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organisation_website date_scraped ends title url starts organisation industrial_sector_classifications value summary principal_investigator further_details research_topic_classifications final_report_summary project_partner department epsrc_reference scheme other_investigators related_grants principal_investicator
2010-05-25 06:16:27 2012-09-30 Academic Fellowships: Zoological Society of London http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E500196/1 2006-10-01 Zoological Soc London Inst of Zoology 375000 1. Food Production and Biodiversity in the Tropics No final report summary is available for this grant. Institute Administration EP/E500196/1 Academic Fellowship None
2010-05-25 06:16:25 2010-09-30 Academic Fellowships Zoological Society of London http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/C509501/1 2004-10-01 Zoological Soc London Inst of Zoology 375000 Emerging infectious diseases in wildlife No final report summary is available for this grant. Institute Administration EP/C509501/1 Academic Fellowship None
http://www.wessex.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:16:20 2010-03-19 Development of the Stress Trajectories Element Method http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E032494/1 2007-03-20 Wessex Institute of Technology Environment 169163 This project is aimed at development of theory and numerical techniques for determination of stresses acting within a solid body (statically determined) caused by applied forces or contacts with other solids. The key innovation of this proposal is the investigation of consistency between constitutive equations (rheology) and stress trajectories. In general, these cannot be given simultaneously and either of them could be used with equations of equilibrium to form a closed system of partial differential equations. We address three essentially different cases when stress trajectories are known (i) everywhere inside the domain; (ii) at discrete points inside the domain; (iii) on the boundary. However in all these cases the stress trajectory concept is used as a unified approach; therefore the method proposed in this application is referred to as the stress trajectories element method, STEM. Continuum Mechanics,Numerical Analysis No final report summary is available for this grant. Damage Mechanics EP/E032494/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:16:16 2010-01-31 Process 2020 Innovation SatNav http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F016905/1 2008-02-01 University of York Chemicals,Food and Drink,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 123447 The key to UK Process Industry success is rapid innovation chain progression from new product identification to delivery and launch. The track record to date is not promising as worldwide the sector as a whole loses over 80bn annually due to poor process design and delay in product deliverables and launch. Traditional project management and concurrent engineering techniques, which focus on integrating and reducing the lead-time for each functional activity, has resulted in no major improvement. The Process Industry is now asking, "how can we help our people make decisions which reduce the new product development lead-time, whilst maximising the overall output in terms of value?" Using a decisional and complex systems perspective, the proposed project will deliver to the UK process industries, a flexible and adaptive innovation "SatNav" that can help technical teams and organisations navigate the complex business and technological terrain. This step change improvement in process and decision making will reduce lead-time and costs, whilst maintaining high levels of creativity and innovation. The project will integrate and support the introduction of new products to the markets, which will be underpinned by a multi-level process improvement strategy. This approach will help the UK process industries to competitively bridge the gap between an idea and reality. It will do this by helping them to follow the most parsimonious and effective path of decisions that the process could take, whilst also ensuring that that path enables innovation, creativity and satisfies business drivers and constraints. Manufacturing Enterprise Operations and Management,Process Systems, Modelling and Design The key to the success of the UK process industries is rapid innovation chain progression, more specifically from new product identification to delivery and launch. The track record within the sector, to date, is not promising, as worldwide loses of over 80bn annually due to poor process design and delay in product deliverables and launch are incurred. Traditional project management and engineering techniques, which focus on integrating and reducing the lead-time for each functional activity, has resulted in no major improvement (Loch & Terwiesch, 1998). The process industry is now asking, "how can we help our people make decisions which reduce the new product development lead-time, whilst maximising the overall output in terms of value?" The York Management School EP/F016905/1 Standard Research EP/F016913/1,EP/F016964/1,EP/F017022/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:16:13 2013-09-30 DTA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P505178/1 2009-10-01 University of York 1291047 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P505178/1 Doctoral Training Grant None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:16:11 2012-09-30 DTA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P504341/1 2008-10-01 University of York 1155356 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P504341/1 Doctoral Training Grant Professor M Babiker,Professor AG Burr,Dr B Keely,Dr IR McIntosh,Professor C Runciman,Professor JPW Young None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:16:08 2011-09-30 DTA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P503485/1 2007-10-01 University of York 1234326 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P503485/1 Doctoral Training Grant Professor M Babiker,Professor AG Burr,Professor G Hall,Dr B Keely,Dr IR McIntosh,Professor C Runciman,Professor JPW Young None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:16:05 2010-09-30 DTA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P502829/1 2006-10-01 University of York 1056985 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P502829/1 Doctoral Training Grant Professor M Babiker,Professor AG Burr,Dr B Keely,Dr IR McIntosh,Professor C Runciman,Professor JPW Young None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:16:02 2014-09-30 DTA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P505798/1 2010-10-01 University of York 1046658 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P505798/1 Doctoral Training Grant None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:59 2012-09-30 DHPA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P504392/1 2008-10-01 University of York 45000 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P504392/1 Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Awards (DHPA) None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:56 2010-09-30 DHPA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P502144/1 2006-10-01 University of York 180000 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P502144/1 Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Awards (DHPA) Mrs S Ritter None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:53 2011-09-30 DHPA - University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/P503272/1 2007-10-01 University of York 135000 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/P503272/1 Dorothy Hodgkin Postgraduate Awards (DHPA) Mrs S Ritter None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:51 2011-09-30 Collaborative Training Account: University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/C537939/1 2005-04-01 University of York 2611076 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/C537939/1 Collaborative Training Account None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:48 2012-09-30 Academic Fellowships: University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E500382/1 2006-10-01 University of York 875000 1. Complex Systems No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/E500382/1 Academic Fellowship None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:45 2010-09-30 Academic Fellowships University Of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/C509390/1 2004-10-01 University of York 250000 Cheminformatics No final report summary is available for this grant. Registrar EP/C509390/1 Academic Fellowship None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:41 2011-10-31 New approaches to banking for the older old http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H042911/1 2010-05-01 University of York Financial Services 168264 At the time of the 2001 census there were 2.4m people aged 80 or more in the UK. Life expectancy at age 80 is now 9 years for men and 11 for women. They have experiences very different from the age cohorts that follow them and many do not use the banking facilities that their children take for granted. Many depend very much more on cash transactions than younger cohorts. Human-Computer Interactions No final report summary is available for this grant. Psychology EP/H042911/1 Standard Research EP/H042997/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:38 2013-09-30 Towards an Atomic-scale Understanding of the 3D Structures of Size-selected Clusters on Surfaces http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G070474/1 2010-04-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 94591 Nanoclusters are finite sized aggregates with dimensions in the nanometer range. An attractive feature of nanoclusters is the possibility of tuning physical properties by size selection. For example, it is now well established that gold becomes a good catalyst in the nanoscale regime, though it is chemically inert in the bulk form. To explore these fundamentally interesting and technologically important size-dependent phenomena, it is crucial that one should gain full knowledge of the atomic structure of these clusters. Surfaces, Surface Probes and Interfaces No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/G070474/1 Standard Research EP/G070326/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:35 2010-07-08 Theory of Explosive Plasma Instabilities http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/D065399/1 2006-10-09 University of York Energy 657561 There are many situations in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas where violent eruptions can occur. Such dramatic events, with very short time-scales, cannot be explained solely in terms of linear theory. This research project will develop a theoretical understanding of the non-linear mechanisms responsible for such explosive growth. The focus will be on two types of instability that are relevant in laboratory tokamak plasmas, which are confined by magnetic fields to achieve the conditions necessary for fusion. These are called the edge-localised mode (ELM) and the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM). Fusion,Plasmas - Laser and Fusion No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/D065399/1 Standard Research Professor S Cowley,Professor S Tobias None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:32 2012-07-31 Support for the UK Car-Parrinello Consortium http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F036884/1 2008-08-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 393767 Many technological advances in modern day life are dependent upon the development of new materials or better control and understanding of existing materials. Understanding the detailed properties of materials has therefore never been more important. The development of high quality computer simulation techniques has played an increasing significant role in this endeavour over recent years. The UK has been at the forefront of this new wave, and the UKCP consortium has played an important part, in both developing computer codes and algorithms, and exploiting these new advances to increase our understanding of many industrially relevant materials and processes. Computational and Theoretical Chemistry,High End Computing,Theoretical Materials Science,Theory and Computational Physics of Condensed Matter No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/F036884/1 Standard Research EP/F036809/1,EP/F037163/2,EP/F03718X/1,EP/F03721X/1,EP/F037325/1,EP/F037457/1,EP/F037481/1,EP/F037783/1,EP/F038038/1,EP/F038356/1,EP/F040105/1,EP/F048084/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:29 2010-03-31 Structural Studies of Strained and Nanostructured Rare Earth Silicides and Germanides Using MEIS and STM. http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E022634/1 2006-10-01 University of York Electronics 368172 As the silicon transistor, which is the digital switch at the heart of the microprocessor, gets smaller and smaller in order to increase switching speeds there are many challenges facing the semiconductor industry which are both technological and fundamental. One area of electronic devices which is increasingly important as devices shrink in size is the junction or interface between metals and semiconductor material. There is a need not only to understand the properties of this metal-semiconductor interface, but to develop new and novel interfaces which will aid this understanding and be of potential benefit in the challenges ahead. New interfaces include those between magnetic materials and semiconductors, which offer a route to controlling the spin of the electron. This is a very active area of research which has the potential for a wide range of new devices, including sensors. The research here is at the fundamental end which underpins these technological developments, it is to determine the structure of a range of metal-semiconductor interfaces and to investigate ways of modifying the structure by exploiting the subtle differences in the spacings between different rare earth silicides (compounds of silicon and lanthanide metals) to generate differing amounts of strain in the growth of materials on the silicide. Other approaches will be to use buffer layers, different growth temperatures (including cooling below room temperature), and different semiconductor substrates with the aim of preventing certain silicide formations or modifying the interface structure. These structural studies will be carried out using the techniques of medium-energy ion scattering (MEIS) at the UK national MEIS facility at Daresbury and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) at York. MEIS uses a beam of ions (usually hydrogen ions) which scatter off the atoms within the material, their scattered energy depends on the mass of the atom that the ions have hit and the number leaving the material in specific directions depends on whether their outgoing path is blocked by atoms in the material. This technique has two key advantages: it can achieve sub-nanometre depth resolution in materials and is sensitive to the atomic species in the material. It is therefore well suited to the study of metals on semiconductors where there is good mass difference between the metal and semiconductor atoms, and where the metal atoms are incorporated into the interface such as in the case of silicide formation. Functional Ceramics and Inorganics: Characterisation,Structural Condensed Matter Physics No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/E022634/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:26 2011-12-25 Simulation of Spin Transport, Diffusion and Injection into Semiconductors http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F016719/1 2008-06-26 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 386251 Public demand for increasingly faster and smaller electronic devices, such as computers, requires that more and even smaller transistors are packed on every chip. This has led to the birth of nanotechnology and, more recently of the nanotechnology field called 'spintronics'. Here not only the charge, but also the spin -- another fundamental property of electrons and holes -- is used to design device functionalities. Among the potential benefits of spintronics devices is the possibility of computers in which the same unit is used for computation and storage, of lower power consumption, of miniaturisation, and more generally the possibility of designing conceptually new devices which mix old functionalities with completely new ones. Magnetic Materials: Characterisation,Theory and Computational Physics of Condensed Matter No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/F016719/1 First Grant Scheme None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:24 2011-11-09 SAMI (Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging): Measuring tokamak plasma current using electron Bernstein wave emission http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H016732/1 2009-11-10 University of York Energy 101090 This research project will apply aperture synthesis, a diagnostic technique used routinely in radio astronomy, to make the first time-resolved measurements of the current density in the tokamak plasma edge. This measurement is crucial for understanding violent eruptions known as ELMs which could be extremely damaging for ITER, the next generation fusion device. At EUR10Bn, ITER is one of the largest international science projects on Earth. Optical Devices and Subsystems,Plasmas - Laser and Fusion No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/H016732/1 First Grant - Revised 2009 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:21 2014-06-30 Nuclear Data: Fission Yields, Decay Heat and Neutron Reaction Cross Sections http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/I003126/1 2010-07-01 University of York Energy 96021 The UK now has little capability in nuclear data measurement and evaluation despite the fact that these data are absolutely critical in underpinning many industrial nuclear applications. The nuclear industry in particular now faces a number of challenges connected with new nuclear build, plutonium disposition, and geological disposal. These areas rely on nuclear data codes which have served the UK well over the years but, due to compensating errors and correcting factors, are likely to depart from observation as the envelope of operation is extended into the new areas of application. Energy - Nuclear No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/I003126/1 Standard Research EP/I003258/1,EP/I00324X/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:18 2011-09-30 Next generation application of EUV lasers http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F01953X/1 2007-10-01 University of York Aerospace, Defence and Marine 127292 Accurate quantitative opacities relevant to the boundary between the convection and radiative zone of the Sun and other similar plasmas using a novel EUV laser probing technique will be made. To produce quantitative opacity measurements that can be used to improve the precision of the Rosseland mean opacity employed in the Standard Solar Model, we need to implement advances in experimental technique and increase the plasma density and temperature uniformity and range of measurement alongside a major modelling and simulation effort on plasma opacity. The positions of spectral lines and their oscillator strengths are tabulated by databases such as the Opacity Project. Our measurements will enable comparisons between theory and experiment to check the systematic absolute accuracy of the spectral line wavelengths (to within +/- 0.02 nm) and the accuracy of spectral line broadening models at high density (again to within +/- 0.02 nm). The measurement of laser ablation using EUV laser probing under different ablation regimes including with x-ray heating will be explored and the production of plasmas directly by focussed EUV irradiation will be investigated. Plasmas - Laser and Fusion No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/F01953X/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:15 2011-03-31 Laboratory measurements of the opacity of solar plasmas http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F019289/1 2007-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 865909 Accurate quantitative opacities relevant to the boundary between the convection and radiative zone of the Sun and other similar plasmas will be made using a novel EUV laser probing technique. To produce quantitative opacity measurements that can be used to improve the precision of the Rosseland mean opacity employed in the Standard Solar Model, we need to implement advances in experimental technique and increase the plasma density and temperature uniformity and range of measurement alongside a major modelling and simulation effort on plasma opacity. The positions of spectral lines and their oscillator strengths are tabulated by databases such as the Opacity Project. Our measurements will enable comparisons between theory and experiment to check the systematic absolute accuracy of the spectral line wavelengths (to within +/- 0.02 nm) and the accuracy of spectral line broadening models at high density (again to within +/- 0.02 nm). The measurement of laser ablation using EUV laser probing under different ablation regimes including with x-ray heating will be explored and the production of plasmas directly by focussed EUV irradiation will be investigated. Plasmas - Laser and Fusion No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/F019289/1 Standard Research Professor GJ Pert,Dr MIJ Probert None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:13 2011-09-30 Fusion Doctoral Training Network http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H012605/1 2009-10-01 University of York Energy 201925 Fusion energy is likely to become a major contributor to world electricity generation capacity. The extent to which this will occur will become clear over the next 10-15 years with the construction and operation of ITER (the second largest international science project after the International Space Station). In parallel, the HiPER proposal, for example, will explore the potential for inertial confinement fusion. In this timescale the UK must develop a cadre of trained personnel who have the ability to contribute to the decisions the UK will have to make and, if the decision is to take this route, to train the generation of scientists and engineers who will license and build fusion power plants in the UK. In the nearer term, JET (sited at Culham) is undergoing a ~100M upgrade programme and there are also advanced plans for the UK's domestic tokamak, MAST, to be significantly upgraded. With inertial fusion, the Orion laser facility is just coming on line at AWE Aldermaston. These offer exciting opportunities for young scientists: a fact reflected by the high popularity of fusion amongst students. For the UK to maximise the benefits from these facilities and be in a position to contribute to and exploit the spin-offs of fusion science and technology, it is essential that there is a coordinated training programme to provide a critical mass of manpower, the quality of which is recognised internationally. There is no such programme in the UK at present and the core aim of this proposal is to take the first steps towards addressing this need. Specifically it will establish some of the infrastructure and the collaborative network to prepare the way for a full Doctoral Training Centre in the future. Fusion,Plasmas - Laser and Fusion No final report summary is available for this grant. Physics EP/H012605/1 Centre for Doctoral Training Professor JW Bradley,Dr K Gibson,Dr P Howarth,Professor RM Sharples,Professor G Tallents None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:09 2011-03-14 Research Workshop on Mathematical Virology http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H048979/1 2010-03-15 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 23970 Viruses pose a significant threat for the public health sector and new efficient anti-viral treatments are urgently required. Insights in the structures of viruses and the mechanism underlying their formation provide the basis for the development of such therapeutics. Most viruses package their genomic material in a protein container that acts as a Trojan horse, providing protection and transport for the viral genome between hosts. These protein containers are known to be well ordered, and can therefore be understood in terms of the mathematical language of symmetry. In this workshop we explore the mathematical tools necessary to understand the structures of viruses, and then exploit these results to gain insights in how viruses form and how they infect their hosts. An understanding of how these processes depend on the geometries of the protein containers potentially permits the development of novel strategies for inhibiting these processes. These in turn have the potential to result in the development of anti-viral drugs targeted at such stages of the viral life cycle. Algebra and Geometry,Mathematical Physics,Non-linear Systems Mathematics No final report summary is available for this grant. Mathematics EP/H048979/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:07 2012-09-30 Nonultralocality and new mathematical structures in quantum integrability http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H000054/1 2009-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 352347 The crucial natural question to ask of a problem in mathematical physics is whether we can solve it. Since most such problems are couched in the language of differential equations, the question is therefore of whether we can integrate the equations, of whether the problem is 'integrable'. The generalized mathematics of integrability is that of the structures which make some problems solvable in a way that others are not. Perhaps surprisingly, it turns out that fundamental physics makes much use of integrable models. The mathematical analysis of the central issue in modern fundamental physics, the relationship between the gauge theories of particle physics and the much more speculative string theory (the 'gauge/string correspondence'), has proved to be full of integrable models in recent years - but whereas conventional integrability refers to time-evolution, the crucial integrability in gauge theory is with the evolution of the energy scale. Mathematical Physics No final report summary is available for this grant. Mathematics EP/H000054/1 Standard Research Dr E Sklyanin None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:03 2011-02-14 Inhomogenous approximation on manifolds and more general structures. http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E061613/1 2008-02-15 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 279592 Diophantine approximation is an area of number theory that originated with the question of how `rapidly' a real number can be approximated by rational numbers. The `speed' or `error' of approximation is measured in terms of the size of the denominator of the rational approximate. This line of questioning dates back to the ancient Greeks and Chinese who used good rational approximates to the number pi (3.14159...) in order accurately to predict the position of planets and stars. Equivalently, Diophantine approximation is a quantitative analysis of the fact that any real number is arbitrarily close to rational numbers; i.e. the rationals are dense in the real line. Algebra and Geometry No final report summary is available for this grant. Mathematics EP/E061613/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:15:01 2010-09-30 Geometrical, dynamical and transference principles in non-linear Diophantine approximation and applications http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/C54076X/1 2005-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 271970 The research is mainly devoted to Diophantine approximation, a branch of Number Theory, which can be described as a more quantitative and general analysis of the property that any real number is arbitrarily close to rational numbers. The metrical theory of Diophantine approximation specializes on the study of typical Diophantine properties of numbers. It is also related to more traditional non-metrical problems in Number theory. Algebra and Geometry No final report summary is available for this grant. Mathematics EP/C54076X/1 Advanced Fellowship None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:57 2011-03-23 Classical metric Diophantine approximation revisited http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F027028/1 2008-03-24 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 228108 Diophantine approximation is a branch of number theory that can loosely be described as a quantitative analysis of the property that every real number can be approximated by a rational number arbitrarily closely. The theory dates back to the ancient Greeks and Chinese who used good rational approximations to the number pi (3.14159...) in order to accurately predict the position of planets and stars. Algebra and Geometry No final report summary is available for this grant. Mathematics EP/F027028/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:54 2011-03-31 Software-controlled assembly of oligomers http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F008279/1 2007-12-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 10760 We propose to create a molecular machine that will build new materials under software control. The output of the machine will be chains of building blocks linked by covalent bonds. The machine is modular and is designed to accept many different building blocks, from small molecules to nanoparticles, with a wide range of physical and chemical properties. In order to drive its development we will concentrate on using it to create two target products: a molecular wire, capable of transporting energy and electrical charge, and a catalyst. Software control starts with specification by the end-user of a sequence of building blocks. The target sequence is encoded in an instruction tape which can be read by the machine: the tape is itself a molecule, a synthetic DNA oligomer. The target sequence of building blocks is automatically converted into a control sequence of DNA bases, and the tape is produced by commercial solid-phase synthesis. The job of the machine is to read the instruction tape and to form the bonds between building blocks in the specified sequence. Every component of this molecular factory is itself a molecule: our ambition is to develop the system to the point where it could be distributed to end users as chemicals in plastic vials. Chemical Synthetic Methodology,Functional Organics and Polymers: Synthesis and Growth No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/F008279/1 Standard Research EP/F008597/1,EP/F00740X/1,EP/F009062/2,EP/F009186/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:51 2010-06-03 Signal Generator for Antennas Research http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E056571/1 2007-06-04 University of York Communications 23539 The purpose of the proposal is to fund the purchase of a signal generator to support an ongoing, experimental programme of research in antennas and related microwave systems at the Department of Electronics at the University of York. This piece of equipment is needed to facilitate measurements over a wide range of microwave frequencies (to 40 GHz), and to replace an ancient signal generator currently used in the range 26 - 32 GHz. The main research activities which would be supported include a current project investigating multi-beam and scanning lens antennas (with Avanti Communications Ltd and funded through British National Space Centre), and a current project funded privately by the Swiss 'StratXX' consortium developing a stratospheric deployment of wireless networks. Further spin-off benefits include support to student projects (MSc., MEng.) where these entail an experimental, laboratory-based component. Radio Frequency (RF) and Microwave Technology No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/E056571/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:48 2011-09-30 Self-healing Cellular Architectures for Biologically-inspired Highly Reliable Electronic Systems http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F062192/1 2008-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 393001 Powerful and sophisticated systems, from computers, through control systems, to 'conventional' household appliances have become a necessity in our modern way of life. In the modern world of digital electronics - virtually all of which is now built using VLSI technology - we are quite accustomed to the idea that hundreds of thousands, often millions, of individual components on a chip must work faultlessly over extended periods of time. Yet, it commonly requires only a single transistor to fail to have catastrophic consequences for the entire system. Bioelectronic Devices No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/F062192/1 Standard Research Dr G Tempesti,Professor J Timmis EP/F067623/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:45 2012-03-08 Probing spin torque and domain wall scattering with XPEEM and transport measurements http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G010064/1 2009-03-09 University of York Electronics 89813 The 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics celebrated the discovery of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) in magnetic multilayers in 1988, which lead to an exciting new area of spintronics. The GMR heads have increased the magnetic data storage density by more than 20 times. Spintronics is also expected to have a major impact on microelectronics, automotive sensors, communication and quantum computing in a way comparable to the development of the transistor 50 years ago. The DTI has stated that, 'by 2015 spintronics technology will be the only way to make electronic devices smaller and more efficient /by then, existing semiconductors and semiconductor materials, like silicon, will have exhausted their capability for miniaturization.' [DTI Global Watch magazine, July /August 2005]. There are, however, several drawbacks associated with the conventional approach of switching a magnet using external magnetic fields, and the most important being cross-talk and high power consumption. This has generated a growing interest in the use of spin-polarised current rather than the external magnetic fields to switch the spintronic devices - another major discovery in spintronics after the GMR effect. The current-induced magnetization switching, well known as spin-torque effects, can locally switch a magnetic element to avoid cross-talk and reduce the power consumption. Due to the spin and momentum transfer, the spin-polarised current can move away a domain wall trapped in a magnetic nanocontact, or switch the magnetic sub-layer in a GMR-type nanopillar structure. Over the last few years, there are several Nature and Science papers reporting the discovery of this effect and its great potentials, and during the 52nd Annual Conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials last November in Tampa, Florida, there were around 150 invited and contributed presentations on spin-torque effect and its applications. There are, however, many fundamental and challenging issues including the mechanism of the critical current and the contribution of momentum transfer and spin-transfer, the effect of the orbital moment, and role of the spin-orbital coupling on the spin dependent scattering and these issues can not fully addressed with a single experimental technique. In this project, we propose to study the magnetic nanocontact by exploring both Synchrotron Radiation and laboratory based measurement techniques. York spintronics team is well positioned to carry out this work with their internationally leading expertises in both magnetic nanocontact and Synchrotron Radiation techniques. The York's Spintronics group had been a regular user of the SRS Daresbury Laboratory with joint PhD students. The university have recently invested about 5M in establishing the York Center of Nanofabrication and Analysis with the state-of-the-art facilities for nanofabrication. In this project, by taking advantages of the newly established Diamond NanoScience beamline I06, we will probe the spin torque and domain wall scattering using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM). Being non-intrusive and providing direct imaging of the magnetization orientations, the XPEEM technique has several advantages over the conventional magnetic force microscope. More importantly, the XPEEM technique is capable of probing both the spin configuration and spin and orbital moments in magnetic nanocontacts and will provide unique information to understand the mechanisms of spin-torque effect and domain wall scattering, both depending on the spin-orbital exchange coupling. By combining with the transport measurements in York, this project will thus explore experimentally for the first time the correlation between the orbital moments, the critical current and the domain wall magneto-resistance, which will have a major impact on the understanding of the fascinating physics of the spin-torque effect and magnetic nanocontacts. Magnetic Materials: Characterisation No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/G010064/1 Standard Research Dr A Hirohata None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:43 2011-07-31 Molecular Software and Hardware for Programmed Chemical Synthesis http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F055951/1 2008-08-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 170325 We intend to design a nanoscale chemical factory in which the machines, like the products, are molecules. The factory will not only build molecules but will be capable of evolving them to have desirable properties. The products will be linear molecules produced by linking together smaller building blocks in a defined sequence - at each stage the molecular machinery will be capable of choosing the correct building block from a range of possibilities. The system will be capable of synthesizing a library of molecules with different sequences and selecting 'successful' molecules for their fitness to perform a specified task. We will also develop designs for more powerful systems in which the molecular machinery responsible for chemical synthesis has internal computing power and can direct its own operation. Chemical Synthetic Methodology,Functional Organics and Polymers: Synthesis and Growth No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/F055951/1 Standard Research EP/F056605/1,EP/F055803/1,EP/F056826/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:40 2010-09-30 Meeting the design challenges of the nano-CMOS electronics http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E001610/1 2006-10-01 University of York Electronics 281357 See Joint Proposal E241901 Electronic Devices and Subsystems,Information and Knowledge Management,Systems on a Chip No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/E001610/1 Standard Research EP/E003125/1,EP/E001947/1,EP/E002005/1,EP/E002064/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:37 2010-12-31 Low-Complexity Adaptive Beamforming Algorithms Based on Low-Rank Decompositions and Set-Membership Filtering http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H011544/1 2010-01-01 University of York Aerospace, Defence and Marine 83844 The goal of the proposed research is to develop novel low-complexity beamforming algorithms based on low-rank decompositions and the set-membership filtering (SMF) framework in order to address challenge #15. We will introduce concepts of low-rank decomposition based on iterative switching and pattern matching, and approximation of basis functions to the design of the matrix S_D. We will formulate the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer with these decompositions. Specifically, the goal is to devise algorithms with an order of magnitude lower complexity than existing algorithms. We will develop low-rank stochastic gradient (SG) and recursive least squares (RLS) algorithms ten times less complex than the existing full-rank SG and RLS ones, which have at least comparable performance. This will be possible due to the combination of innovative low-rank decompositions with SMF-based algorithms. The proposed low-rank decompositions do not require complex eigen-decompositions or expensive operations. These techniques can be significantly simpler than full-rank filtering algorithms by reducing the dimensionality from M to D. For instance, for the scenario of interest we will have M=64 array elements and a rank 3=D=6. The SMF concept will then be used to design low-complexity adaptive algorithms for the updates of the matrix S_D and the filter w_D. One key aspect of the proposed low-rank SMF-based algorithms is to exploit data-selective updates with possibly different update ratios for the matrix S_D and the filter w_D. We will formulate the LCMV beamforming problem with the low-rank decompositions using linear algebra, develop SMF-based adaptive algorithms and build simulation tools to design, test and analyse the proposed techniques. The outcomes will be better, simpler and practical beamforming algorithms, and high-quality publications. Digital Signal Processing No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/H011544/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:34 2013-01-03 Low complexity delay-tolerant space-time block coding http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H016899/1 2010-01-04 University of York Communications 115255 Future wireless systems are expected to involve a plethora of small, low-cost communication nodes which will be widely distributed in the infrastructure of cities to provide truly pervasive and seamless communication and other services such as sensor networks. Perhaps the most fundamental challenge in these systems as in all wireless communications is channel fading. In these pervasive wireless systems, however, the individual nodes may be equipped with only a single antenna due to cost and size constraints. Digital Signal Processing,Radio Frequency (RF) and Microwave Technology No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/H016899/1 Standard Research EP/H016945/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:32 2011-10-31 IDEAS Factory - Detecting Terrorist Activities: Bigger ears: Remote speech surveillance on the move at a distance http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H023062/1 2009-11-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 408452 This research will look at the effects of walking on the movement of clothing in terms of how the fibres move relative to each other and what effect this has on the clothing in general. The different ways in which people move will be considered because we all move differently. The results will enable a detailed investigation of how different fabrics are affected by the various degrees of movement that are exhibited when people wearing clothes made out of them move around. Fibre fatigue and creasing will be considered in relation to the looks and practical feel of garments made out of the various fabrics. Acoustics,Digital Signal Processing,Structural Polymers: Characterisation No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/H023062/1 Standard Research Mr B Dalton,Mr C Rowland None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:29 2012-03-31 Efficient spin voltage/current generation in a ferromagnet/semiconductor lateral spin-valve http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G051631/1 2009-04-01 University of York Electronics 93262 A spin-polarised electron current has been widely investigated to realise new spintronic device application. For example, spin-transfer torque induced by a spin-polarised electron current offers a fundamental physical mechanism on current-induced magnetisation switching (CIMS) as well as domain-wall motion in a ferromagnetic (FM) nanowire. The spin-transfer torque was predicted by Berger and Slonczewski independently, and has been experimentally demonstrated. By spin-scattering layer insertion and shape modification for a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) nanopillar, a critical current density for switching has been reduced to satisfy a Gbit-scale requirement for a magnetic random access memory (MRAM), a 4-Mbit version of which has been introduced by Freescale (now EverSpin Technologies) in 2006. MRAM is expected to replace a Si-based RAM due to the non-volatility and the better thermal stability. Recently, coherent tunnelling in an Fe/MgO/Fe system has been predicted to achieve over 1000% tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) and experimentally observed in epitaxial/highly-oriented Fe(Co)/MgO/Fe(Co) junctions. Such coherent tunnelling has been implemented into a nano-pillar to demonstrate the CIMS with 160% TMR ratio at room temperature. By combining the large TMR ratio with the substantial decrease in critical current density down to 2.5x10^6 A/cm2, the requirement for beyond the Gbit-scale MRAM application is satisfied. Hence, government-initiatives have been applied to develop a commercial Gbit MRAM both in the USA and Japan. Superconductors: Characterisation No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/G051631/1 Standard Research Professor K O'Grady None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:26 2010-07-31 Development and commercialisation of a novel parallel magnetic analyser for surface studies http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H00825X/1 2009-08-01 University of York Electronics 113996 This project aims to bring to commercialisation a new electron energy analyser that can acquire full spectra of the surfaces of investigated samples. The unique feature of this invention is that data acquisition will be carried out in parallel and over a wide angular range. This offers an improvement on current technology approaching two orders of magnitude in terms of speed of data acquisition. In addition, the new invention favourably compares with present technology on cost and suitability to sample environment as found in conventional electron mcroscopes. The principal market for the new analyser is in defect review in semiconductor manufacturing but other areas across nanotechnology where elemental analysis of small dimensions is required will also benefit from this development. This is because as semiconductor device sizes become ever smaller, so do the size of undesired particles that can prevent the operation of the manufactured product. In order to assist in detecting the presence of small particles and to gain an understanding as to what causes their presence during the manufacturing process, it is vital to be able to determine the chemical composition of those particles. Current methods of carrying out this task are incapable of coping with the nanometre size of particles that cause major problems today when such a process is carried out in a conventional electron microscope. The investigators of this proposal intend to further optimise the present invention to suit demonstration to potential scientific instrument manufacturers who could be interested in licensing this technology . The investigators have identified a list of such world-leading manufacturers who will be visited and presented with representative results from the current set-up and those interested in further discussion leading to licensing of the technology will be invited to York for a demonstration. Finally, the investigators will work closely with a leading British electron microscope manufacturer to adapt the new invention on one of their SEMs. Obducat Camscan will make available one of their latest microscope models, the Apollo 300, to demonstrate the new invention. Analytical Science,Processing Of Electronic Components,Surfaces, Surface Probes and Interfaces No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/H00825X/1 Follow on Fund None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:23 2012-12-31 Demonstration of high-frequency oscillation in a Co-based Heusler alloy tunnel junction http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H026126/1 2010-01-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 73084 Keywords: Magnetic Materials: Characterisation,Magnetic Materials: Synthesis and Growth No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/H026126/1 Standard Research Professor K O'Grady None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:20 2010-07-31 Automatic Design of Adaptive Systems using Unconstrained Evolution and Development on the POEtic Platform http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E028381/1 2007-07-01 University of York Electronics 333131 It is unclear how certain future, and probably current, systems can be robustly designed using traditional techniques. For example, the lost "Beagle 2" Mars probe illustrated that it is still very difficult to design systems able to cope with unforeseen circumstances. Development is nature's answer to this "complexity crisis" and is therefore an important and potentially useful avenue of study. In addition, if we are to deal with systems operating in complex dynamical environments, where the environment has significant effects on the operation and structure of the system, development appears the only realistic way forward. Bioelectronic Devices,Cell Biology,Developmental Biology and Physiology,New and Emerging Computer Paradigms No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/E028381/1 Standard Research Dr JF Miller None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:18 2013-08-31 Artificial Biochemical Networks: Computational Models and Architectures http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F060041/1 2008-09-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 631292 Previous work by ourselves and others has shown how the structure and organisation of biological organisms can motivate the design of computer hardware and software, with the aim of capturing useful properties such as complex information processing and resistance to environmental perturbation. This proposal focuses upon one of the most complex sets of structures found in biological systems: biochemical networks. These structures are fundamental to the development, function and evolution of biological organisms, and are the main factor underlying the complexity seen within higher organisms. Previous attempts to build hardware and software systems motivated by these structures has led to a group of computer architectures which we collectively refer to as artificial biochemical network models. The best known of these is the artificial genetic network, which has shown itself to be an effective means of expressing complex computational behaviours, particularly within robotic control. Nevertheless, this field of research has received relatively little attention, and little is known about the computational properties of these architectures. The aim of the proposed work is to develop better artificial biochemical network models, which we will do by both bringing together existing work and introducing new understanding from the biological sciences. We will also develop a theoretical framework to better understand what these computational architectures are capable of, and show how how these models can be applied to the difficult problem of controlling a robot in real world environments. It is expected that this work will also produce insights into the function and evolution of the biological systems on which the architectures are modelled. New and Emerging Computer Paradigms No final report summary is available for this grant. Electronics EP/F060041/1 Standard Research Dr LSD Caves,Professor S Stepney None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:14 2011-09-30 Using Learning to Support the Development of Embedded Systems http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F00334X/1 2007-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 379941 Reasoning about the timing properties of many modern systems is crucial. Examples include anti-lock braking systems, air traffic control systems, and even medical applications such as X-ray dosage delivery equipment. Reasoning about response times of such systems has been the subject of much research. In particular, a great deal of scheduling theory has been developed to provide bounds on worst-case response times. Such work assumes the timing properties of individual components in the system are well understood. In particular, the Worst Case Execution Time (WCET) for an individual task is an input to all forms of real-time scheduling theory. The derivation of such WCETs therefore underpins our efforts to guarantee response times in critical systems. The real-time systems community recognizes this as a major challenge. Artificial Intelligence Technologies,Fundamentals of Computing,Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/F00334X/1 Standard Research Professor JA Clark,Dr D Kazakov None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:11 2010-03-31 The Reduceron: high level symbolic computing on FPGA http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G011052/1 2008-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 100364 Symbolic computing is a key technology with programs often written in very expressive high level languages. The Reduceron is a custom processor for executing such symbolic programs by a technique called graph reduction. It is built on an FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array), a medium that allows rapid exploration of alternative designs. The current prototype was developed in just 2--3 months as a case-study in the closing stages of a PhD. Early results are sufficiently promising that we propose a 15-month feasibility study researching the potential of a special-purpose processor based on an advanced Reduceron. Results will be immediately applicable in FPGA-based systems and could inform the future design of a SPU (Symbolic Processing Unit) analogous to current highly successful GPUs for graphics. Fundamentals of Computing,Systems Methodology and Architecture,Systems on a Chip No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/G011052/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:09 2013-09-30 The Birth, Life and Death of Semantic Mutants http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G043604/1 2009-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 136252 Traditional Mutation Testing produces test cases that distinguish between some description N and variants of it. Each variant is produced by applying a mutation operator to N. A test set that is good at distinguishing N from variants of N is likely to be good at finding faults that are similar to applications of the mutation operators. Mutation testing was originally applied to programs but more recently it has been applied to other forms of descriptions such as specifications. Mutants are produced through the application of mutation operators, each of which may be applied to a relevant point in a program in order to produce a mutant. The mutation operators carry out small syntactic changes. For example, + might be replaced by -, > might be replaced by >=, a variable in an expression may be replaced by a constant, or part of an expression may be deleted. The mutation operators are designed to represent syntactically small errors. Typically, mutants are used to either judge the adequacy of a test set (does it distinguish between N and its mutants?) and also to drive test generation (we want a test set that distinguishes between N and its mutants). Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/G043604/1 Standard Research Dr M Y A Oriol EP/G04354X/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:06 2012-09-30 TEMPO: Time Driven Modelling and Resource Management of Real-Time Systems on Multiprocessor Systems-on-Chip http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G055548/1 2009-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 622511 Embedded real-time systems (ERTS) implemented on Multiprocessor System-on-Chip (MPSoC) platforms present fundamental challenges to the offline modeling of system behaviour, offline prediction of system temporal and resource usage at run-time, and run-time resource management. MPSoC platforms offer the prospect of immense computational power via parallelism, but this very parallelism makes them difficult to model. Hence from a real-time systems perspective, it is extremely difficult to predict offline the run-time behaviour and performance of ERTS implemented upon MPSoC platforms. We note that such predictions are a fundamental requirement of real-time systems. Modelling and Simulation of IT Systems,Systems Methodology and Architecture No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/G055548/1 Standard Research Professor A Burns None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:14:03 2010-07-27 System-Smart Intrusion Detection http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E028128/1 2007-09-28 University of York Communications 228258 Criminal use of the national network infrastructure is commonplace: blackmail, and phishing (social engineering) alone are significant in economic terms. These activities exploit network hosts that have been previously subverted, by attacks that are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Existing Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) are unable to detect new or subtle attacks, and deploying IDS sensors in higher volumes results in high report volumes, but little more effectiveness. This project will show that by taking a system design approach to the choice and configuration of sensors, together with network deployment strategies that allow flexible sensor placement, it is possible to substantially improve the detection of subtle attacks. This work does not focus on improvements to individual intrusion detection components; but rather exploits the synergy that can be obtained by combining the strengths of different types of sensor, in a holistic approach to intrusion management design. ICT Networks and Distributed Systems No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/E028128/1 Standard Research EP/E028268/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:59 2012-03-31 Systems Development: Domain-Specific Modelling http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G061947/1 2009-04-01 University of York Information Technologies 274762 Traditionally, engineers use their experience in a problem domain and their knowledge of science and mathematics to find suitable solutions to a problem. They develop candidate solutions by building appropriate mathematical models, which they then analyse and test, using tools wherever possible. In the same way, system engineering is becoming ever-more dependent on modelling and a range of different tools and techniques are being used. These models are used to solve the problem in terms familiar to the domain expert, but in doing so they leave a wide gap between the domain model and the implementation technology. In this context, the project will address three challenges: Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/G061947/1 Standard Research Professor R Paige None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:56 2011-12-27 SEBASE: Software Engineering By Automated SEarch http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/D050618/1 2006-06-28 University of York Information Technologies,Transport Systems and Vehicles 784417 Current software engineering practice is a human-led search for solutions which meet needs and constraints under limited resources. Often there will be conflict, both between and within functional and non-functional criteria. Naturally, like other engineers, we search for a near optimal solution. As systems get bigger, more distributed, more dynamic and more critical, this labour-intensive search will hit fundamental limits. We will not be able to continue to develop, operate and maintain systems in the traditional way, without automating or partly automating the search for near optimal solutions. Artificial Intelligence Technologies,Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/D050618/1 Standard Research Dr I Bate,Mr SM Poulding EP/D050863/1,EP/D052785/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:53 2010-09-30 Refinement Patterns for Contractual Statecharts http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E034853/1 2007-07-01 University of York Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Information Technologies 398273 Increasingly, aerospace systems such as airplane engines have a substantial computer software component. Building such software is challenging, because the software must interact with mechanical devices , like sensors on an airplane wing, and with computer hardware. Moreover, this software must be reliable, robust, and above all, safe, i.e., it must be certified as acceptably safe for use. In building such software, engineers typically rely on ad-hoc design methods for control systems. These methods usually start with an abstract description of a proposed solution, expressed in several different styles: operational (describing steps to be taken) and declarative (describing properties that the software should possess). These descriptions are then step-by-step refined into executable programs. Fundamentals of Computing,Process Systems, Modelling and Design,Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/E034853/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:50 2011-04-30 Quantum Computation: Foundations, Security, Cryptography and Group Theory http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F005881/1 2008-05-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 287046 Quantum computation is based on computers which operate on the level of quantum mechanics rather than classical electronics. The advantage of this is that in quantum mechanics entities can be simultaneously in many different positions at once: and this allows states of a quantum computer to behave in some ways like a stack of parallel states. This parallel stack does not unfortunately come without strings and, because of the physics of quantum mechanics, it is very difficult to find out what is in any such stack at a particular time: so reading the output of a quantum computer is not easy. Some powerful quantum algorithms have been developed: for example by Shor to factor integers much faster than conventional algorithms can. However the number of such algorithms that we know is not growing very rapidly. One reason for this is that we do not have a systematic understanding of how to build up quantum computing algorithms and indeed do not have a comprehensive library of algorithms for very basic functions and procedures for building from them. The main aims of this project are to construct such a systematic foundation for quantum computation and to establish procedures for basic processes. Algebra and Geometry,Fundamentals of Computing,New and Emerging Computer Paradigms No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/F005881/1 Standard Research EP/F014945/1,EP/F020813/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:47 2011-09-30 Programming from Control Laws http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E025366/1 2007-07-01 University of York Information Technologies 318472 The use of computers and computer programs is pervasive nowadays, but every computer user knows that programs go wrong. While it is just annoying when our favourite text editor looses a bit of our work, the consequences are potentially much more serious when a computer program which, for instance, controls parts of an airplane goes wrong. To develop this sort of application, the UK government has produced guidelines which require the use of special techniques. Anybody can develop and sell a text editor, but programs whose failure can endanger lives need to be certified by the proper authorities. Control Systems Engineering, Integration and Autonomy,Fundamentals of Computing,Software Engineering,Systems Methodology and Architecture No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/E025366/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:44 2011-12-01 PLAZZMID: Evolutionary algorithms from bacterial and bee genomes http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F031033/1 2008-06-02 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 806662 Classical evolutionary algorithms have been extremely successful at solving certain problems. But they implement a very simple model of evolutionary biology that misses out several aspects that might be exploited by more sophisticated algorithms. We have previously critiqued the traditional naive approach to bio-inspired algorithm design, that moves straight from a simplistic description of the biology into some algorithm. Genomic and Post Genomic Science and Technologies,New and Emerging Computer Paradigms,Population Biology and Biodiversity,Quantitative Predictive Biology No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/F031033/1 Standard Research Mr T Clarke,Professor JPW Young None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:42 2011-01-31 Interdisciplinary Design and Evaluation of Dependability (INDEED) http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E001580/1 2007-02-01 University of York Information Technologies,Transport Systems and Vehicles 388072 Computers increasingly play vital roles in organisations - e.g., hospitals or factories - which thus become "computer-based systems". The dependability of these systems is a major societal concern. In response, EPSRC funded the Dependability Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (DIRC) between City, Edinburgh, Lancaster, Newcastle and York universities. DIRC was based on the premise that dependability must be studied not as a purely technical issue, but as a socio-technical property of the combination of a computing system with the environments in which it is procured, developed and used. DIRC thus assembled a world class interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, psychologists, sociologists and statisticians, which has achieved substantial results through a rare degree of collaboration between engineering and social sciences. Fundamentals of Computing,Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/E001580/1 Standard Research Professor JCP Woodcock EP/E000517/1,EP/E000320/1,EP/E001297/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:38 2015-03-31 High-integrity Java Applications using Circus http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H017461/1 2010-04-01 University of York Information Technologies 1029474 The use of computers and computer programs is pervasive nowadays, but every computer user knows that programs go wrong. While it is just annoying when our favourite text editor loses a bit of our work, the consequences are potentially much more serious when a computer program that, for instance, controls parts of an airplane goes wrong. Software validation and verification are central to the development of this sort of application. In fact, the software industry in general spends a very large amount of money in these activities. Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/H017461/1 Standard Research Professor A Wellings,Professor JCP Woodcock None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:34 2015-09-30 EngD in Large-Scale Complex IT Systems http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F501374/1 2008-04-01 University of York Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Communications,Financial Services,Information Technologies 4099287 The proposed EngD will be the major training activity of the LSCITS Initiative, whose research component is already funded by EPSRC. This Initiative was prompted by various reports by the Royal Academy of Engineering and others, which established an industrial need for specialist education in LSCITS. The specific EngD themes are those that were indentified by the Initiative as the " LSCITS Stack" that also guides the Initiative reserach programme, and spans from Mathematical Foundations,via Predicatable Software Systems, High-integrity Software Engineering, to Compexity in Organisations ICT Networks and Distributed Systems,Modelling and Simulation of IT Systems,Software Engineering,Systems Integration No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/F501374/1 Engineering Doctorate Dr G Luettgen None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:31 2010-01-31 Defending the Weakest Link: Intrusion via Social Engineering http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/D051819/1 2006-08-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 189277 Fraud has been with us since time immemorial. With the rise of cyberspace opportunities for fraud abound. Recent years has seen a dramatic increase in what have become known as 'phishing' attacks. The most obvious means is via email. ICT Networks and Distributed Systems,Software Engineering No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/D051819/1 Standard Research Dr R Banse,Dr J L Jacob None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:28 2012-03-31 CoSMoS: Complex Systems Modelling and Simulation http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E053505/1 2007-10-01 University of York Electronics 740251 Our proposal builds capacity in generic modelling tools and simulation techniques for complex systems, to support the modelling, analysis and prediction of complex systems, and to help design and validate complex systems. Drawing on our state-of-the-art expertise in many aspects of computer systems engineering, we will develop CoSMoS, a modelling and simulation process and infrastructure specifically designed to allow complex systems to be explored, analysed, and designed within a uniform framework. Complexity Science,Fundamentals of Computing,New and Emerging Computer Paradigms No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/E053505/1 Standard Research Dr MA Bates,Dr F Polack,Professor J Timmis,Professor A Tyrrell EP/E049419/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:26 2012-02-03 Combining Model- and Irradiance-based Constraints for Improved Face Shape Recovery and Recognition From Single Images http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F036949/1 2008-08-04 University of York Creative Industries 127310 The problem of estimating 3-dimensional face shape from single images has attracted considerable attention in recent years. One of the reasons for this is that 3D shape information provides a pose and illumination invariant description of a face, which can either be used for recognition directly, or to produce illumination and pose normalised images for input to a 2D recognition system. Recent work which has performed recognition using 3D face shape information acquired through non-standard sensing modalities has demonstrated the potential benefits of 3D over 2D intensity images. The most important of these are improved robustness to changes in pose, illumination and expression. However, the benefits of using the face over other biometrics are lost in these systems since they require the participation and knowledge of a subject. On the other hand, systems which require only a single intensity image as input may be deployed in any scenario where existing equipment captures image data, for example CCTV cameras. Crucially, such a system could be used to recognise subjects for whom only a single training image exists. It is therefore clear that some of the most alluring applications of face recognition technology are made possible by robust methods for face shape recovery from single images. Image and Vision Computing No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science EP/F036949/1 First Grant Scheme None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:23 2012-02-29 CAD-GAME: Computer-Aided Game Design http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=TS/G002843/1 2009-03-01 University of York Creative Industries 27251 No summary is available for this grant. Artificial Intelligence Technologies,Human-Computer Interactions,User Interface Technologies No final report summary is available for this grant. Computer Science TS/G002843/1 Technology Programme TS/G002835/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:20 2013-03-31 Triple Diels-Alder Cascades: Development and Application to Daphnezomine Synthesis http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G068313/1 2010-04-01 University of York Healthcare 297057 We have recently shown that 1,2,4-triazines and ketones can be employed in a tandem cascade sequence producing complex polycyclic diamines. This remarkable transformation proceeds via initial enamine formation and then a triple Diels-Alder cascade (inverse electron demand, retro and intramolecular) transforming "flat" starting materials into complex polycyclic products with the formation of 2 new rings. 4 new bonds and 5 new stereogenic centres! Based on these encouraging preliminary results, we now seek funds to appoint a postdoctoral researcher who will optimise, extend and apply this new technology as follows: Chemical Synthetic Methodology No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/G068313/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:18 2013-08-31 The radical nature of oxidative stress triggered by metal nanoparticles http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H045031/1 2010-09-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 357959 Nanomaterials have unique chemical and physical properties and therefore have many exciting applications. However, the impact of nanomaterials on human health and environment is poorly understood. In order to enable future development of nanotechnology, basic understanding of how nanomaterials interact with cells is urgently needed. Analytical Science,Chemical Biology,Chemical Structure,Physical Organic Chemistry No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/H045031/1 Standard Research Dr P Genever None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:15 2010-03-31 Tandem Intramolecular Michael-Anion Exchange-Olefination Methodology: New Telescoped Approaches to alpha-Methylene Lactones http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E029841/1 2007-04-01 University of York Chemicals,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 358516 There is much current interest in the development of preparative procedures in which two or more transformations are carried out as a "one-pot" process. These processes offer a number of advantages to the organic chemist: in particular, they result in a reduced number of operations, giving significant time-cost benefits but also they can often allow "difficult" intermediate compounds to be prepared and elaborated in situ, thus preventing problems associated with their isolation and handling. Biological and Medicinal Chemistry No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/E029841/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:13 2010-07-31 SONS EUROCORES: Proposal 05-SONS-FP-014 Liquid Crystal Nanoparticles - LC-NANOP http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E064299/1 2007-08-01 University of York Electronics 511720 Liquid crystals (LCs) are the quintessential, self-organising, molecular materials of the modern era. The ease with which they can be reoriented in electrical, magnetic and mechanical fields has led to a plethora of applications, resulting, for example, in the dominance of the electro-optic displays market. Most LCs have been designed as either low molar-weight materials for displays (eg 4-alkyl-4'-cyanobiphenyls) or high molecular-weight materials for high yield-strength polymers (eg KevlarTM, and VectraTM). Functional Organics and Polymers: Characterisation,Functional Organics and Polymers: Synthesis and Growth No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/E064299/1 Standard Research Dr MA Bates,Dr IM Saez None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:10 2011-05-31 Signal Amplification in NMR and MRI using hyperpolarised compounds http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H029575/1 2010-06-01 University of York Chemicals,Healthcare,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 76491 The NMR Centre and the Neuroimaging Centre at the University of York have conducted a programme of work that has demonstrated that one of the fundamental limitations of conventional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques can be dramatically overcome. NMR is the most popular method for performing analytical and structural chemistry and MRI is the technique of choice for carrying out non-invasive imaging in humans. Even though the global markets for these techniques exceeds 6billion annually, as identified in a recent US report to Congress, both technologies are limited in application due to poor sensitivity. A process termed hyperpolarisation, developed in York throughout the last decade, allows these limitations to be overcome. We have recently shown that 0.5 seconds worth of data collection equates to 58 days on the conventional device. Analytical Science,Biological and Medicinal Chemistry,Chemical Structure,Computational and Theoretical Chemistry No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/H029575/1 Follow on Fund Professor GGR Green None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:07 2012-01-07 Signal Amplification in MR achieved through novel inorganic templates http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G009546/1 2009-01-08 University of York Chemicals,Healthcare,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 668449 Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is arguably one of the most important methods for characterising materials in solution. It relies on the fact that certain nuclei possess the property of magnetism. Consequently when they are placed in a uniform magnetic field a precise amount of energy is required to change their magnetic orientation and this is exploited to inform on their local physical and chemical environment. The most widely recognised use of this phenomenon is found the clinical application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which offers unparalleled non-invasive insights into the state and health of the body. Analytical Science,Biological and Medicinal Chemistry,Chemical Structure,Computational and Theoretical Chemistry No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/G009546/1 Standard Research Professor GGR Green None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:04 2009-03-31 Operando Studies of Palladium-Catalysed Cross-Coupling Surface Chemistry http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E046754/1 2007-04-01 University of York Chemicals 80485 Pd-catalysed cross-coupling reactions represent key technologies employed within academia and industry, however the fine chemicals sector urgently needs new catalytic systems for large-scale, continuous processing. This proposal underpins the development of alternative, heterogeneous Pd-catalysed processes to meet this demand. Commercialization of such catalytic clean technologies awaits detailed knowledge of their optimal formulation and associated reaction conditions. This information in turn requires insight into both the mechanisms of such surface reactions and their associated deactivation pathways in order to control both activity and selectivity (homo- versus cross-coupling). Here we propose to obtain microscopic-level understanding of Heck and Suzuki-Miyaura chemistry over well-defined model palladium surfaces through the use of operando surface spectroscopies and mechanistic reaction probes. We have recently pioneered the application of in-situ, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for real-time investigations of industrially significant, surface catalysed processes including alkyne trimerisation, C-H activation and VOC destruction. These methodologies will also allow us to determine whether heterogeneously catalysed cross-coupling shares common reaction intermediates and rate-limiting steps with its more conventional homogeneous counterparts. The intellectual output from this project will be invaluable in designing a new toolbox of high performance dispersed Pd catalysts that will revolutionise organic synthetic chemistry. Catalysis and Applied Catalysis,Surfaces, Surface Probes and Interfaces No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/E046754/1 Standard Research Professor IJ Fairlamb,Dr K Wilson None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:13:01 2010-12-31 Novel Transannulation Strategies for the Synthesis of Polycyclic Sesquiterpenoid Natural Products. http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F005970/1 2007-10-01 University of York Chemicals,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 294051 With the rise of antibiotic resistant superbugs there has been great pressure from government and the public for the development of new antibiotics to combat this emerging threat to health. Government statistics show that the number of infections of MRSA in UK hospitals have increased from around 7247 in 2001 to 7684 in 2004. The reduction of these infections has been designated a priority by the Department of Health, which has charged the NHS to reduce infections by 50% by 2008, however, the figures for the last full year reported (2005) show a reduction by only 6%! In addition to combating antibiotic resistant bacteria the government has also announced a major initiative highlighting cancer treatment as an area of high national priority. In support of this initiative they have invested an extra 210M in the battle against cancer, with an additional 20M a year specifically targeted for research. One of the more successful strategies for finding new therapeutic leads is the screening of extracts from plant and animal sources. The most notable success in this area was the discovery of Taxol, a diterpenoid natural product, and its use in cancer therapy. The terpenoid class of natural products have been isolated from a vast array of natural sources and have a rich structural diversity. This structural diversity leads to a wide profile of biological activity. Over the last 50 years, extracts from a range of liverworts have been shown to have impressive activity as antibiotics and anti cancer agents. However, it is only in the last 30 years that the structures of the active components have been elucidated. Some of the most exciting compounds from both an architectural and biological view point are the pinguisane-type sesquiterpenoids, such as pinguisenol 1, acutifolone A 2 and deoxo-pinguisone 3, which have been shown to exhibit sizable activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Gaffkya tetragena micro organisms and sarcoma 37 mice cancer cells. These encouraging preliminary results, coupled with the urgency to find new treatments, makes the development of a general method to access the piguisane-type structure of considerable importance to the pharmaceutical industry, and hence, the fight against disease. Biological and Medicinal Chemistry,Chemical Synthetic Methodology No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/F005970/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:58 2010-09-30 New Tandem Approaches to Functionalised Cyclopropanes: Development and Applications http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E041302/1 2007-10-01 University of York Chemicals,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 107950 We have recently developed a range of manganese dioxide-mediated tandem oxidation processes (TOPs) in which primary alcohols are oxidised and the intermediate aldehydes are trapped in situ to give alkenes, alkynes, imines, oximes, amines, nitriles, esters, amides and heterocyclic systems via one-pot procedures. These TOP sequences offer a number of advantages to the synthetic organic chemist, both in academic/medical research and in scale-up applications: they are operationally straightforward, the MnO2 and its by-products being removed by a simple filtration; they result in a reduced number of operations, giving significant time-cost benefits; they allow the use of "difficult" carbonyl intermediates (i.e. those that are volatile, toxic or noxious) as they are prepared and elaborated in situ. These initial studies concentrated on 1,2-additions to the intermediate carbonyl compounds, such as oxidation-Wittig and oxidation-imination sequences. Chemical Synthetic Methodology No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/E041302/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:55 2013-03-31 New Ruthenium Catalysts for C-C bond Formation: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Approach http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H011455/1 2009-10-01 University of York Chemicals,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 237350 The preparation of novel chemical compounds forms a fundamental part of the development of a wide range of important materials in modern society such as pharmaceuticals, agricultural agents, plastics etc. The majority of compounds for these applications are based on the element carbon and new and efficient ways to form new carbon-carbon and carbon-X (where X is a different element) are required. Catalysis and Applied Catalysis No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/H011455/1 Standard Research Dr JM Slattery None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:52 2011-09-30 Nanoparticle-doped Mesoporous Silicates / Synthetic Developments and Applications in Catalysis http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F009488/1 2007-10-01 University of York Chemicals 325191 This proposal seeks to build upon DWB's discovery of a general route to nanoparticle-doped, nanostructured silicates that uses simple and off-the-shelf reagents in a true liquid crystal templating methodology. The proposal is in two, linked parts. In the first, the general methodology will be extended to: encompass a wider range of metals; exert control over particle size and metal oxidation state; employ block co-polymer templates to access cubic pore morphologies and to extend the preparation of bimetallic particles. The second part focuses on real-world catalytic applications using catalysts produced using this methodology, namely automotive exhaust emission control and selective hydrogenation of allylic species. Catalysis and Applied Catalysis,Chemical Synthetic Methodology,Solid-state Chemistry No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/F009488/1 Standard Research Professor AF Lee,Dr K Wilson None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:50 2010-04-30 Microwave-induced plasma promoted dielectric heating: metrology and application to the photocatalytic activation of water http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E018653/1 2007-05-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 345974 There is a clear and effective need for the synthesis of new materials that can sustain and develop future technologies and underpin modern society. To increase the diversity of materials accessible it is necessary to develop new synthetic techniques. The proposed research describes the application of microwave radiation to provide energy to drive chemical reactions between solids and/or between solids and gases. A confined gas when exposed to microwave radiation can ionise giving rise to a microwave-induced plasma (MIP) that can be used to provide heat to drive reaction between bulk solids and as a source of reactive gas species that can chemically modify a material. Many polar liquids (e.g. water) and some solids do interact directly with microwaves causing rapid heating and reaction, but many technologically important materials are transparent to microwaves at room temperature thus preventing use in reactions. However, direct microwave (dielectric) heating is temperature dependent and many materials will directly couple with microwaves at elevated temperatures. Unfortunately quantitative data enumerating the temperature dependence of dielectric heating for most solids is not currently available. Catalysis and Applied Catalysis,Functional Organics and Polymers: Synthesis and Growth,Solid-state Chemistry,Structural Ceramics and Inorganics: Characterisation No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/E018653/1 Standard Research EP/E018262/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:47 2010-11-30 Liquid-crystalline Triplet Emitters of Iridium(III) http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H006710/1 2009-12-01 University of York Chemicals 117502 Flat-panel displays now outsell those based on cathode ray tube technologies and by far the most popular of these are liquid crystal displays. However, OLEDs represent a competitive technology that can have niche applications and that are very compatible with printing technologies and mechanically flexible displays. Organic LED materials (e.g. polymers LEDs) emit from singlet states created in the device by charge injection, but the triplet states produced have lifetimes that are too long (i.e. milliseconds) to be useful. As three times as many triplet state are produced compared to singlet states, efficiency in these systems is not optimised. To be useful, triplet emitters need much shorter lifetimes. This can be accomplished in metal complexes containing heavy transition elements where efficient spin-orbit coupling 'circumvents' the spin-forbibben nature of triplet decay, allowing emission from singlet and triplet states. The metal complexes currently used in devices contain iridium(III) (these are the red emitting component). Chemical Synthetic Methodology,Functional Organics and Polymers: Characterisation,Functional Organics and Polymers: Synthesis and Growth No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/H006710/1 Follow on Fund None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:44 2011-02-28 Liquid Crystals (LCs) at Various Wavelengths of Light http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/D055261/1 2006-03-01 University of York Chemicals 423563 Liquid crystals are found in every day devices such as flat panel displays. They were first introduced in watch displays, and the nematic materials which were invented in Hull provided the first suitable stable materials for practical applications. Thus the UK science base (Hull, BDH and RSRE) were behind the development of today's enormous display industry. Since the watch displays were commercialised in the 1970's, LCDs have grown bigger both in terms of physical size and market share. Chemical and Engineering News recently indicated the market would reach over 55m displays per annum by 2009, and now there are as many LCDs in the world as there are people. Chemical Synthetic Methodology,Functional Organics and Polymers: Characterisation,Functional Organics and Polymers: Synthesis and Growth No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/D055261/1 Platform Grants Dr MA Bates,Professor D Bruce,Dr A Matharu,Dr IM Saez,Professor VA Vladimirov None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:41 2011-11-30 High Resolution Infrared Laser Spectroscopy of Metal-Containing Radicals http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F032455/1 2007-12-01 University of York Chemicals 420703 We propose to record infrared spectra of small metal-containing polyatomic free radicals using a new laser spectrometer. The very recent availability of a high-power, single frequency source of widely tunable infrared radiation will revolutionise the study of transient metal-containing species. We propose to synthesise these molecules in a metal flow reactor and in a laser vaporisation jet expansion source based on relatively standard techniques. The novelty comes from the ultrasensitive detection of these new free radicals by infrared-optical double resonance spectroscopy and by direct infrared absorption spectroscopy using the cavity ringdown technique. The target molecules are models for the more complex species involved in catalysis and inorganic chemistry. Electronic structure, electron distributions, vibrational frequencies and molecular geometry can all be studied with exquisite precision by high resolution laser spectroscopy and compared with the predictions of quantum chemistry. The quality of quantum chemical predictions will be critically assessed and this will ultimately lead to improved models for more complex systems. Chemical Structure,Computational and Theoretical Chemistry,Gas and Solution Phase Reactions No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/F032455/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:38 2010-03-31 Discover and Explore Green Consumer Products http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F022867/1 2008-01-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 74805 It is almost impossible to ignore the profusion of information currently in the media regarding environmental issues. In particular, with the recent announcements from leading retailers declaring their commitment to becoming carbon neutral, consumers' awareness of these issues is continuing to grow. However, to what extent do they understand the science behind these claims and are they able to access an easy-to-understand and balanced source of information to answer their queries? It is increasingly being recognised that the application of green chemistry will be fundamental to the production of environmentally friendly products that have both the confidence and trust of consumers. The emergence of green chemistry has been one of the most significant developments in the chemical sciences in recent years. However the awareness and understanding of green chemistry amongst the general public is limited, and it is commonly perceived that chemistry is the cause of environmental problems rather than the solution. This lack of confidence in chemicals could be at least in part attributed to current concerns highlighted in the press and pressure from NGOs, and can only be resolved through directly engaging with consumers and connecting them with chemicals in a positive way. Public Engagement - Direct Interaction,Public Engagement - Engaging the General Public,Public Engagement in Chemistry No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/F022867/1 Partnerships for Public Engagement None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:35 2011-09-30 Dictyosphaeric Acids, Colletofragarones and Novel Drug Discovery Scaffolds: Doubly Tethered Intramolecular-Michael Approach http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E03456X/1 2007-10-01 University of York Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 132345 Dictyosphaeric acid A, a recently-discovered natural product, has been shown to inhibit methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA. The closely related colletofragarones are also biologically active (germination self-inhibitors). The unique tricyclic core present in both families of natural products appears to represent a "privileged" template for SAR studies. Biological and Medicinal Chemistry,Chemical Synthetic Methodology No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/E03456X/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:32 2010-08-02 Development of a Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation based NMR techniques for the rapid detection and characterisation of reaction intermediates. http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F022530/1 2008-03-03 University of York Chemicals 264909 Project Summary Analytical Science,Catalysis and Applied Catalysis No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/F022530/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:29 2012-10-13 COMPARATIVE PHOTO-INDUCED OXIDATIVE ADDITION OF B-H, C-H, Si-H AND B-B BONDS http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F037740/1 2008-07-14 University of York Chemicals 515715 A knowledge of reaction mechanisms is what enables chemists to predict the outcome of new reactions and work out how to make new compounds most effectively. Transition-metal compounds containing metals such as rhodium and ruthenium are used extensively as catalysts for organic and industrial processes. Oxidative addition reactions form a well-known class of reactions of such catalysts. There are two major developments in oxidative addition reactions that this project addresses: (1) the development of catalytic reactions of the simplest hydrocarbons (e.g. benzene or pentane) with boron compounds that yield very useful products for further reactions (2) the realisation that oxidative addition reactions sometimes proceed via non-classical intermediates called "sigma complexes"; for instance, a silane may bind to the metal without breaking the silicon-hydrogen bond in the intermediate sigma-complex, although it is completely broken in the product. Firstly, in proof of principle experiments, we have demonstrated that we can make rhodium compounds that contain right-handed ligands. We can then obtain oxidative addition products that have metal centres that are either right-handed or left-handed and can monitor exchange of these two isomers. This exchange process tells us about the existence of intermediates (or transition states) with a mirror plane. With the help of theory and experiment we can infer the existence of sigma complexes. Secondly, this proposal addresses the question of what is special about boron by measuring the rates of reaction of carefully selected transition metal compounds with the boron compounds using a short light pulse to initiate the reactions. The results will be interpreted with the aid of theoretical calculations carried out in collaboration with Eisenstein, a well-known theorist. Thirdly, we will use NMR spectroscopy to determine the distribution of products when different combinations of reagents are in competition, for instance allowing silicon and boron compounds to compete for the same transition metal species. Finally, we will investigate transition metal complexes that are claimed to be suitable for two oxidative addition reactions in succession. These precursor complexes react on irradiation of light and it would be especially interesting for applications if they can be initiated with visible light rather than ultra-violet light. Overall, this study will give us a detailed picture of the relationships between different types of oxidative addition reactions that can be fed into catalyst design. Catalysis and Applied Catalysis,Chemical Synthetic Methodology,Co-ordination Chemistry,Gas and Solution Phase Reactions No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/F037740/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:26 2011-04-30 Commercial Development of Starbon Technologies for Catalysis http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H027858/1 2010-05-01 University of York Chemicals,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 145105 The goals of the this Follow-on award at the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence at the University of York are: Biomass, Bioenergy and Biofuels,Bioprocess Engineering,Chemical Synthetic Methodology,Process Systems, Modelling and Design No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/H027858/1 Follow on Fund Dr D MacQuarrie None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:23 2011-09-16 Carbon Dioxide and Alkanes as Electron-sink and Source in a Solar Nanocell: towards Tandem Photosynthesis of Carbon Monoxide and Methanol http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F047770/1 2008-09-17 University of York Chemicals,Energy 363179 A major solar energy challenge is the goal of artificial synthesis in which sunlight is used to generate fuels or high energy chemicals. Natural photosynthesis uses solar energy to generate dioxygen and carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water, but the targets of artificial photosynthesis can be more diverse. Our vision is to create a solar nano-device which will drive the coupled photo-conversion of methane and carbon dioxide into methanol and carbon monoxide respectively. This challenging target differs fundamentally from the familiar one of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. Our target offers products both on the oxidation and the reduction sides that are significant fuels or feedstocks. The photocatalytic reduction of CO2 and oxidation of alkanes represent long-standing goals of great complexity, but we base our concepts on well-established principles. We break down the goals into individual components, each of which is highly challenging within its own right and delivery of each would constitute a major breakthrough. The challenges will be met by a team of scientists, integrated across the four centres of Manchester, Nottingham, York and Norwich, who lead teams with expertise in photophysics, nanoscience, photochemistry, electrochemistry and synthesis. Thus these researchers will seek to establish the science required to underpin technologies that will allow the conversion of abundant and environmentally damaging feedstocks into products of high economic value by constructing a new class of solar device capable of driving green chemical reactions. Catalysis and Applied Catalysis,Functional Ceramics and Inorganics: Synthesis and Growth,Solar Technology,Sustainable Energy Vectors No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/F047770/1 Standard Research EP/F047878/1,EP/F04772X/1,EP/F047789/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:21 2012-11-30 Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystals:reducing symmetry to increase order and develop novel applications http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G023611/1 2009-12-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 313601 The invention and development of liquid crystal materials in the 1970s and 80s led to the now hugely successful flat panel display industry, and allowed the development of all sorts of portable technology, including lap-top computers and mobile phones. The key to the success of these technologies has been the engineering of functional materials to enhance their application specifically to liquid crystal displays. The displays technology is mature, but there are now exciting, new developments in the area of liquid crystals that promise to have significant impact on future technologies. This proposal addresses one kind of new liquid crystal, the so-called biaxial nematic systems. The reduced symmetry that occurs in these systems results in many potential implications, and we are particularly interested in exploring their potential in new electro-optic applications (which may include switchable diffraction gratings - important for optical communications) and non-linear optics, since the materials are electrically switchable, and already have nonlinear coefficients comparable to useful solid-state systems. Colloids, Soft Solids and Complex Fluids,Functional Ceramics and Inorganics: Synthesis and Growth,Functional Organics and Polymers: Characterisation,Optical Phenomena,Optics - Applied No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/G023611/1 Standard Research Dr SJ COWLING EP/G023093/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:19 2010-03-31 Be green and save the planet with Fabs the Frog! http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H500758/1 2010-01-01 University of York 900 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/H500758/1 NSEW Awards - RCUK None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:16 2011-03-31 Back to Basics: Investigating Structure, Reactivity and Catalysis of Organolithium-Diamine Complexes http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E02002X/1 2007-10-01 University of York Chemicals,Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology 109665 This project is concerned with developing a deeper insight into a fundamental process in organic chemistry, namely deprotonation of a weak carbon acid using a strong base. Acid-base interactions and "deprotonation" is a concept first met in school chemistry classes (acid-base titrations). Deprotonation using a strong base composed of a reactive organolithium reagent complexed to a diamine has become one of the most powerful tools in organic synthesis in recent times. It is also possible to use a chiral diamine (of which naturally occurring (/)-sparteine is the most famous) to control the stereochemistry (or handedness) of the products. Unfortunately, despite their widespread use in synthesis, very little structural and mechanistic information is known about these organolithium-diamine complexes. In this project, collaboration between two groups (O'Brien, York, UK) and (Hilmersson, Goteborg, Sweden) with complementary areas of expertise will be established to unravel the complexities of organolithium-diamine-mediated deprotonation processes. The research will investigate the kinetics and thermodynamics of complexing diamines to organolithiums as well as the solution structures and stoichiometry of the complexes that are formed. This project will also deliver a considerable body of kinetic data on reactivity of organolithiums complexed to diamines which will inform the synthetic chemists and allow organolithium reactions to be optimised (in industry and academia). All of these results will be combined to understand and rationalise one-ligand and two-ligand catalytic asymmetric deprotonation processes, an under-developed research area, which has received no mechanistic attention thus far. This project is of much importance and use to Process R & D groups of, for example, pharmaceutical companies and Astra-Zeneca are specifically supporting the research. Asymmetric Chemistry,Catalysis and Applied Catalysis,Physical Organic Chemistry No final report summary is available for this grant. Chemistry EP/E02002X/1 Standard Research None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:12 2011-01-06 The TRANSIT Programme - Discipline Bridging at the University of York http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F032749/1 2008-01-07 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 374443 Research at Universities and other organisations underpins the scientific, technological and medical advances that increasingly influence and drive society and commerce. The degree of training and knowledge required to operate at the cutting edge of scientific research is such that scientists are increasingly specialised to their own field. Scientists in a given field (like any community) have a tendency to develop their own methods and (often impenetrable) jargon. This specialisation is entrenched within universities, where different disciplines are often located in separate departments As a consequence, scientists are more likely to interact with those within their own discipline than with colleagues in other disciplines, leading to a rather narrow focus to research activities. Chemical Biology,Complexity Science,Information and Knowledge Management,Non-linear Systems Mathematics No final report summary is available for this grant. Biology EP/F032749/1 Standard Research Dr GW Delius,Dr A Sebald,Professor S Stepney,Professor J Timmis,Dr AJ Wood None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:09 2010-02-03 Modelling the osteocyte network and its control of the mechanotransduction and remodelling of bone http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E057241/1 2008-02-04 University of York Healthcare 8292 Bone is a remarkable material which goes through an initial phase of growth and development to maturity, followed by a continuous cycle of repair, renewal and optimisation throughout the rest of its life / by a process called 'remodelling'. Surprisingly, the mechanisms controlling bone remodelling are still not completely understood; but it is known, that they are very complex and change with use, with age, with disease and with other factors. Control Systems Engineering, Integration and Autonomy,Medical Modelling and Simulation,Quantitative Predictive Biology Bone is a remarkable material which goes through an initial phase of growth and development to maturity, followed by a continuous cycle of repair, renewal and optimisation throughout the rest of its life / by a process called 'remodelling'. Surprisingly, the mechanisms controlling bone remodelling are still not completely understood; but it is known, that they are very complex and change with use, with age, with disease and with other factors. Biology EP/E057241/1 Standard Research EP/E057365/1 None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:06 2014-09-30 Industrial CASE Account - York 2009 http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H501681/1 2009-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 391764 none Postgraduate Education and Training No final report summary is available for this grant. Biology EP/H501681/1 Industrial Case Account None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:04 2012-09-30 Industrial CASE Account - York 2008 http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G501858/1 2008-10-01 University of York No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 382734 N/A Postgraduate Education and Training No final report summary is available for this grant. Biology EP/G501858/1 Industrial Case Account None
http://www.york.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:12:01 2010-03-31 Discover and Explore the Brain http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H501894/1 2010-01-01 University of York 665 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. Biology EP/H501894/1 NSEW Awards - RCUK None
http://www.wlv.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:57 2010-09-30 Collaborative Training Account: University of Wolverhampton http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/D506999/1 2005-05-01 University of Wolverhampton 107721 No summary is available for this grant. No final report summary is available for this grant. The Graduate School EP/D506999/1 Collaborative Training Account None
http://www.wmin.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:53 2010-07-24 Building Collaboration and Engagement for Media Professionals and Academic Researchers http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/H032568/1 2010-01-25 University of Westminster Communications,Creative Industries 47670 The proposed project will create a knowledge exchange network between media professionals and academic researchers, to explore the potential of new forms of public service media, and will explore ways in which academic researchers can utilise new technologies to better disseminate and exchange their research and ideas. Arts and Humanities Interface No final report summary is available for this grant. Sch of Media Arts and Design EP/H032568/1 Standard Research Dr P Goodwin,Dr E Jackson None
http://www.wmin.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:50 2013-05-25 Extending the Applications and Improving the Efficiency of Positioning Through the Exploitation of New GNSS Signals http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G017107/1 2009-05-26 University of Westminster Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Communications,Transport Systems and Vehicles 630612 Over the past three decades the US GPS (Global Positioning System) has evolved from a system designed to provide metre-level positioning for military applications to one that is used for a diverse range of unforeseen, and mainly civilian, applications. This evolution has been both driven and underpinned by fundamental research, including that carried out at UK universities, especially in the fields of error modeling, receiver design and sensor integration. However, GPS and its current augmentations still cannot satisfy the ever increasing demands for higher performance. For instance there is insufficient coverage in many urban areas, it is not accurate enough for some engineering applications such as the laying of road pavements and receivers cannot reliably access signals indoors. Digital Signal Processing,Mobile Computing,Radio Frequency (RF) and Microwave Technology No final report summary is available for this grant. Sch of Electronics and Computer Science EP/G017107/1 Standard Research EP/G019622/1,EP/G019533/1,EP/G01969X/1 None
http://www.warwick.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:40 2011-05-31 Managing the Data Explosion in Post-Genomic Biology with Fast Bayesian Computational Methods http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F027400/1 2008-06-01 University of Warwick No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 263933 Rapid technological advances in molecular biology are providing an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the basic processes of life. This `post-genomic' phase of molecular biology has resulted in an explosion of typically high dimensional structured data from new technologies for transcriptomics (microarrays), proteomics and metabolomics. Such data requires novel mathematical, statistical and computational methods for their interpretation and analysis. This proposal focuses on the development of statistical and computational methods for the analysis of such data, using novel approaches from the fields of machine learning and nonparametric Bayesian statistics. The project involves a close collaboration of scientists with expertise in machine learning and statistics, bioinformatics and molecular biology. The new software tools will be developed in the context of real-world scientific problems, such as: elucidating signalling networks in plant stress responses; metabolic regulation in the bacteria Streptomyces, major producers of antibiotics and delineating the molecular mechanisms contributing to mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. The scientific goal of the project will be to apply these novel methods to modelling bioinformatics data, but the methods developed will be broadly applicable across a number of fields. Artificial Intelligence Technologies,Bioinformatics,Quantitative Predictive Biology,Statistics and Applied Probability No final report summary is available for this grant. Warwick Systems Biology Centre EP/F027400/1 Standard Research EP/F028504/1,EP/F028628/1 None
http://www.warwick.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:37 2012-03-31 Research Collaboration between WMG and IIT Kharagpur http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/I002456/1 2010-04-01 University of Warwick Manufacturing,Healthcare,Transport Systems and Vehicles 25052 Summary: ICT Networks and Distributed Systems,Manufacturing Business Strategy,Medical Instrumentation, Devices and Equipment,Transportation Operations and Management No final report summary is available for this grant. Warwick Manufacturing Group EP/I002456/1 Overseas Travel Grants None
http://www.warwick.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:34 2011-09-30 The EmergeNET: Towards a Unifying Investigation in Emergence, Emergent Phenomena and Complexity http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E061850/1 2007-10-01 University of Warwick No relevance to Underpinning Sectors 8358 The very definition of complexity and emergence is itself a non-trivial problem. Complexity refers to situations where many simple interacting parts produce an unexpected collective behaviour. This calls for another imprecise concept that is emergence. Complex systems can display the emergence of properties at the macroscopic level that are not found at the microscopic level. One important example of emergence is self-organization. Self-organisation occurs as parts of a complex adaptive system, such as oil molecules in a thin layer, self-organise to form patterns in a state that is statistically stable. The basic mechanism for self organisation comes from feedback. Each part can communicate with its neighbours and arrange into a common collective behaviour. Sometimes, regardless the precise dynamics of the interactions, the evolution of the system is represented by some statistically stable state. This means that this steady state is an 'attractor' in the phase space for the system dynamics and accounts for the robustness of complex systems with respect to external perturbation. Complexity Science,New and Emerging Computer Paradigms,Non-linear Systems Mathematics No final report summary is available for this grant. Warwick Business School EP/E061850/1 Standard Research EP/E062814/1,EP/E061931/1 None
http://www.warwick.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:31 2010-05-31 Special Structures in Vehicle Routing Problems http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/F017871/1 2008-06-01 University of Warwick Transport Systems and Vehicles 169724 The purpose of this collaborative research is to further develop the theory of polynomially solvable cases for computationally hard problems of combinatorial optimisation; to investigate special structures in real-life vehicle routing applications; and, in collaboration with practitioners from Coventry City Council, to design, implement and test algorithms that would use the identified special structures to find efficient solutions to practical problems. Mathematical Aspects of Operational Research,Transportation Operations and Management No final report summary is available for this grant. Warwick Business School EP/F017871/1 Standard Research Professor B Chen,Dr A Tiskin None
http://www.warwick.ac.uk 2010-05-25 06:11:28 2010-07-31 Developing a participative user tool to aid the conceptual development of simulation models in healthcare. http://gow.epsrc.ac.uk/ViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/E045871/1 2007-08-01 University of Warwick Healthcare 198236 The NHS spending is expected to increase from 70 billion a year to more than 90 billion by 2007/8 but this may not be enough for the government to achieve the planned health care delivery targets because it faces new challenges such as the increasing demands of a population that is living longer. Patients will only benefit from this increase in spending if the health care delivery system is more efficient and effective. Manufacturing Enterprise Operations and Management,Mathematical Aspects of Operational Research No final report summary is available for this grant. Warwick Business School EP/E045871/1 First Grant Scheme Dr C Vasilakis None

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March 2014
Permalink Hide details Show details 1395049113.109623_11d037d7-3245-4078-9c20-e8db0d1ba23e 09:38, 17 March 2014 1394953327.187331_bb7b06f2-6dbd-42c9-9627-29df725d04bc 07:02, 16 March 2014 1394836233.036632_7ce6ca16-f2dd-4c9c-a5c5-7ec3238a0a0c 22:31, 14 March 2014 1394746320.161326_e0e43c26-3ff2-4af9-a536-c7356d4b6c70 21:33, 13 March 2014 1394654121.757389_37e77437-6685-4958-9a52-37615c9d1563 19:55, 12 March 2014 1394554607.898667_7e1b9806-6d7f-4dc7-913f-da538b2b91d0 16:17, 11 March 2014 1394554607.105096_17b89636-ad90-4a9d-bdab-a72ebb76bb2c 16:17, 11 March 2014 1394465035.000498_b4324792-3e2b-4417-8e5f-cd84ca544d49 15:24, 10 March 2014 1394361151.339097_b7a325dd-c69a-495b-a5b9-05893f18d938 10:33, 9 March 2014 1394274455.827460_ac9e9960-e0bd-4238-b1d8-324d1be6e0e2 10:28, 8 March 2014
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