&euro;&oelig;the biggest challenge facing the Prime Minister and his team.â&euro;?</p> <p>As a Government, as a country, we have no option but to confront the debt crisis head on. And deal with it now.</p> <p>This is the only way to restore confidence in our economy, protect our credit rating and help keep interest rates lower for longer to support the recovery.</p> <p>If we ignore the debt crisis, if we act like a by-stander government hoping that it will go away of its own accord, then the consequences will be as stark as they are certain - no growth and no recovery.</p> <p>And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why we are acting and acting immediately.</p> <p>The Prime Minister has consistently said that we will cut the fiscal deficit in a way that protects the poorest and most vulnerable in our society â&euro;&ldquo; so compassion and fairness are at the core of our approach and we will strive to win hearts and minds and take people with us as we embark on this Herculean task.</p> <p>Never-the-less, getting the deficit down, and keeping it down, will require hard choices and tough decisions.</p> <p>Some will be deeply unpopular. Of that I have absolutely no doubt. But we will not shrink from taking them because, to do otherwise would lead us to disaster.</p> <p>Weâ&euro;&trade;ve already laid out our plans to achieve over £6 billion of savings this year - for example, through a recruitment freeze, reducing the costs of QUANGOs, renegotiating contracts with major suppliers across government and taking an axe to discretionary spending.</p> <p>And, my Department is playing its full role in delivering these savings - £683 million worth to be exact.</p> <p>And that is just a first instalment. The emergency budget next week will set out further reductions in public spending for the years ahead.</p> <p>Sir Alan Buddâ&euro;&trade;s report yesterday, with its sobering review of Britainâ&euro;&trade;s real growth prospects over the next few years will provides an independent forecast against which the Chancellorâ&euro;&trade;s budget will be framed: a much needed move to evidence-based policy making.</p> <h2>London â&euro;&ldquo; the beating heart</h2> <p>There is a new economic reality and all of us, government and business, will have to adapt to it and work within it.</p> <p>But, in these times of challenge and change, one thing is certain, one thing remains constant â&euro;&ldquo; London is the beating heart of our national economy.</p> <p>And transport is Londonâ&euro;&trade;s lifeblood â&euro;&ldquo; a vital support to its future prosperity.</p> <p>And, if proof were needed of the crucial role played by this City and its transport networks then it can be found in London Firstâ&euro;&trade;s latest research.</p> <p>The â&euro;&oelig;Greater Returnsâ&euro;? report youâ&euro;&trade;ve just launched is a timely one, with a Budget and a Spending Review fast looming, focusing as it does on how we should prioritise and where we should invest.</p> <p>Itâ&euro;&trade;s an important contribution to the debate about the future of our economy and our transport system. I will study its findings with interest â&euro;&ldquo; and I hope my colleagues at the Treasury will do the same.</p> <h2>Working smarter</h2> <p>So we need to protect and enhance Londonâ&euro;&trade;s transport infrastructure. But we cannot bury our heads in the sand and ignore the wider fiscal climate.</p> <p>London has already shared in the in-year efficiency savings in the Transport budget. And if budgets are further reduced in the Spending Review, London will, of course, have to take its share of the burden. We are all in this together.</p> <p>The challenge for all of us â&euro;&ldquo; a challenge our best businesses face daily â&euro;&ldquo; is to absorb budget reductions through efficiency gains, not by cutting services and projects.</p> <p>That means working smarter and ending waste, improving productivity and prioritising spending. In short, doing more with less.</p> <p>The scale of the challenge is awe-inspiring:</p> <p>Every day over 24 million journeys are made in the Capital.</p> <p>Every month more than 9 million passengers pass through Londonâ&euro;&trade;s airports.</p> <p>And every year 53 million tonnes of cargo are loaded or unloaded at the port of London - making it the countryâ&euro;&trade;s second busiest port and a vital gateway to the global superhighway of the seas.</p> <p>And all the graphs point inexorably upward.</p> <p>So I know that, whether itâ&euro;&trade;s investment in airports and seaports, or increasing road and rail capacity, every section of Londonâ&euro;&trade;s business community will have its own priorities and favoured projects.</p> <p>But I also know that you will understand better than any audience the need for an utterly rigorous approach to the spending of scarce taxpayer funding.</p> <p>That demands we do three things:</p> <p>First, get the most out of what we already have by sweating public assets - just as a good business will sweat private ones. So, for example, we have to actively manage our roads, targeting modest investments to clear bottlenecks; maximising the value of networks.</p> <p>Second, apply a rigorous cost-benefit analysis to infrastructure projects and proposals, targeting taxpayersâ&euro;&trade; money where it really makes a difference;</p> <p>And third, ruthlessly controlling costs of the projects we are undertaking â&euro;&ldquo; relentlessly value-engineering, risk managing â&euro;&ldquo; leaving no stone unturned in pursuit of value for taxpayersâ&euro;&trade; money.</p> <p>And that brings me to Crossrail and Thameslink.</p> <p>Both vital projects for London. Both supported by business - and both supported by this Government.</p> <p>As a practical sign of that support I paid a visit to the Crossrail station site at Canary Wharf earlier today.</p> <p>And Iâ&euro;&trade;m pleased to report that, not only is it an impressive feat of engineering; it is on time, and on budget.</p> <p>I believe that Crossrail and Thameslink can be growth generators, not only for London, but for the South East and the whole of the UK.</p> <p>But they need to be tested and re-tested at every stage and along every mile so that we engineer costs down and drive value for money up.</p> <p>And let me be clear â&euro;&ldquo; this is not just a fiscal responsibility. In the current public spending climate, itâ&euro;&trade;s a moral obligation.</p> <p>These transport projects have an able and articulate advocate in the shape of the Mayor.</p> <p>In standing up for the people, and the businesses, of London Boris has proved himself a city-wide innovator, as well as a city-wide champion.</p> <p>So I will work closely with the Mayor â&euro;&ldquo; as well as with Transport for London and Network Rail - to make sure we achieve those efficiency savings and get the best return for every last penny of public money invested in Crossrail and Thameslink.</p> <p>But, Londonâ&euro;&trade;s transport infrastructure doesnâ&euro;&trade;t begin and end with these two projects â&euro;&ldquo; as important as they are.</p> <p>Just yards away from where we are now we have the magnificence of St Pancras as an example of what has been achieved, and next to it, Kings Cross, well advanced with a bid to rival it as a gateway to this great city.</p> <p>Less visible, but every bit as important, is London Undergroundâ&euro;&trade;s major programme of investment in the tube.</p> <p>Again, as well as looking to the Mayor to be relentless in pursuit of efficiency savings in this programme, Iâ&euro;&trade;ll be working with him and his team to make sure the new arrangements for Tube Lines demonstrate continuing value for money for taxpayers and farepayers.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;ll also be engaging constructively with Boris on a range of other issues that matter to the communities and businesses of our City â&euro;&ldquo; from tackling the scourge of over-running street-works, to promoting cleaner and greener travel, to ensuring the 2012 Olympics is a window to the world for all that is great about London and Britain.</p> <p>Another challenge of our time is finding innovative ways of funding capital expenditure and attracting investment.</p> <p>So Iâ&euro;&trade;m especially pleased that the Mayor is doing just that by obtaining £25 million of sponsorship from Barclays for his cycle hire scheme and the new cycle super highways. In fact, Iâ&euro;&trade;m so impressed that I may yet be lured to ride one.</p> <p>Innovation, fresh thinking and partnership working are in the DNA of the business community.</p> <p>So Iâ&euro;&trade;m sure many of you here this evening will have ideas and proposals to put to us as we seek to tackle the crisis.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s something I welcome. And rest assured - Iâ&euro;&trade;ll have an open mind as well as an open door.</p> <h2>Heathrow - better not bigger</h2> <p>Something else we feel strongly about is that politicians should keep their promises. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s the only way weâ&euro;&trade;ll rebuild trust in politics.</p> <p>During the election, both of the partners in the Coalition made a manifesto promise to scrap the third runway.</p> <p>So, when I took up this job, day one, decision one was the cancellation of the third runway at Heathrow.</p> <p>Now I accept this hasnâ&euro;&trade;t been greeted with universal acclaim by business community â&euro;&ldquo; although it is also not true that all businesses favoured the runway project.</p> <p>But I believe we have made the right judgement call, for the right reasons.<br /> <br />And letâ&euro;&trade;s be clear - this decision does not mean we are anti-aviation.</p> <p>You have a Secretary of State, a Department and a Government that understands fully, and appreciates absolutely, the social and economic benefits of aviation.</p> <p>But we also listened to those who would be most affected by the original proposals for expanding Heathrow â&euro;&ldquo; as well as those for Gatwick and Stansted.</p> <p>And we carefully considered the wider environmental impacts in the context of our â&euro;&ldquo; and our predecessorsâ&euro;&trade; â&euro;&ldquo; clear commitments on cutting climate change.</p> <p>So, while that decision marks the closure of a chapter in the aviation debate, it also marks the opening of an important new one.</p> <p>Because I believe that what our Capital, our country and our companies need is a Heathrow thatâ&euro;&trade;s better, not bigger. </p> <p>A Heathrow that is properly linked to our planned nationwide high speed rail network. So that â&euro;&tilde;modal shiftâ&euro;&trade; can become a reality for domestic and even some short-haul European flights.</p> <p>But it doesnâ&euro;&trade;t end there.</p> <p>A better Heathrow should offer a world class service to the travelling public and to business users.</p> <p>Thatâ&euro;&trade;s the reason we outlined our important new plans in the Queen&#39;s Speech to drag the current model of airport economic regulation out of its outdated framework, and into the 21st century where it belongs.</p> <p>When you travel, your first encounter with any city is often through its airport.</p> <p>And, when you arrive in London, the airport should say something positive about the kind of city this is. It should leave people thinking what a great place to visit, what a great place to do business.</p> <p>What it should not say is â&euro;&oelig;never ending queues, time wasting delays and second rate serviceâ&euro;?.</p> <p>I believe our Airport Economic Regulation Bill will help ensure that this countryâ&euro;&trade;s airports always say the right thing and leave the right memory.</p> <p>In the spirit of raising the game at our airports, earlier today I announced the establishment of a South East Airports Taskforce made up of key players from across the industry.</p> <p>Chaired by my Minister of State, Theresa Villiers, itâ&euro;&trade;s job will be to write that new chapter in our aviation history, exploring how to get the most out of existing airport infrastructure and improve conditions for all users. And I am delighted to be able to tell you that the group will include a representative from London First.</p> <h2>Concluding remarks</h2> <p>Tonight Iâ&euro;&trade;ve talked about this Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s wider agenda; I hope Iâ&euro;&trade;ve given you a flavour of our broad vision for the sort of transport system we want to build; and Iâ&euro;&trade;ve spoken about the consequences of the radically changed economic landscape we now find ourselves in.<br />But, before I conclude, I want to leave you with one last observation - and itâ&euro;&trade;s about this great metropolis.</p> <p>Because, the real question is not whether London, like the rest of the country, and indeed much of the world, faces challenging times.</p> <p>The real question is whether London has the people and the businesses, the capacity and the character to meet those challenges head on and beat them hands down.</p> <p>And I have no doubt whatsoever that the answer to that question is an unequivocal Yes.</p> <p>There are always things we could do better; thereâ&euro;&trade;s always progress to be made.</p> <p>But letâ&euro;&trade;s not sell this City, or the people who live and work in it, short.</p> <p>London has advantages that other major cities around the world can only dream of:</p> <ul> <li>The language</li> <li>The time zone</li> <li>The sophistication of our business services</li> <li>The scale and breadth of our financial sector</li> <li>The global reputation of our legal system</li> <li>The unparalleled cultural life of our city.</li> </ul> <p>I am absolutely not complacent. But fate and history have dealt London a winning hand. If we lose the game it will not be the fault of the cards we hold.</p> <p>But, a world class city needs world class transport.</p> <p>I know thatâ&euro;&trade;s your ambition for London.</p> <p>Tonight I came here to tell you that itâ&euro;&trade;s also mine â&euro;&ldquo; and itâ&euro;&trade;s one that, by working together and by working smarter, we can deliver.</p> <p>Over the coming years, how we respond to the fiscal crisis; how we invest our scarce resources; how we rebuild a sustainable and diverse economy; all of these things will determine whether our city retains its place at the top of the worldâ&euro;&trade;s premier league. And I certainly didnâ&euro;&trade;t go into Government to preside over a relegation.</p> <p>The challenges will be great â&euro;&ldquo; but I know we will rise to them and ensure that London remains the vibrant heart of a dynamic and prosperous Britain.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> 2011-05-06T16:14:31.255087 http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond100615 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP Speech to London First Department for Transport 15 June 2010 2010-06-15T00:00:00 London First
<p>Each year an incredible 1.3 million people are killed and 50 million are injured on the worldâ&euro;&trade;s roads. Politicians often use words like incredible, but when I saw those figures I asked someone to check them. They are correct and they are mind-numbing figures. Equally chilling is the fact that, on current trends, road fatalities could become the worldâ&euro;&trade;s fifth biggest killer by 2030. These facts and figures demonstrate that road safety is a truly global issue. They also remind us of the motivation for the UN Decade of Action â&euro;&ldquo; a decade in which, with the right focus, action and policies, countless lives will be saved in the years ahead.</p> <p>Britain is rightly proud of its road safety record. Our highways are among the safest roads in the world and we have seen significant decreases in our casualty figures. But, in spite of all we have achieved, we still lose six or seven people to road accidents in this country every day of the week. Every road death is a grim statistic â&euro;&ldquo; but it is also a personal tragedy. And, as well as the terrible human cost, there is a heavy economic price to pay. Again, I had to have these figures checked - in Britain, the economic welfare costs are estimated at around £16 billion a year, while insurance payouts for motoring claims alone are now over £12 billion a year.</p> <p>So there is no room for complacency â&euro;&ldquo; and thatâ&euro;&trade;s why today the Government has launched its new Strategic Framework for Road Safety. The core principle underpinning our new strategy is that, with limited resources available, we need to target the most dangerous behaviours: focusing police and court time on those who deliberately engage in anti-social and dangerous driving behaviour, while supporting the generally law-abiding motorist to address poor driving skills or lapses of behaviour that could put him or her and other road users at risk.</p> <h3>Education</h3> <p>The strategy will be delivered both nationally and locally. The new Framework sets out those measures that we intend to take <span style="text-decoration: underline">nationally,</span> together with the areas where policy and delivery will reflect <span style="text-decoration: underline">local</span> priorities and circumstances. The national measures focus on two key strands â&euro;&ldquo; education and enforcement. Let me take each of them in turn. As Iâ&euro;&trade;ve said, we want to support basically law-abiding road users to address poor driving skills â&euro;&ldquo; to nudge their behaviour in the right direction. That means more educational options for drivers who make genuine mistakes, display poor skills or commit occasional low level offences - to improve their driving, support to develop safer skills and appropriate attitudes to driving. In appropriate cases, low level offenders will be offered a place on a police-approved education course (at their cost) instead of a fixed penalty charges and licence points. We know from experience that properly designed education courses can have a positive impact on driving behaviour. But our education initiative will go further: we will reform the regime for rehabiliting disqualified drivers - so that the most serious offenders who are disqualified from driving have to complete re-training and a mandatory new test before they regain their licence.</p> <p>We will also continue to build on the recent improvements weâ&euro;&trade;ve made to our driving and motorcycle tests And weâ&euro;&trade;ll develop a new post-driving test vocational qualification â&euro;&ldquo; designed to help newly qualified drivers gain the necessary skills and experience to be safe and responsible road users - and to demonstrate that they have gained those skills to would-be insurers. The better the education and the better the training, the more we can enhance the safety of all road users, whether they are pedestrians or cyclists, drivers or motorcyclists. I also want to correct what I believe has been an overly narrow emphasis on automatically-detected speed-related offences, at the expense of tackling other equally or more risky behaviours such as tailgating, under-taking and weaving.</p> <p>Since 1985 the number of prosecutions for careless driving has plummeted by three-quarters as time-consuming prosecution through the courts has been deemed a lower priority by police. So we will introduce a new fixed penalty notice for careless driving to help the police to tackle risky behaviour, such as tailgating, that currently tends to go unenforced, in an efficient and effective manner. Freeing up police and court resources to focus on the most dangerous drivers. This will also enable careless driving offenders to be diverted to the new educational courses offered where appropriate to those receiving fixed penalty notices. At the same time, we will increase the level of fixed penalty notices for many road traffic offences from £60 to £80-£100 plus penalty points. The current levels have fallen behind other fixed penalties offences and the lower levels for traffic offences risk trivialising the offences.</p> <h3>Enforcement</h3> <p>Sadly, it isn&#39;t just about educating the well-intentioned. Alongside those who make genuine mistakes or have poor skills, but who want to do the right thing, there are also a minority hard-core of dangerous road users who commit serious, deliberate and repeated offences. Not because of poor skills, but because of bad attitude - and a reckless disregard of risk. These people are a danger to themselves and to others and, in order to tackle <span style="text-decoration: underline">their</span> negligence and target <span style="text-decoration: underline">their</span> recklessness, we will enhance the enforcement and sanctions regime. An effective deterrent requires credible sanctions. So, in addition to using innovative ways to recover unpaid fines, we will also work to make full use of existing powers for the courts to seize and crush an offender&#39;s vehicle.</p> <p>Iâ&euro;&trade;m also determined to increase the effectiveness of drink and drug drive enforcement and cut reoffending, as set out in our response to the North report on Drink and Drug Driving in March. One of the great successes of road safety over the last 40 years has been the extent to which drink driving has become socially unacceptable - and largely in consequence, the number of people killed in drink driving accidents has fallen by more than 75% since 1979. But sadly, people <span style="text-decoration: underline">are</span> still losing their lives because of drink driving â&euro;&ldquo; in 2009, 380 people were killed in drink driving collisions - about 17% of all of the fatalities on the road for that year. So we need to take tough action against the small minority of drivers who donâ&euro;&trade;t give a second thought to the law and who put their lives in danger by drink driving and also the lives of others. They have ignored the shift in social attitudes; they ignore the risks they are taking and they ignore the drink driving limit. Shockingly, 40% of those who fail the alcohol breath test are more than two and a half times the permitted limit. A lower limit would not make this reckless minority change their behaviour. Their behaviour is entrenchedâ&euro;&ldquo; and so we have concluded that improving enforcement will have more impact on these dangerous people than lowering the limit.</p> <p>So we are toughening up the enforcement regimes. We are revoking the right for drivers who are over the limit on a breath test to request a blood or urine test - eliminating the opportunity for delay that over the years has allowed countless drink drivers to get away with their offence. We will also be launching a more robust drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, providing high quality education courses, and requiring drink-drivers who were substantially over the limit to take remedial training and a linked driving assessment â&euro;&ldquo; as well as a medical examination - before recovering their licence.</p> <p>Drink driving kills. But it is just as dangerous for people to drive impaired by drugs, and it is quite wrong that it is easier at present to get away with one than the other. So there needs to be a clear message that drug-drivers are as likely to be caught and punished as drink-drivers. We are working to approve drug testing devices and we will change the law to speed up the testing process, ensuring the police can bring drug drivers to justice.  We are also exploring the introduction of a new offence â&euro;&ldquo; alongside the existing offence â&euro;&ldquo; which would relieve the need for the police to prove impairment case-by-case where a specified drug at a specified level has been detected in the blood stream. We are determined, over time, to make drug-driving as socially unacceptable as drink-driving has become.</p> <p>There is also a significant correlation between uninsured driving and other road traffic offending. While we believe we will now make progress against uninsured drivers â&euro;&ldquo; with the introduction of Continuous Insurance Enforcement - we are clear that this is an area that requires further work to arrive at a fully effective package of measures. The rising cost of insurance will surely tempt more and more to take the risk. So we will consider introducing proportionate penalties for uninsured driving, to ensure that the cost of offending is better matched to the cost of insurance, while continuing to work with the insurance industry on measures that help to reduce the cost of motor insurance to make it more affordable over time.</p> <h3>Localism</h3> <p>Our new Strategy we are publishing today makes it clear that, while targets sometimes have their place, we do not consider over-arching national targets to be the most appropriate means of improving road safety in Britain. None-the-less, government at the national level has a crucial part to play in improving road safety - from delivering better driving standards and testing, to enhancing enforcement and education, right through to the way it manages the countryâ&euro;&trade;s strategic road infrastructure. So yes, we recognise the positive difference that central Government can make. But we also believe in the potential and possibilities offered by localism. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why our Strategic Framework acknowledges that local communities also have a vital role in making roads as safe as they can be. Local service deliverers do not need civil servants in Whitehall to tell them how important road safety is. Nor do they need central diktats that constrain their local ambitions and priorities.</p> <p>Instead of more suffocating bureaucracy and top down government, we will devolve decision making and empower people at the local level. Enabling the creation of local solutions tailored to meet local challenges - recognising that the road safety challenges we face are different in different parts of the country - whether it is setting local speed limits, or choosing the most appropriate traffic management schemes. By giving local authorities more freedom to assess and act on their own priorities, we will see better targeted, more effective local action. We will provide an economic toolkit to assist local authorities in assessing the full costs and benefits when considering speed limits - helping them to ensure that their decisions on speed limits are consistent and transparent to the communities they serve. And we will move to a more sophisticated method of monitoring progress through a Road Safety Outcomes Framework, which will help local authorities assess and prioritise their action as well as showing the impact of central Government measures.</p> <p>We also want citizens to play a more active role in championing the cause of road safety in their areas. So we will ensure that more information is made available to help them to hold their local authorities and service providers to account and to enable them to compare the performance of their area against other similar areas. And that ability to compare is critical, the gap between the best and worst performing authorities is very significant. If the bottom half of highway authorities upped their game to the mid point authority, the number of killed and seriously injured casualties could decrease by 14%....thatâ&euro;&trade;s 3,500 fewer deaths or seriously injured every year. Our localism agenda is a radical transfer of power and information from Whitehall to the town hall and from Downing Street to the local High Street. It helps to build capacity, increase transparency and strengthen accountability. And it will enable local people to come together, to work together and build the types of neighbourhoods and communities that they want to live in.</p> <h3>Concluding remarks</h3> <p>Road safety is everybodyâ&euro;&trade;s business â&euro;&ldquo; we all have a stake in making our highways as safe as they can be. And in spreading our best practice in the UK to the many parts of the world with road safety records that are very far behind. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s why the UN Decade of Action is so important. Itâ&euro;&trade;s also why road safety is a first order issue for me and for this Government. Britain has made great progress down the years in making our roads safer. We want that progress to continue and the Strategic Framework we are publishing today will take that agenda forward. My very clear message today is that we will work with the grain of human nature: encouraging and assisting drivers who occasionally lapse or who suffer from poor skills - the basically law-abiding majority - to become a safe and responsible motorists. We are not against them, we are with them and we will work to help them. But on those who wilfully and recklessly put themselves and others at risk, we will focus the resources of law-enforcement with a new determination.</p> <p>Thank you</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> None http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/hammond20110511 The Rt Hon Philip Hammond MP Strategic Framework for Road Safety Department for Transport 11 May 2011 2011-05-11 00:00:00 United Nations Decade of Action Launch Event, Great Minster House, London
<p>Thank you for that introduction. Finding the best way for aviation to grow sustainably and successfully is among the most important transport challenges we face in the modern world.  This morning, some of the most knowledgeable commentators from different sides of the debate have discussed their perspectives on that difficult task. Iâ&euro;&trade;m delighted now to have this opportunity to set out elements of the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s approach to delivering an aviation industry that can thrive and prosper while alsoaddressing its local environmental impacts and plays its part in combating climate change.</p> <p>Today, aviation generates around £11 billion a year and employs around 200,000 people directly. It drives our multi-billion pound tourism sector and it helps this island nation trade with the rest of the world by providing vital international connectivity.  On the other hand, as other sectors start to decarbonise, aviationâ&euro;&trade;s overall share of carbon emissions looks set to grow significantly in future years unless action is taken. But I think itâ&euro;&trade;s a mistake to see this issue as a binary choice between economic and environmental concerns. The steps needed to decarbonise the economy can open up significant economic opportunities for this country.</p> <p>Over the past three years this country has learned a bitter lesson that unsustainable growth fuelled by spiralling levels of government and personal debt can end up being counter-productive and fraught with risk. Well growth which is very heavily dependent on dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and which leaves a hugely expensive climate legacy for future generations also has a major economic downside. As we see Middle East instability push oil prices up the energy security benefits of decarbonising our economy become ever clearer.</p> <h2>The Coalition&#39;s approach</h2> <p>One of the Coalitionâ&euro;&trade;s first acts in Government was to cancel the third runway at Heathrow and make clear that we would not support new runways at Gatwick or Stansted. Building new runways at our three busiest airports would have made it more difficult to meet our commitments on climate change and left us paying too high a price in terms of the local environmental impact on surrounding communities. The DfT Business Plan promises to make the promotion of sustainable aviation one of our five overall priorities for structural reform.</p> <p>In a few weeks time, we will publish an aviation policy scoping document, asking strategic questions to inform the development of a sustainable framework for the future of UK aviation. We aim to conclude that process in 2013 after a wide ranging national debate and extensive engagement with industry, environmentalists, community groups and the full range of stakeholders.</p> <p>In recent years, the debate has become increasingly polarised. We want to try to build more of a consensus that recognises the crucial benefits that aviation brings to our society and our economy, but also acknowledges the need for restraint and for aviation to do more to address its environmental impacts. However, the process for producing that strategy over the next two years does not mean we stand still on our efforts to deliver important aviation policy goals.</p> <h2>Better not bigger</h2> <p>I fully recognise how vital it is that our major airports provide efficient and high quality gateways to the rest of the world. So I want to emphasise that our decision to reject three new runways does not mean that we donâ&euro;&trade;t care about the quality of service provided by our airports. Our decision to reject those three runways means that it has become even more important to make the most of the airport capacity we already have, in the UK in general and south east in particular. I strongly believe that there are significant changes we can make to improve the quality of the passenger experience within current capacity constraints. In short, it is possible to make our airports better without having to make them bigger and weâ&euro;&trade;ve got a range of initiatives underway to deliver that.</p> <p>We will be introducing legislation in the next Parliamentary session to modernise and improve airport economic regulation to improve the quality of service that passengers receive at designated airports. Rather than focusing the bulk of regulatory action on a single price review every five years, the new licence based system we propose should enhance the effectiveness of the CAA by enabling it to intervene more quickly if an airport is failing its customers.  Put simply, weâ&euro;&trade;ll give the CAA the powers it needs to become a more responsive regulator throughout the control period, not just every five years.</p> <p>We have established the South East Airports Taskforce to harness industry expertise to help deliver the change needed to improve the passenger experience for air travellers. The remit of the Taskforce focuses on Gatwick, Heathrow and Stansted but I firmly believe that its work will also benefit other airports across the country.</p> <p>We want to create the right conditions for regional airports to flourish.  They have an important role to play in the regional economies we want ensure they are successful as part of our efforts to close the prosperity gap between north and south. So it is important that the work of the Taskforce benefits airports across the country.</p> <p>The issues the group is considering include border queues, security and resilience. Securing our border against crime, terror and illegal immigration is vital in these difficult times. We are working with the Home Office and the UK Border Agency on improving the way border checks are conducted for air passengers. The impressive work being done by UKBA, particularly with new technology, is focused on delivering this crucial policy goal in a way which minimises inconvenience for passengers.</p> <p>We are also analysing ways in which the regulatory framework for aviation security might be reformed to address security queues and improve efficiency while maintaining the same high levels of passenger security, or better. The aviation industry told us that the system we inherited from the last Government can be too prescriptive and process-driven. So we are working on a fresh approach that will set the industry demanding outcomes to achieve but give them more flexibility to find the best and most efficient and passenger friendly way to deliver those outcomes.</p> <p>A Taskforce sub-group led by the CAA is looking at resilience and delays.  We hope to find collaborative solutions and improvements to operating practices that both airports and airlines can sign up to. Getting buy in from both sides can enhance the effectiveness of the changes weâ&euro;&trade;re discussing.</p> <p>I also believe that delivering the Single European Sky programme could deliver major improvements on delays, resilience and airport efficiency.  The issue itâ&euro;&trade;s designed to address can perhaps best be illustrated by the following facts. Europe has around 60 major air traffic control centres. The US has less than half that number but manages more than double the number of flights.  Rather than splitting responsibility along national boundaries, the Single European Sky project aims to see airspace managed using much larger units known as Functional Airspace blocks. Our British and Irish FAB is the first to be operational in Europe and is already delivering improvements in fuel consumption and emission reductions. SES has the potential to generate economic, safety and environmental benefits; crucially it could reduce the need for stacking.</p> <h2>International action</h2> <p>But we also need action at a global level if we are to deliver a sustainable and successful future for aviation. So we will press ahead with efforts to negotiate access for UK based airlines to new markets. Weâ&euro;&trade;re also committed to including aviation in the EU Emissions Trading System. We are also working through ICAO and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change to push for international agreement on aviation emissions. Progress has been slow in recent years but the first major ICAO conference in which this Government took part saw a modest step forward. ICAO adopted an aspirational global goal for stabilising emissions from international civil aviation from 2020 onwards. We are also actively contributing to technical work to set international CO2 emissions standards for new aircraft types, and to devise metrics for reporting aviation CO2 emissions.  It may not grab headlines but this detailed work is pivotal if we are to make real progress at a global level.</p> <h2>Technology</h2> <p>Technology is of course crucial to delivering our aviation policy goals and Britain can be at the forefront of that technological change. Indeed, UK technology and know-how is already playing a major role in making commercial airliners more fuel efficient.  We can be proud of the fact that new aircraft like the Airbus A350 and Boeing 787 Dreamliner feature so much British engineering excellence, including British wings and British engines.  Together these new aircraft will increase efficiency for passengers, reduce emissions around airports and help address noise problems. And over the horizon, I hope we can look forward to real advances on biofuels. Though I think itâ&euro;&trade;s wise to admit there is no miracle technical solution round the corner on carbon or noise, technology may provide some of the answers.</p> <h2>Noise</h2> <p>Through ICAOâ&euro;&trade;s Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection, we are making a similar contribution to technical work on international noise standards for new aircraft types. We fully recognise the concern felt about aircraft noise and the impact it has on quality of life. This was a key factor in our decision to say no to new runways at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted. So early in my tenure as Aviation Minister I confirmed we would not revive Labourâ&euro;&trade;s proposals on mixed mode and that we could continue to support runway alternation at Heathrow and the much valued respite it provides for those under the airportâ&euro;&trade;s densely occupied flight path.</p> <p>We want to provide clear and stretching objectives for industry to reduce noise impact of flights by improving aircraft technology and operating procedures. And weâ&euro;&trade;re working through ICAO to deliver that on an international basis, as well improvements air navigation and airspace management to deliver quieter approaches and climbs. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s in addition to the progress we are pushing for through the CAAâ&euro;&trade;s Future Airspace Strategy and the SES programme Iâ&euro;&trade;ve already referred to.</p> <p>And of course Iâ&euro;&trade;m acutely aware that the debate on night noise will intensify in the coming months. I fully recognise that night noise is widely accepted as one of the least acceptable impacts of aviation. The current night restrictions regime for the three main London airports is due to expire in October next year.  I know that the stakeholders and communities affected are keenly waiting news on this. I would like to assure this audience that I consider this to be one of the most important tasks I will face as Aviation Minister and that getting the right answer on this issue is a personal priority for me.  I hope to make an announcement soon about how the process will go forward for establishing the successor arrangements to the current regime.</p> <h2>High Speed Rail</h2> <p>Ladies and gentlemen, today Iâ&euro;&trade;ve tried to give you a snapshot of some of the work we are doing to improve our airports and promote sustainable aviation, but I want to cover one last crucial element of our strategy for getting the best out of our airports and that is our ambitious plans to deliver a high speed rail network for this country. Experience around Europe shows how attractive high speed rail journeys are when they compete with short haul aviation. Taking just two examples of many, Air France has entirely stopped flying between Paris and Brussels and charters high speed TGV trains instead, and flights between Madrid and Barcelona plummeted when the high speed line opened. The high speed network we propose connecting London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds will have consequences beyond those cities. For example, running trains on to the new network from Scotland could cut journey times from Glasgow and Edinburgh to London to as little as 3½ hours. Now Deutsche Bahn hope to start running direct services from London to Amsterdam, Frankfurt and Cologne, in addition to Eurostarâ&euro;&trade;s Brussels and Paris routes.  At present, there are probably around 140,000 flights every year between these destinations and airports in the South East. 140,000 flights! Providing a viable rail substitute for even a modest proportion of those flights could release significant capacity at our crowded airports, enabling them to focus on routes where flying is the only option, such as for long haul and brick economy destinations, enabling us to get better economic value from our airports within current capacity constraints.</p> <p>Ladies and gentlemen, there is no doubt that completion of the high speed rail network we propose be a long and arduous process. You only have to glance at the pages of the national newspapers every morning to realise that, but I firmly believe that it will be worth the effort. Not just because our plans will radically change the economic geography of this country and help us tackle a north south divide problem which has defied solution for decades, but also because high speed rail can transform the debate that has raged for some many years on airport capacity in the South East.  Formidable challenges lie ahead, whether itâ&euro;&trade;s on high speed rail or the future of aviation. I look forward to working with you all in addresses those challenges so that we deliver the sustainable growth and sustainable aviation that we need for a successful and competitive future for the UK economy.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> None http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20110317 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP Speech to Westminster Energy, Environment and Transport Forum Department for Transport 17 March 2011 2011-03-17 00:00:00 Environment and Transport Forum, London
<p>It is a pleasure to be here to address such a wide range of businesses. Many thanks to all who have turned up early in the morning for this. One of the problems about addressing people at the start of a conference is having to do the â&euro;&oelig;housekeeping announcementsâ&euro;? â&euro;&ldquo; what to do in the event of a fire and so on. Well, I used to be a fireman, so if there <em>is</em> a fire, follow me!</p> <p>The main message I wish to give today is that it is vitally important that you see Government as a friend rather than as a hindrance. We donâ&euro;&trade;t want to prevent you carrying out business and developing new industry; rather, we want to support you.</p> <p>The brief given to me today (which, to the delight of my civil servants, I am not going to follow completely), mentions safer roads, safer technology, and greener technology. What I will also lay particular stress on is the issue of growth. You donâ&euro;&trade;t need me to lecture you about this countryâ&euro;&trade;s financial situation. But no matter how many cuts we make â&euro;&ldquo; and I think that this department has done relatively well out of the recent spending decisions â&euro;&ldquo; we cannot get out of the financial situation we are in without growth. Growth necessarily involves better transport. And better transport means sweating our assets, and using them in a better, greener, way.</p> <p>Introducing new technology is very important to this. However, even if, tomorrow, every single car on the road were to be an electric one, weâ&euro;&trade;d still have the issues of road safety and road infrastructure to deal with. My Department is already looking at ways to improve both areas; you will hear a lot about managed motorways and average speed cameras, and we are very keen to continue on this. But the question for today is: what else can be done? What can be done now, and in the mid-term, and then in the long-term?</p> <p>I should mention that in this part of the world, a lot of what we are thinking about is a novelty. Countries such as Japan have already made significant progress, and Europe will have to catch up, and catch up fast.</p> <p>I hope that, today, we will learn something from you and that you will learn something from us. In front of you, you have a new team, both in terms of the Ministers in the Department for Transport, and, more widely, in the new Coalition Government. Therefore, please consider this the first stage of a new relationship with a new team, a relationship using new processes. Come to us with your ideas and your inventions, for today, tomorrow, and the future, and we will listen. Together, letâ&euro;&trade;s get this country going!</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> None http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/penning20110303 Mike Penning MP Speech at the Highways Agency Co-operative Systems Industry Day Department for Transport 03 March 2011 2011-03-03 00:00:00 Highways Agency Co-operative Systems Industry Day, Great George Street, Westminster, London.
<p>Many thanks for that introduction and for inviting me to address your national conference. Iâ&euro;&trade;m sorry I couldnâ&euro;&trade;t be with you for your awards ceremony but I want to take this opportunity to congratulate all of the winners. Your bravery awards are always a timely reminder of the debt of gratitude this country owes to the British Transport Police (BTP). Day in, and day out, the BTPâ&euro;&trade;s police officers work tirelessly to protect the travelling public, to make our railways, tubes and trams safe and secure ways to travel, putting your own safety on the line to do this. So, as a Rail Minister <strong>and</strong> a rail passenger, I would like to put my tribute on public record and to thank you for all you do.</p> <p>Every few years it seems that a proposal crops up to subsume you into one or other of the Home Office forces. And I welcome the fact that every time that debate resurfaces, the case is successfully made for retaining a specialist railway police force. With the robust leadership provided by Andy Trotter, Iâ&euro;&trade;m certain youâ&euro;&trade;ll continue to fend off these take-over attempts. I would like to acknowledge the great work Andy is doing as your Chief Constable. In taking over from Sir Ian Johnston, he had a tough act to follow and I believe the BTP has been very lucky in the exceptional calibre of both its current and its previous chief constables. And Iâ&euro;&trade;d also like to praise the work of the British Transport Police Federation and its Chairman, Alex Robertson.</p> <p>You face a host of operational demands, some of which your chairman outlined in his excellent speech kicking off the conference today. At one end of the spectrum vandalism, drunkenness, mobile phone theft and a host of other crimes this country has already witnessed in the murderous 7/7 attacks. At the other, weâ&euro;&trade;ve seen the Mumbai killings illustrate another set of risks that could materialise on our rail network. All of this is a reminder, if it were needed, of the pivotal security and anti-terrorism role of the BTP. The Olympics will bring a new set of exacting challenges and your key role in delivering a successful games, is one I fully recognise.</p> <h2>Public finances</h2> <p>But the work this Federation does, the priorities you campaign on, the issues which matter most to your members, all of these things must be set against the backdrop of the crisis in the public finances and the scale of the deficit the Coalition inherited from our Labour predecessors. This Governmentâ&euro;&trade;s most urgent priority is to tackle that deficit. From our first days in office, through our Emergency Budget to the Spending Review, weâ&euro;&trade;ve been taking the difficult decisions needed to control spending and put the public finances back on the path to recovery. And letâ&euro;&trade;s be clear, painful though some of the spending reductions will be, the consequences of not dealing with the deficit are far worse. Weâ&euro;&trade;d be facing spiralling interest rates and the risk of an Irish style budget crisis and bail out. Left un-tackled the debt we inherited, the largest in British peacetime history, would be costing the country £70 billion a year in interest payments alone by the end of this Parliament. Thatâ&euro;&trade;s more than weâ&euro;&trade;re spending on policing our streets and defending our country. And there are some things that public finance problems have in common, with a credit card bill, the simple truth is the longer you it leave it the worse it gets. The restoration of fiscal discipline is vital if we are to put this country back on its feet again and deliver the economic stability we need for jobs and growth. But we also recognise the crucial importance of modernising our transport infrastructure to make it an engine of economic growth and a gateway to a better quality of life.</p> <p>And thatâ&euro;&trade;s why the Chancellor has placed a priority on transport projects, committing more than £30 billion of capital investment over the next four years, including, pretty much the biggest programme of rail upgrades in modern history.</p> <h2>McNulty and efficiency</h2> <p>But the fact is that the cost of running the railways has escalated dramatically over recent years. If weâ&euro;&trade;re going to continue to deliver improved services and additional capacity that passengers want, the cost of running the railways has to come down. For the sake of both taxpayers and fare payers, itâ&euro;&trade;s imperative that we achieve that goal. So drawing on the work being done by the McNulty Review, weâ&euro;&trade;ll be challenging the rail industry to cut its costs. And Iâ&euro;&trade;m afraid it would be difficult to justify exempting the BTP from those efforts. I very much welcome the efforts you are already making to drive down costs and improve efficiency and I accept that the Olympics is a special case which requires separate consideration but Iâ&euro;&trade;m certain that the BTPA and the rail industry will rightly want to press for savings over the years to come. And given the amount of public money supporting the train operators, Network Rail and the London Underground, the cost of the BTP does have a direct bearing on the public finances, even though your funding structure is different from your Home Office counterparts. Iâ&euro;&trade;m confident that the innovation and dedication your force has always demonstrated will enable you to meet this new challenge successfully and to find ways to deliver top class policing outcomes within a the tighter funding environment which Iâ&euro;&trade;m afraid the crisis in the public finances makes inevitable.</p> <h2>Pay and pensions</h2> <p>In his speech, your chairman touched on the Winsor Review. Of course I fully understand your anxiety about what the outcome might be. This will be the most comprehensive independent review of police pay and conditions in more than 30 years. Working alongside police officers and their representatives, Tom Winsorâ&euro;&trade;s key objective is to ensure that chief constables can deliver the frontline services people want, while securing value for money. And as Tom has made clear, his over-riding principle while conducting this review is fairness - <em>â&euro;&oelig;fairness to police officers and fairness to the taxpayerâ&euro;?</em>. Your Chairman also referred to the Hutton Review and the indirect impact it might potentially have on the BTP pension fund, separate though that is, from the public sector schemes which Lord Hutton is considering. Pensionsâ&euro;&trade; reform is a massive challenge. Successive Governments have put this issue in the â&euro;&tilde;too difficultâ&euro;&trade; box. Well, the state of the public finances means that is no longer a viable option. But we have already made it clear that this is not a race to the bottom. We have decisively rejected this option. Lord Huttonâ&euro;&trade;s remit is to come up with reforms that put public sector pensions on a more sustainable financial footing but do so in a way which is fair both to the workforce and to taxpayers. We want to see public service pensions as a gold standard, once again providing a benchmark for the private sector to aspire towards. Staying with pensions for a moment, in his speech, Alex expressed concern about the costs of the Pension Protection Fund. I understand why this matters to your members. So, officials from my Department have been talking to the PPF on this issue to see if we can find a way to address some of your concerns.</p> <p>And there are a number of other ways in which the Department for Transport is engaged on matters raised with us by the BTP. For example, weâ&euro;&trade;re giving very active consideration to the BTPâ&euro;&trade;s request for an armed unit. I welcome the progress being made on this issue. I know also that you have long argued that the football authorities and football clubs should take more responsibility for the costs they impose on police forces in general and the BTP in particular. Well, there are no simple solutions on that issue but I have taken it up with my colleagues at the Home Office and DCMS to explore whether change might be feasible.</p> <h2>Rising to the challenge</h2> <p>Beyond question these are testing times. But if anyone has what it takes to meet the challenge then itâ&euro;&trade;s the BTP. By way of proof Alex pointed to some very impressive improvements in crime and detection stats from the BTPâ&euro;&trade;s annual performance figures. In fact, over the past six years, crime on Britainâ&euro;&trade;s railways is down a remarkable 25%, while the detection rate has improved by 18 points over the same period. It now stands at its highest level ever. These results speak far more eloquently than I ever could about the courage, commitment and dedication of all those who work for the British Transport Police. For example, your â&euro;&tilde;Safer Stations, Safer Journeysâ&euro;&trade; programme has helped reduce crime through high-visibility patrolling of stations and trains. You have also provided invaluable support to officials in my Department on initiatives like the Secure Stations Scheme which can have a real impact on quality of life for millions of commuters.</p> <p>And I fully recognise the value of the work the BTP is doing to combat cable theft. Metal thieves targeting the railway are causing misery to thousands of passengers and freight users, because of the major disruption they cause. Network Rail anticipates that by the end of 2011, around 500,000 minutes of delay will have been caused by cable theft. I welcome the joint work being done by the BTP, the Home Office and Network Rail to tackle this crime, not least by trying to make it much more difficult for thieves to get cash for stolen metal. But perhaps the aspect of your working practices that I admire the most is the approach you take to getting the railway up and running again as quickly as possible after an incident on the line.</p> <p>The leadership and officers of the BTP demonstrate a real awareness of the damaging economic consequences of prolonged railway shutdowns, not to mention the inconvenience and frustration for passengers. I think there are lessons here for the way we deal with incidents on the road and motorway network. Iâ&euro;&trade;ve repeatedly expressed enthusiasm for spreading best practice from rail to road in this context.</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>So in conclusion, for some two centuries, the men and women who tackle crime on our railways have been at the forefront of policing. Iâ&euro;&trade;m certain that the British Transport Police will continue to play a pivotal role in the success of this countryâ&euro;&trade;s railways. And thatâ&euro;&trade;s because your members and the unique police force in which they serve, are the people who day after day risk their own personal safety in keeping railways safe for others. In so doing, they are, as your Chairman said in his speech, part of the bedrock of democracy. So I thank you once again for what you do to protect the travelling public and I thank you for listening to what Iâ&euro;&trade;ve had to say today.</p> <p><em>(This speech represented existing departmental policy but the words may not have been the same as those used by the Minister.)</em></p> None http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/speeches/villiers20110302 The Rt Hon Theresa Villiers MP British Transport Police Federation Annual Conference Speech Department for Transport 02 March 2011 2011-03-02 00:00:00 British Transport Police Federation Annual Conference, Park Inn Hotel, York
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