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<p>Wednesday 14 September 2011<br>RTS Cambridge Convention</p> <p><strong>CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY</strong></p> <p><strong>“Boldness be my friend”<br><br></strong><strong>1. Boldness reduces risk<br><br></strong>One of the lessons I learned in business was that when presented with a series of options, sometimes what seems the cautious option is actually the highest risk. <br><br>Certainly many in the technology industry would agree. <br><br>Like Apple, the company that this year became - albeit briefly - the biggest in the world. I remember meeting Apple's Chief Designer Jony Ive in California a year ago.<br><br>Jony described how Apple deliberately has a very small product line to make sure that every detail of every product gets microscopic attention.<br><br>Think about the risks inherent in that strategy. One of the biggest companies in the world, under huge pressure to grow sales and profits, and with multiple opportunities to diversify. Yet what they realised was that being bold and only focusing on a small number of products was actually lower and not higher risk.<br><br>It gave Jony Ive and his design team the best possible chance of developing products that truly turned heads.<br><br>He gave me an example of this concerning the early iPhone prototypes. They found that people were accidentally activating their touch screens with their ears during phone calls. It took months to find a way of knowing when to switch the multi-touch sensor off.<br><br>Would they have taken that trouble if they had thousands of products in their portfolio? I doubt it. But because of their fanatical focus they increased not reduced their likelihood of success.<br><br>I think we have a similar moment now when it comes to UK communications policy. It would be easy to be cautious.<br><br>But with technology evolving rapidly, consumer behaviour shifting and the world economy suffering this would actually be the most dangerous thing we could do. So we should recognise the wisdom of Shakespeare’s phrase from Cymbeline: “Boldness be my friend.”<br></p> <p><strong>2. Boldness in local TV<br><br></strong>I have tried to practise what I preach in two areas of media policy - local TV and superfast broadband. <br><br>Many think I have been not so much bold as foolhardy to keep pressing on with plans for local TV. <br><br>Some from the London media establishment are still sceptical. It won't be viable, no one will watch it and...most extraordinary of all we shouldn't want people to watch it anyway.<br><br>But when I announced in August that in the next two years Ofcom will be awarding up to 65 local TV licenses, the reaction outside London was amazing. Packed meetings - sometimes with standing room only - in Birmingham, Manchester, Newcastle, Newport, Glasgow and Belfast.<br><br>Why? Because the plans I announced dealt with the single biggest reservation people have had about local TV, namely its commercial viability. They have for the first time reduced the cost of running a new station to below the level of running a local newspaper.<br><br>As a result it is possible that by 2015 more than half the population of the country will be able to access a good quality local TV service.  We will have a brand new sector for the creative industries, creating jobs for journalists and opportunities for independent production companies.<br></p> <p><strong>3. Boldness in broadband<br><br></strong>We have been equally bold on broadband. In a time of limited public money I announced the ambition for Britain to have the best superfast network in Europe by 2015.<br><br>Mission impossible? In August I announced radical plans that make it possible to deliver not just universal coverage of 2 Mbps but 90% coverage for superfast broadband. <br><br>And nearly everyone has risen to the challenge. 7 projects in the Highlands, Cumbria, Herefordshire, North Yorkshire, Wiltshire, Norfolk and Somerset and Devon have started. And today I can announce another two have been added to the list – Rutland and Suffolk.<br><br>All these areas have broadband plans that can deliver on that ambition. I want everywhere to be able to say the same - and unlike a year ago it now looks likely that everywhere will.<br><br></p> <p><strong>4. Bold thinking with respect to the new Communications Act<br><br></strong>But today I want to talk about the need for boldness in a new area - perhaps a relief to those of you expecting a sermon on local TV...<br><br>I want to outline in some detail what our next Communications Act should contain.<br><br>First, a disclaimer. Lord Justice Leveson has only just started his inquiry and the government will of course listen carefully to his recommendations before making any decisions on press regulation and media ownership. <br><br>Nor have we published our Green Paper. We are still considering the consultation responses, many of them from people in this room. So I am not going to outline a draft Bill. But today will be, I hope, a clear direction of travel - and in particular a framework for the three radical elements I want the Act to contain.<br><br></p> <p><strong>5. Promoting growth: the opportunity for the UK <br><br></strong>The first priority must be to capitalise on the extraordinary opportunity presented by our digital and creative industries.<br><br>Earlier this week Philip Schindler, Google’s European CEO, said that this sector could be worth 350,000 jobs to the UK.<br><br>I would go further and say it is an opportunity that is probably bigger for this country than any in the world except the United States. <br><br>That is because we are the second largest producer of digital content in the world - and the internet makes it possible to distribute that content worldwide at close to zero cost.<br><br>Our small country can be proud to have:</p> <p>And finally, after the 'annus horribilis' of phone hacking, we should remember that if it turns out to have been as widespread in British journalism as many fear, it was uncovered, and will end up being stopped, by other British journalists doing investigative journalism of the highest quality.<br></p> <p><strong>6. Basic principles behind the new Comms Act<br><br></strong>Much of our success in the digital and creative industries is the result of bold interventions at critical moments.<br><br>Like the licensing of Channel Four in 1982.<br>The unleashing of the cable and satellite revolution in the 1990s.<br><br>The terms of trade that helped establish Europe's largest independent production sector.<br><br>Or the focus on competition that resulted in some of the world’s lowest broadband prices. <br><br>These bold moves have delivered choice for the consumer and world-class sectors.<br><br>So what are the bold moves for our generation to take?<br><br>As a businessman I know we need a light touch, flexible and predictable regulatory environment to encourage investment and innovation.<br><br>As a parent I want value for money and services that are safe for my children.<br><br>As a consumer I want quality, fair prices and sensible privacy protection.<br><br>And as a citizen, I want plurality of news provision so I can be confident that no one person or organisation exerts too much control over where I get my news from.</p> <p><strong>7. Growth-promoting measures</strong></p> <p type="a"><strong>9. Media plurality reforms<br><br></strong>So what can be done to improve the protection of media plurality? </p> <p><strong>10. Reforms to protect standards in the press<br><br></strong>But freedom of expression is not just about media plurality. We also need to reform the regulatory regime for newspapers and their websites – sites that increasingly host video on demand content and could eventually become internet-delivered TV channels.<br><br>As the Prime Minister said to the Liaison Committee of the House of Commons, it is important that in our desire to address the issues surrounding phone-hacking, we do not over-compensate. Our free press has served us incredibly well. So we do not want any changes to result in the back door imposition of statutory broadcast-style regulation.</p> <p><strong>11. Protecting consumers and companies from offensive and unlawful content.<br></strong><br>The final area the new Comms Act needs to address is the protection of consumers and companies from offensive content and from the damage done by unlawful or unlawfully distributed content.<br><br>Here we need to make a clear distinction between offensive and unlawful content.</p> <p>Experience in America shows that these goals can be achieved by voluntary agreements – but if not we will look at legislative solutions and include these in our forthcoming Communications Green Paper.<br></p> <p><strong>12. Conclusion<br><br></strong>So in summary, there are three fundamental areas where we need radical change in the new Communications Act. <br><br>Action to promote growth, largely around stimulating investment in a strong digital infrastructure.<br><br>Action to protect plurality and freedom of expression within a rapidly changing digital environment. <br><br>And finally, action to protect and encourage investment in intellectual property, a great source of opportunity for the UK. Sitting on the sidelines can never be an option if we are seeking global competitive advantage.<br><br>It needs imagination, determination and vision. <br><br>Boldness be my friend. <br><br>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8428.aspx Jeremy Hunt Royal Television Society uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 14/09/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport RTS Cambridge Convention
<p>Monday 18 July 2011</p> <p><strong>Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media &amp; Sport (Jeremy Hunt):<br></strong></p> <p>Today, I am publishing a new framework setting out proposals to help create a new generation of local TV services across the UK. </p> <p>The framework outlines the steps the Government intends to take by using available secondary order making powers and the funding of up to £40 million secured through the licence fee settlement with the BBC to support local TV services. <br></p> <p>The proposals include three statutory instruments: the first, to reserve sufficient local, low-cost spectrum for carrying the local TV services; the second to create a proportionate and targeted licensing regime for the spectrum and local TV service operators; and the third, to secure appropriate prominence for the licensed local services in television electronic programme guides.<br></p> <p>Local TV will provide news and other content for local audiences helping to hold local institutions to account and providing proper local perspectives.  This framework offers the right incentives to the market to develop innovative business models; provides greater certainty and reduced risk for investors; and encourages new market opportunities and growth.  <br></p> <p>This framework takes into account a range of views provided to the Government through an earlier consultation and has involved a broad assessment of the technical, commercial and regulatory requirements involved.  Information on spectrum coverage and possible locations will be made available in due course.</p> <p>It is expected the first local television licences will be awarded by Ofcom from summer 2012.  I have placed copies of the framework and associated impact assessment in the libraries of both Houses.<br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8329.aspx Jeremy Hunt Written Ministerial Statement: A New Framework for Local Television uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 18/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Monday 11 July 2011</p> <p><strong>The Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (Mr Jeremy Hunt): </strong>Mr Speaker the events of last week shocked the nation. Our proud tradition of journalism, which for centuries has bravely held those in positions of power or responsibility to account without fear or favour, was shaken by the revelation of what we now know to have happened at News of the World. The perpetrators of those acts not only broke the law, they preyed on the grief of families who had lost loved ones either as a result of foul murders or giving their life for their country. I hope the law shows no mercy on those responsible and no mercy on any managers who condoned such appalling behaviour.</p> <p>As a result of what happened the Prime Minister last week announced two independent enquiries to examine what went wrong and recommend to the government how we can make sure it never happens again.</p> <p>First, a full, judge led, public inquiry into the original police investigation. Witnesses will be questioned under oath and no stone will be left unturned.  As The Prime Minister announced on Friday that Inquiry will need to answer the following questions. Why did the first police investigation fail?  What exactly was going on at the News of the World, and what was going on at other newspapers?  The bulk of the work of this inquiry can only happen after the police investigation has finished but we will start what we can now. </p> <p>Second, a separate inquiry to look at the culture, the practices and the ethics of the British press.  In particular, they will look at how our newspapers are regulated and make recommendations for the future. That Inquiry should start as soon as possible, ideally this summer. As the Prime Minister said a free press is an essential component of our democracy and for our way of life.  But press freedom does not mean that the press should be above the law and in announcing this inquiry the Prime Minister has invited views on the way the press should be regulated in the future.</p> <p>I also have to make a decision about News Corporation’s plans to buy the shares it does not already own in BSkyB. I know that colleagues on all sides of this House and the public at home feel very concerned at the prospect of the organisation which allegedly allowed these terrible things to happen being allowed to take control of what would become Britain’s biggest media company.</p> <p>I understand that in the last few minutes News Corporation have withdrawn their Undertakings in Lieu.</p> <p>On <a href="/news/ministers_speeches/7741.aspx">January 25th</a> I said I was minded to refer News Corporation’s proposed merger with BSkyB to the Competition Commission in the absence of any specific undertakings in lieu.</p> <p>As a result of News Corporation’s announcement this afternoon I am now going to refer this to the Competition Commission with immediate effect and will be writing to them this afternoon.</p> <p>Today’s announcement will be an outcome that I am sure the whole house will welcome.</p> <p>It will mean that the Competition Commission will be able to give further full and exhaustive consideration of this merger taking into account all relevant recent developments.</p> <p>Mr Speaker, protecting our tradition of a strong, free and independent media is the most sacred responsibility I have as Culture Secretary. Irresponsible, illegal and callous behaviour damages that freedom by weakening public support for the self-regulation upon which it has thrived. By dealing decisively with the abuses of power we have seen, hopefully on a cross-party basis, this government intends to strengthen and not diminish press freedom, making this country once again proud and not ashamed of the journalism that so shapes our democracy.<br><br>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8285.aspx Jeremy Hunt Oral statement: NewsCorp/BSkyB merger update uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 11/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Monday 4 July 2011<br>Whitechapel Gallery, London</p> <p>Today is a slightly daunting anniversary for me. In my first speech as Culture Secretary last year, I quoted Grayson Perry speaking about the 10,000 hours it takes to achieve excellence in any field.<br><br>He might want to revise that to 20, 30 or 40,000 hours in my case because as of today, I have actually been doing this job for…10,000 hours.<br><br>George Osborne and I both have Grayson Perrys hanging in our offices, courtesy of the wonderful Government Art Collection.  Mine is called “Map of Nowhere” and is full of cryptic comments that taunt me on a daily basis. Like the man whispering in the Roman Emperor’s ear, one comment reads: “Got above ourselves have we?” Another warns me to avoid “catastrophic optimism.” Yet another of “the sadness of the excessively logical”.<br><br>So, avoiding Grayson’s elephant traps, what I want to do today is reflect back on the last year and see what lessons can be learned going forward.</p> <p><br></p> <p></p> <p>…and many, many more.<br><br>Gifts of different sizes, delivered in different ways, often for different reasons. <br><br>All of them showing the same, shared responsibility – as Lloyd Dorfman put it – “to lead from the front” in protecting what the arts and culture bring to our lives. <br><br>I’m hugely grateful to them all.<br><br>I am particularly grateful to one person in particular who has championed philanthropy long before it was a glimmer in any politician’s eye – Prince Charles. <br><br>Through the Prince of Wales Medal for Arts Philanthropy and his wider support for the arts, he’s done a huge amount to recognise the public spirited generosity of many cultural benefactors.</p> <p><br></p> <p><br></p> <p><br></p> <p></p> <p><br></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8270.aspx Jeremy Hunt The Endowment Century uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 04/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport Whitechapel Gallery, London
<p>Thursday 30 June 2011</p> <p><strong>The Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (Mr Jeremy Hunt):  </strong>I am today publishing the results of the consultation on the undertakings in lieu I launched on 3 March alongside the subsequent advice I have received from Ofcom and the OFT.   The consultation did not produce any information which has caused Ofcom and the OFT to change their earlier advice to me. I could have decided to accept the original undertakings.  However a number of constructive changes have been suggested, and as a result, I am today publishing a revised, more robust set of undertakings and will be consulting on them until midday Friday 8 July.</p> <p>As previously, I was not required to involve independent regulators in assessing the revised undertakings.  However I have again done so, and sought their independent advice. I am today also publishing that advice, which after careful consideration I have decided to accept.</p> <p></p> <p>I received over 40,000 representations to this consultation, including a very large number of near-identical responses as a result of internet campaigns.  I have placed summaries of the main responses on the DCMS website.  I met representatives from Trinity Mirror, Guardian Media Group, Telegraph Media Group, Associated News and Media, and Slaughter and May on 24 March and met Avaaz on 15 April.  Notes of meetings will be published at the end of the process.</p> <p>The substantive points have been carefully considered by me, advised by the independent regulators.  </p> <p></p> <p>These documents have been reviewed in great detail by OFT, Ofcom and external lawyers.   I believe that their independent, expert advice provides confidence that the undertakings and key Agreements are robust.  They have concluded that the drafts of the Carriage Agreement and the Brand Licence Agreement are now fully consistent with the proposed undertakings.  In addition, OFT confirm that the terms of the Carriage Agreement and Brand Licensing Agreement mean that Sky News will be practically and financially viable for the lifetime of the carriage agreement.  I can now therefore confirm that I am satisfied with both Agreements and am able to approve them in line with the requirement in the undertakings.  I will not be publishing these Agreements given the nature and the extent of the commercially confidential material they contain.</p> <p></p> <p><em><strong>Editorial Independence<br></strong></em>A number of changes have now been made to the undertakings to strengthen further the arrangements for editorial independence:</p> <p><strong><em>Business viability<br></em></strong>Some representations were made about Sky News’ continued financially viability.  I consider that Sky News’ financial viability is adequately secured through the Carriage and Brand Licensing Agreements.  However, in the light of representations received in response to the consultation exercise, I am proposing to modify the undertakings to ensure that Sky continues to cross-promote Sky News on its channels to a level and in a manner comparable with such cross-promotion for the period of 12 months prior to the date on which the undertakings are accepted.  This is important to ensure that Sky News continues to enjoy the same promotional support as the current business.  </p> <p>Also, the Monitoring Trustee will provide advice to me in my review of the key operational agreements requiring my approval to ensure that they are fair and reasonable.</p> <p><em><strong>Articles of Association<br></strong></em>Because so many of the safeguards are contained in the Articles of Association, including the requirement that Sky News’ services will abide by the principle of editorial independence and integrity in news reporting, the undertakings have been amended so that I have to approve them.  Furthermore, News Corp has offered an additional undertaking not to attempt to cause Sky News to act in breach of its Articles of Association.  A copy has been published along with the consultation document and the revised undertakings.  </p> <p>These are the main changes.  All the changes are set out in the published revised undertakings, and a more detailed explanation of the reasons for the changes is included in the consultation document and OFT’s report.   In my view, they provide a further layer of very important safeguards.  As amended, I believe that the undertakings will remedy, mitigate, or prevent the threats to plurality which were identified at the start of this process.  I therefore propose to accept the undertakings in lieu of a reference to the Competition Commission.   </p> <p>I have today placed on my Department’s website a revised version of the undertakings and an associated consultation document.  There will now be a final consultation period starting today and ending at midday on Friday 8 July.  During this time all interested parties will be able to express their views on the revised undertakings.   </p> <p>Once again I will seek the advice of Ofcom and the OFT on any responses to this consultation.  As expert regulators they are best placed to thoroughly understand the issues and to offer comprehensive and impartial advice.  Once I have considered these representations and the independent regulators’ advice, I will reach a decision on whether I still consider that the undertakings should still be accepted in lieu of a reference to the Competition Commission.  If, after the consultation, I remain of the view that the undertakings properly address the concerns about media plurality, I will accept them and not refer this merger to the Competition Commission.  </p> <p>I am required to publish the revised undertakings in Lieu and an explanation as to why I have made the proposed changes, and I have done so.  In the interests of transparency I have also published a number of other documents where there is no legal requirement upon me to do so.  These are: the advice I have received from OFT and Ofcom; the Articles of Association of Sky News; and a summary of responses to the consultation process.  The Carriage Agreement and the Brand Licence Agreement have not been published given the nature and the extent of the commercially confidential material they contain.I hope that this openness will help strengthen public confidence in the process and decision.  </p> <p></p> <p>A number of respondents raised competition issues.  In addition to the fact that this could not be considered as part of the media plurality public interest test, these issues have already been considered by the European Commission which concluded on 21 December last year that the increased shareholding would not significantly impede effective competition. </p> <p>Some respondents also argued that News Corp could not be relied upon to abide by the requirements set out in the undertakings, citing previous guarantees and assurances given by News in the past, and the current phone hacking allegations against The News of the World.  </p> <p>I have taken the view that News have offered serious undertakings and discussed them in good faith.  In all the circumstances and given that the implementation of those undertakings will be overseen by the Monitoring Trustee and thereafter monitored and if necessary enforced by the OFT, I believe that there are sufficient safeguards to ensure compliance with the undertakings.  Furthermore, the various agreements entered into pursuant to the undertakings will each be enforceable contracts.  Therefore whilst the phone hacking allegations are very serious they were not material to my consideration.</p> <p>I would also like to draw attention to a point stressed by Ofcom in its report.  Namely, that the undertakings must be assessed against the fact that the plurality concerns arose out of a change in the degree of control News Corporation has over Sky.  The undertakings do not and should not seek to establish Sky News in a position where News Corporation has no relationship with it at all, because today News Corporation controls 37.19% of Sky’s voting shares.   </p> <p>I am committed to maintaining the free and independent press for which this country is famous.     I have sought and published independent advice throughout this process.  I have listened carefully to points made in the consultation and amended the undertakings where appropriate.  I have also gone for maximum transparency whilst taking reasonable account of commercial confidentiality considerations.    I continue to believe that, if I allow this deal to proceed, Sky News will be able to continue its high-quality output and in fact will have greater protections for its operational and editorial independence than those that exist today.</p> <p>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8262.aspx Jeremy Hunt Written Ministerial Statement: NewsCorp/BSkyB merger uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 30/06/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Thursday 3 March 2011</p> <p><strong>The Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (Mr Jeremy Hunt): </strong>With permission, Mr Speaker, I should like to make a statement about News Corporation's proposed acquisition of BSkyB. I start by thanking both the Office of Fair Trading and Ofcom for their detailed, thorough and independent analysis, which has been produced to a challenging time scale. My decision today relates to the plurality of news provision, not competition or market power issues, which were ruled on by the European Commission on 21 December 2010.</p> <p>Earlier this morning, I announced that the independent media regulator, Ofcom, had advised me that undertakings in lieu offered by News Corporation would address the plurality concerns that Ofcom had identified in its report to me of 31 December 2010. I also announced that the OFT considered the undertakings to be practically and financially viable for up to 10 years. In the light of this independent advice, I propose to accept such undertakings instead of referring the matter to the Competition Commission.</p> <p>As the Enterprise Act 2002 requires, I have today published these undertakings for public consultation. For the sake of transparency, I have also published all the advice that I have received from Ofcom and the OFT, together with correspondence between myself and News Corporation and a time line for the process I have followed, including details of all meetings I have held. I hope that hon. Members will have time to study these undertakings during the formal consultation that will start today. However, it may help if I outline the main points.</p> <p>The undertakings would ensure that Sky News is spun off as an independent public limited company. The shares in that company would be distributed among the existing shareholders of BSkyB in line with their existing shareholdings. News Corp would therefore retain a 39.1% stake in the new company, although it will not be allowed to increase this shareholding for 10 years without the Secretary of State's permission. In other words, even if the proposed News Corp/Sky merger goes ahead, News Corp's shareholding in Sky News will remain the same as at present.</p> <p>The new company would have a 10-year carriage agreement and a seven-year renewable brand licensing agreement with the newly merged News Corp/Sky so as to ensure its financial viability. Unlike the board to which Sky News currently reports, the chairman would be required to be an independent director. Unlike at present, the board would have a corporate governance and editorial committee to ensure compliance with the principles of editorial independence and integrity in news reporting. For the first time, the requirement for the company to adhere to Ofcom's broadcasting code would be enshrined in the new company's articles of association.</p> <p>In short, the editorial independence of Sky News will be better protected not only than it would have been had Sky News formed part of the buy-out of Sky shares, but even than it is right now. The principles of the arrangements are clear and set out in the proposed undertakings. There are still some detailed provisions of carriage, brand licensing and certain operational agreements that need to be finalised, and the terms ensure that such agreements need to be approved by me. In deciding whether or not to approve them, I will again take the advice of Ofcom and the OFT as appropriate. The merger cannot, of course, go ahead until I have been satisfied on all these matters.</p> <p>I also want to draw the House's attention to the long-term sustainability of these undertakings. The OFT has said that the undertakings are likely to be practically and financially viable in the short and medium term, but expressed concerns about whether they would be viable over the longer term. It stated, however, that the appropriate time frame in this market was for me to decide, with Ofcom's advice.</p> <p>Ofcom has considered the impact of a 10-year carriage agreement in the context of the media industry, and it has expressed the view that, in a rapidly changing media and technological environment, a carriage agreement of 10 years is a long-term measure. I agree with its independent view about the difficulties of predicting with any certainty how the plurality issues will develop over a longer time frame. However, I will of course reach a final conclusion on that and other aspects of the undertakings only after the consultation is complete.</p> <p>Consequently, on the basis of the independent advice I have received, I have concluded that a referral to the Competition Commission would not be merited at this stage, and instead I propose to consult on the undertakings in lieu, the final version of which has also been placed in the Libraries of both Houses and on my Department's website.</p> <p>In line with the legislation, I am opening a consultation period, during which time all interested parties will be able to express their views on the undertakings. Once I have considered representations, I will reach a decision on whether I still believe that the undertakings should be accepted in lieu of a referral. If, after consultation, I am still of the view that the undertakings address the concerns about media plurality, I will accept them and not refer the merger to the Competition Commission.</p> <p>I should add that, quite separately to my consideration of the merger, I have carefully noted Ofcom's point that there is a potential weakness in the current public interest test with respect to media plurality-namely, that it can be applied only when there is a commercial transaction to consider. That wider question is one that I intend to consider in the context of the forthcoming review of communications regulation which I announced earlier this year.</p> <p>Throughout the process, I have been very aware of the potential controversy surrounding the merger. Nothing is more precious to me than the free and independent press for which this country is famous the world over. In order to reassure the public about the way in which the decision has been taken, I have sought and published independent advice at every step of the way, even when not required to by law. After careful consideration, I have followed that independent advice. The result is that, if the deal goes ahead, Sky News will be able to continue its high-quality output with greater protections for its operational and editorial independence than those that exist today. For those people who have concerns about the plurality of news provision, I hope that that will be a welcome step forward. As such, I commend this statement to the House.</p> <p>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7909.aspx Jeremy Hunt Oral Statement: News Corporation's proposed acquisition of BSkyB uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 03/03/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Wednesday 16 February 2011</p> <p></p> <p>On 1 November 2010 the Chairman of the Horserace Betting Levy Board (‘the HBLB’) informed me that the HBLB had been unable to approve a recommendation from the Bookmakers’ Committee as to the terms of the 50th Levy Scheme. Under section 1(2) of the Horserace Betting Levy Act 1969, therefore, it falls to me to determine those terms.</p> <p>I have considered the parties’ submissions, taking into account their representations on what target amount would reflect the capacity of bookmakers to pay, what it is reasonable to expect bookmakers to pay and what the reasonable needs of horseracing are in all the circumstances. </p> <p>Under section 1(3)(a) of the Act, I have decided to determine a new Levy Scheme for the 50th Levy Period (running from April 2011 to March 2012), under which the following terms will apply:</p> <p>I estimate that this will produce Levy proceeds of between £73.7m - £80.8m (with a mid-range figure of £77.25m), and believe that terms outlined above represent a fair deal for Bookmakers and Horseracing.</p> <p>I am today writing to the Bookmakers’ Committee, British Horseracing and the Government-Appointed Members of the HBLB to thank them for their submissions and explain my decision in more detail. I will also ask that the HBLB finalise the operational details of the scheme as a matter of urgency.</p> <p>With the determination concluded, I would like to re-state my disappointment that the relevant parties were not themselves able to come to terms and I would strongly encourage them to develop a less adversarial relationship going forward. I have tried to be fair by listening to the advice of the Independent members of the Levy Board and I will continue to be guided by their advice in future years until what should be a straightforward commercial negotiation can be taken permanently out of the hands of Ministers.  </p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7860.aspx Jeremy Hunt Written Ministerial Statement: 50th Horserace Betting Levy uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 16/02/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Wednesday 9 February 2011<br>Telford Sport College Conference</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>On their behalf I want to thank each and every one of you.<br><br>There was yet another reminder of the power of sport a few weeks ago, when Newsround asked young people to nominate their favourite role models and post them online.<br><br>You can probably guess some of the names that came up  – Cheryl Cole, Justin Bieber, Emma Watson – but there were two things that I found striking.<br><br>First, the number of children who chose sporting role models – people like David Beckham, Rebecca Adlington, and Tom Daley – and who talked about how much they admired them for their dedication and hard work.<br><br>Second, the number of children who nominated not celebrities but the people who support and inspire them every day: their teachers, headteachers, and coaches – exactly those roles that many of you perform or inspire others to perform.<br><br><strong></strong></p> <p><br>Why do we value school sport? Let me give you my top five reasons.<br><br>Firstly because regularly taking part in physical activity brings huge benefits in terms of health and wellbeing. <br><br>Secondly because with more than 1 in 7 children classed as obese, sport is a vital part of the drive against childhood obesity.<br><br>Thirdly because participation in sport has been proven to reduce the chances that at-risk teenagers will commit anti-social behaviour.<br><br>Fourthly because organised physical activity helps to boost concentration and feeds through directly into improved academic performance.<br><br>And last but not least because competitive sport in particular prepares people for life in a way that little else comes close to. <br><br>It helps young people develop confidence, the inner confidence that comes from stretching yourself to the limit and achieving what you never thought possible.<br><br>It teaches you teamwork and the notion of an identity that extends beyond ourselves as individuals.<br>And it teaches you to win with grace, yes, but also to lose with dignity. And in today’s highly competitive world, learning to lose is equally as important as learning to win. </p> <p>Shakespeare said: “Sweet are the uses of adversity.” But I never forget Churchill who said that “success is the ability to go from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm”.<br><br>Quite a useful saying for politicians to memorise…<br><br><strong></strong></p> <p><br>It was the founder of the modern Olympics, Pierre de Coubertin, who said: “The important thing in life is not the victory but the contest; the essential thing is not to have won but to have fought well”.<br><br>And it will be our new School Games tournament – inspired by the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics – that will be at the heart of our new approach to competitive sport.<br><br>Of course, we are not starting from scratch. Thanks to you, there are already plenty of great examples of strong, well-developed competitions for children and young people. <br><br>Not least the UK School Games – where I enjoyed meeting many of you in Gateshead last year.<br><br>We want to build on this success rather than replicate it, and to do so in a way that allows every child the chance to take part, compete, and discover their hidden talents.<br><br>We want to do it with a new tournament that will help drive up interest in competitive sport right where it matters most – within schools themselves.<br><br>And we want to set this up in time for the Olympic and Paralympic Games as a key part of the sporting legacy they will leave behind. <br><br>Because this is not about a one-off event in 2012, but about what happens each and every year from now on.<br><br>Starting this academic year, all schools will have the chance to hold an annual <em>School Games Day </em>– the culmination of a broad-ranging programme of intra-school competition.<br><br>We expect around 500 schools to pilot a School Games Day this year, with a national roll-out in time for 2012.<br><br>And our goal is that these will be different – and better – than current school sports days. <br><br>Indeed our ambitions for the School Games are so high that some schools may not initially be willing to make the commitment to be part of them. <br><br>But let me give you three specific ways in which we want them to be a transformational shift:<br><br>Firstly we want each School Games Day not to be a “one off” event, but the finals of a broader programme of competitive intra-school sport taking place throughout the school year.<br><br>Secondly, drawing on the inspiration of the 2012 Paralympics, we want to make sure that this is a scheme that will offer disabled children as many opportunities as non-disabled children.<br><br>And thirdly, drawing on the nationwide festival of culture that will accompany London 2012, we want every School Games to have a cultural element.<br><br>Opening and closing ceremonies, for example, that could involve the school band or orchestra. </p> <p>At the next level – what we call Level 2 - there will be a rolling programme of leagues and tournaments promoting more competition between schools at a town or district level.<br><br>As a former Shadow Minister for Disabled People, I am very proud of the fact that, for many areas, this will be the first time there has been an inter-school Paralympic-style competition in their area.<br><br>I had a chance to discuss this with some of you last night, and I was enormously impressed by your commitment to seizing this opportunity to take a huge step forward for the disability agenda.<br><br>From there, the most successful children and young people will progress to Level 3: <br><br>Up to 60 new, county or city-level ‘Festivals of Sport’ that will showcase the best of local competitive sport in the inter-school finals.<br><br>We will be piloting this in nine regions this summer: London, Manchester, and Lincolnshire, North Yorkshire, Cornwall and the Black Country, Hertfordshire, Kent and Tyne and Wear.<br><br>Finally – at level 4 – the most talented young sports people will have the chance to represent their schools in a high-profile, national event. <br><br>In the long term, this event will take place in September. <br><br>But next year we want to offer these young sports people the chance to compete in the brand new Olympic Park – even ahead of the athletes themselves.<br><br>That’s why the first national final will take place in May – precisely the moment when we can give your efforts the highest profile in the run up to the opening ceremony on July 27th.<br><br>By doing this we can create a direct link between the achievements of our most promising young athletes at the School Games and the achievements of Team GB in the Olympics and Paralympics. <br>And use their example to inspire all schoolchildren with the excitement and benefits of competitive sport.<br><br>I look forward to working together to create a fantastic legacy for young people through the School Games.<br><br>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7818.aspx Jeremy Hunt School Games uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 09/02/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport Telford Sport College Conference
<p>Tuesday 25 January 2011</p> <p><strong>Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (Rt. Hon Jeremy Hunt): </strong></p> <p>On 3 November 2010 News Corporation notified the European Commission of its intention to acquire the shares in BSkyB that it does not already own. On 4 November 2010 the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills issued a European intervention notice in relation to the proposed acquisition. He asked Ofcom to investigate and report back to him by 31 December 2010 providing advice and recommendations on the public interest consideration in section 58 of the Enterprise Act 2002. This public interest consideration concerns the sufficiency of plurality of persons with control of media enterprises. </p> <p>On 21 December 2010 the European Commission cleared the proposed acquisition of BSkyB by News Corporation. The Commission concluded that the transaction would not significantly impede effective competition in the European Economic Area or any substantial part of it.  The Commission made it clear that its decision did not prejudice my jurisdiction in relation to the merger’s impact on the separate question of sufficiency of plurality in the media.<br>Following receipt of Ofcom’s report and in the interests of transparency I want to inform the House of the timeline and process that I have followed to date in my considerations of the relevant public interest. </p> <p>As such I am today publishing the following documents, copies of which will also be deposited in the Libraries of both Houses:</p> <p>All documents are available from the <a href="http://www.culture.gov.uk/publications/7737.aspx">publication section of the DCMS website</a>.<br><br>After careful consideration of the Ofcom Report which recommends referral to the Competition Commission, and as provided by section 104 of the Enterprise Act 2002 that sets out my duty to consult adversely affected parties, I met with News Corporation on 6 January to set out the process that I would follow and briefly explain Ofcom’s conclusions. Having informed them of the process I then wrote to News Corporation and BSkyB on 7 January enclosing a copy of Ofcom’s Report. In this letter I explained that I was minded to refer the case to the Competition Commission but that I would receive written, and if necessary oral, representations from them if they wanted to challenge my thinking. </p> <p>On 10 January I met with Ofcom to seek clarification on a number of aspects of their report. </p> <p>In response to my letter of 7 January BSkyB and News Corporation provided written representations challenging elements of Ofcom’s report on 13 and 14 January respectively. </p> <p>These documents have today been published. After considering these responses and consistent with section 104 of the Enterprise Act I therefore met again with News Corporation on 20 January to hear representations on the issues they highlighted. </p> <p>As a result of these meetings and my consideration of the Ofcom report and subsequent submissions from the parties involved I still intend to refer the merger to the Competition Commission.  On the evidence available, I consider that it may be the case that the merger may operate against the public interest in media plurality. </p> <p>However, before doing so it is right that I consider any undertakings in lieu offered by any merging party which have the potential to prevent or otherwise mitigate the potential threats to media plurality identified in the Ofcom report.  </p> <p>News Corporation says that it wishes me to consider undertakings in lieu which it contends could sufficiently alleviate the concerns I have such that I should accept the undertakings instead of making a reference.  It is appropriate for me to consider such undertakings.  In considering whether to accept undertakings in lieu, I will ask the OFT under section 93 of the Enterprise Act 2002 as an expert public body with experience in negotiating undertakings in lieu to be involved in the process from this stage. I will also ask Ofcom under section 106B for advice whether undertakings in lieu address the potential impact on media plurality.  </p> <p>If this process produces undertakings in lieu which I believe will prevent or otherwise mitigate the merger from having effects adverse to the public interest, and which I propose to accept, I will then publish the undertakings in lieu and (as required under the Act) begin a formal 15 day consultation period during which time all interested parties will be able to express their views. </p> <p>It is in the nature of this process that I cannot give clear dates for each step as we move forward. My main concern is not to work to an arbitrary timetable but to ensure that I reach my decision in a fair and even-handed way which is transparent and ensures that all concerns are properly considered.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7741.aspx Jeremy Hunt Written Ministerial Statement: Media Ownership uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 25/01/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Wednesday 19 January 2011<br>Oxford Media Convention, Oxford</p> <p><strong></strong></p> <p>H.G.Wells said, “Adapt or perish, now as ever, is nature’s inexorable imperative”.<br><br>Our media sector knows this well.<br><br>We are having to adapt to a pace of change that would have been unthinkable only 20 years ago.<br><br>Back then, there was no world wide web. Today 70% of UK households subscribe to broadband and 30 million use the internet every day.<br><br>15 years ago Google was nothing more than a research project for two students at Stanford. Today it’s the country’s most popular site across every single age group.<br><br>10 years ago there was no <em>Facebook</em> and no mobile internet. Now we all clutch our mobiles on the go, with <em>Facebook</em> accounting for half of the time we spend using them online.<br><br>And 5 years ago there was no <em>Twitter</em>. Today the Iranian authorities consider it a threat to their regime – a force for freedom that even the most hardened cold war warriors could not have predicted. <br><br>The UK media sector – responsible for some of the most vibrant newspapers and highest quality television in the world – is right in the eye of this storm. <br><br>Get it right now and our economy, our democracy and our country will emerge stronger and more successful than ever. <br><br>Get it wrong and a great British industry could be destroyed.<br><strong></strong></p> <p><br>But despite the warning, my message today is that we have a real platform for success. <br><br>We are the largest creator of digital content in Europe – by some measures the largest in the world.<br><br>Our digital and ICT sectors now contribute 10% of our GDP. Our creative industries are on track to grow at double the rate of the wider economy in the years ahead.<br><br>And when it comes to e-commerce, we are the nation with the highest per capita spending online anywhere. <br><br>We punch well above our weight. And not, may I say, with any particular thanks to the government. <br><br>Rather it is the energy, enthusiasm and passion of countless creative pioneers and entrepreneurs who have driven forward this success story.<br><br>As John Gardner put it, “The best thing we can do for creative people is to stand out of their light”.<br><br>Let me highlight two key trends that I believe will come to define the success of our digital and creative industries in the years ahead.<br><strong></strong></p> <p><br>But here’s the irony. Just as technology drives globalisation, it also drives localisation. And consumers want both.<br><br>Look at how Mappa Mercia’s gritting map helped local communities in December’s snow. <br><br>It allowed people from all over Birmingham, Walsall and Solihull to plan their Christmas journeys by checking which roads had been gritted. <br><br>Or sites like <em>MyTunstall</em> in Stoke-on-Trent which encouraged local people to band together to help clear roads and pathways and make it easier for everyone to travel around. <br><br>Or the hyperlocal blogs that covered everything from school closures to the disruption of rubbish collection services. <br>It is easy to be patronising about these hyperlocal services. But take a look at the evidence about what consumers truly value.<br><br>8 out of 10 people in this country consider local news important.<br><br>‘Focus on the local area’ is consistently ranked as a high priority. And nearly 7 out of 10 adults feel that the ‘localness’ of stories is more important than them being professionally produced.<br><br>Our vision of a connected, big society is one in which we really do value the local as much as the national or international.<br>And local television is one area – perhaps the only area – in which our outstandingly successful media sector has been outstandingly unsuccessful in responding to consumer needs. <br><br>The painful truth is that we probably have one of the most centralised media ecologies of any developed country.<br><br>Think about Sheffield, Bristol, or Birmingham – all major cities that don’t have a single local TV station between them. <br><br>What is good enough for Dublin or Galway, Lyon or Marseille, Catalonia or Calgary, is certainly good enough for them. <br><br>And if we want to be the best, we should settle for no less.<br><strong></strong></p> <p>There is much work to do to make this happen. <br><br>Despite the economic crisis, Government have not wasted any time.<br><br>We have responded to the need to have world-class infrastructure in place by announcing a detailed action plan for building the best superfast broadband network in Europe.<br><br>Our ambition is that every community in the country should have access to a fibre point – rather like the old village well.<br><br>And to make it happen we have increased the amount of public investment committed to this from £200m when we came into office to £830m. <br><br>We have announced a second wave of superfast rural broadband projects – to add to those in Cumbria, North Yorkshire, Herefordshire and the Highlands.<br><br>We have launched plans for an East London Tech City as part of the Olympic legacy. <br><br>We have worked with Ofcom on plans for opening up BT’s existing infrastructure to other investors.<br><br>And we are working with both the utility and telecoms sectors to find ways of bringing down the costs of investing in new, fibre-optic networks.<br><br>But as well as world-class infrastructure, we know that we also need a world-class regulatory regime. One that encourages investment in creativity, quality and choice.<br>And an innovation-friendly environment for intellectual property that protects the rights of creators without preserving current business models in aspic.<br><strong></strong></p> <p><br>That’s for the longer term. But there’s one problem that we’re not prepared to wait any longer to put right – namely the lack of opportunities for local voices in our broadcasting sector.<br><br>So the second thing I am launching today is an Action Plan for Local Media – building upon the excellent report that Nicholas Shott produced last month to help us understand how local TV can be commercially viable in the UK.<br><br>Let me take this opportunity to thank Nicholas and his panel for the extraordinarily thorough work they did.<br>Their report explains clearly how, in the longer term, IPTV offers vast potential for the distribution of local television services. So any local TV solution will need to offer a smooth glide path to that IPTV future.<br><br>Our vision – recommended by the Shott report and broadly supported by Ofcom analysis – is to start with a network affiliate model based around a new, network DTT channel with guaranteed opt-outs for local services.<br><br>And to make this vision a reality I am today inviting existing and new media providers to come forward with suggestions as to how this network channel – or local TV “spine” – could work.<br><br>At the same time, we will implement a new licensing regime to foster the creation of local TV services whose output will be carried on this new channel. <br><br>And we will be looking to secure multiplex capacity for it, as well as prominence in the electronic programme guides.<br><br>What this will mean for consumers is a new channel dedicated to the provision of local news and content. <br><br>One that will sit alongside other public service broadcasters, offering a new voice for local communities, with local perspectives that are directly relevant to them.<br><br>So I am inviting all potential providers to register their interest with my department by March 1st – with the formal process scheduled to begin early this summer.<br><br>In the initial DTT phase, Nicholas Shott’s report talked about local TV being viable in 10-15 of the UK’s major cities. Greg Dyke has recently said that he believes the potential to be much greater. <br><br>I want to allow the market, not ministers, to resolve this question.<br><br>So we will not be prescriptive. We will wait for the necessary technical assessment to be completed and we will listen to the commercially-viable proposals that come forward.<br><br>Our goal is to be able to award the relevant licences by the end of 2012, and for local TV to be up and running soon after. <strong></strong></p> <p><br>Shakespeare wrote, “We know what we are, we know not what we may be”. <br><br>Dare I say that Clay Shirky put it better more recently when he said: “That is what real revolutions are like. The old stuff gets broken faster than the new stuff is put in its place”.<br><br>All we can do is remind ourselves that our success in the past has come when we have faced up to change and not run away from it.<br><br>We cannot possibly know what that success will look like in ten years time. <br><br>But we can be sure that it will depend on taking what we do well, and using it to do what we have never done before.</p> <p>[ENDS]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7726.aspx Jeremy Hunt Oxford Media Convention uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 19/01/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport Oxford Media Convention, Oxford
<p>Wednesday 8 December 2010<br>European Association for Philanthropy &amp; Giving conference, London</p> <p><strong></strong></p> <p>I want to start by addressing the biggest challenge I face when it comes to the philanthropy agenda.</p> <p>Namely, to explode the myth that it is simply a response to cuts in arts funding.</p> <p>“There’s no money in the till so go out and raise it yourselves”.  Or, as Norman Tebbit might say: “Get on your bike and start busking.”</p> <p>Nothing could be further from the truth. </p> <p>I remember the first meeting I had with Peter Hewitt – Alan Davey’s predecessor at the Arts Council – when I had just become Shadow Culture Secretary. </p> <p>It was summer 2007, and neither of us had the slightest premonition of the financial crisis to come.</p> <p>Isn’t there an opportunity, I asked him, to turn philanthropy into a tap that could support the arts as effectively as the National Lottery?</p> <p>It was a theme I returned to in my very first speech to the arts world back in the summer of 2008 – again, months before Lehmans filed for bankruptcy.</p> <p>Then I set out the core principles of our approach to arts funding – principles which have not changed.</p> <p></p> <p>Instead it is about a highly ambitious aim for this country to combine the best of US-style philanthropic support with the best of European-style public support.</p> <p>Nor is it about importing a US model wholesale into the UK. </p> <p>Over-dependence on endowments has been as dangerous to cultural organisations there as over-dependence on state support is here.</p> <p>But surely we must ask ourselves what we can learn from a country in which cultural giving per capita is £37 a year compared to just £6 in the UK? <br><br>The best model for financing the arts – one that secures not just financial independence but artistic independence too – is one in which cultural organisations can count on a plurality and diversity of funding sources.</p> <p></p> <p>The cultural environment in this country is one of huge complexity. </p> <p>Many great London cultural organisations depend for their talent on community arts groups in the provinces, while many regional arts organisations rely in turn on the major talent generators of the capital.</p> <p>Smaller or more regional organisations may not be able to raise money in the same way or in the same quantities as major metropolitan institutions. Yet the two types of organisation are inextricably linked – in a way that is crucial to the overall health of the sector.</p> <p>So today I will be announcing plans to help the whole range of cultural organisations – and to address their distinct needs in a carefully tailored way.</p> <p></p> <p>Philanthropy is as beneficial to the donor as to the recipient and should be recognised as such.</p> <p>I experienced this myself through the small charity I co-founded before I came into politics – one that operates on a tiny scale but has nevertheless given me more pride than anything else I have done.</p> <p>Vernon Ellis talked about the same feeling when he was asked about the incredible support he has given to the English National Opera over the years.</p> <p>He said that the joy and satisfaction that comes with seeing the results of an investment like that is something that keeps getting greater and greater.</p> <p>Shakespeare said “The object of art is to give life a shape”, so what could be more rewarding than being instrumental to that process right at the start?</p> <p>But let me tell you something else – something rather more disappointing.</p> <p>As a proportion of their income, the wealthiest people in this country give far less than those who are less well-off. </p> <p>In the US those who earn more than £150,000 give eight times more than those in the UK.</p> <p>And three-fifths of Britain’s biggest donors – those giving more than £100 a month – have incomes of less than £26,000 per year.</p> <p>In other words, the people who give the most are often the people who have the least. </p> <p>The kind of people whose £5 or £10 donations helped to save the Staffordshire Hoard earlier this year.  </p> <p>Or young people like Matthew Hughes – the schoolboy who raided his piggybank to help the nation acquire a Turner watercolour.  </p> <p>These people are valued philanthropists, every one. But those who are better off have a particular responsibility. </p> <p>Because a society in which the wealthy are more generous is one where the relationship between haves and have-nots is transformed from resentment to mutual dependence. </p> <p>A stronger society and a bigger one too.</p> <p> </p> <p>Philanthropic sentiments are not new in this country – they have a very proud tradition particularly within the arts.</p> <p>The British Museum, founded on the legacy of Sir Hans Sloane. The British Library on a royal gift.</p> <p>The Royal Ballet, the National Theatre, and the English National Opera, all with their roots in the charity of Lilian Bayliss. </p> <p>The 17 libraries and three museums that John Passmore Edwards gave to London. </p> <p>And not just in London either. </p> <p>Think of the many world-class museums, galleries and collections around the country that are inextricably linked with the names of individual supporters: from Whitworth to Hunter, Burrell to Bowes.1</p> <p>Or the 600 public libraries in Britain and Ireland that Andrew Carnegie helped to create. <br><br>In fact, of the 95 different donors who made gifts over £1 million last year, 27 were based in English regions outside London – regions which received more than £42 million from individual donors. </p> <p>The is a 4% increase even despite the recession, which only shows how great the potential for philanthropy is right around the country.</p> <p>And within this, the potential for cultural philanthropy.</p> <p>Like Dennis Arbon’s incredible support for The Hall for Cornwall in Truro, for example.</p> <p>Or the contribution that Anita Bhalla has made to the Midlands Art Centre in Edgbaston. </p> <p>Or the role of The Joyce Fletcher Charitable Trust and of Andrew Fletcher in supporting the Bath Festivals and the Theatre Royal.</p> <p></p> <p>Last year cultural organisations raised £655 million from private sector supporters. That is no mean sum, but still overall the arts receive less than 3% of all charitable giving.</p> <p>According to Colin Tweedy and Arts and Business – and let me here salute the work that organisation has done in this area for many years - if we had raised an equivalent percentage to that raised in the US, an extra £106m would have gone into the arts. </p> <p>We need to develop our fundraising skills and capacity right across the sector. And to do this we need to learn from those who do it best. </p> <p></p> <p>I am delighted Alan [Davey] and Carole [Souter] are here today, because over £80 million in public funding will come from the Lottery and DCMS.</p> <p>By leveraging an equivalent amount from private donors, our investment will unlock at least £160 million for cultural organisations over the next four years – but with Gift Aid and smart targeting it could raise even more.</p> <p>It’s a fund that will be deployed in a range of ways to allow cultural organisations – large and small, London or regional – to access a scheme that suits them.</p> <p>Firstly it will help smaller organisations, some of which do not have even a basic fundraising capacity, to develop, and even finance, their ability to identify and cultivate donors.</p> <p>At the same time it will help larger cultural organisations outside London who probably do fundraising already but have always found it more challenging. We know how hard you try – this will give an added incentive to your donors to be generous.</p> <p>Finally, it will help our major established institutions too, offering them a chance to take the next big step for them, namely to set up world-class endowment funds.</p> <p>Today, Neil McGregor and Alan Davey are publishing their excellent reports on endowments. And the lesson is clear. </p> <p>This is not a short-term venture; not something that will make a huge difference to finances in the next few challenging years. </p> <p>But if it took the Met in New York over a century to build up its multi-billion dollar endowment, should we not start our endowment century now? </p> <p>We know that the British Museum, the Tate and the V&amp;A are not only world-class in the quality of their work but also in their ambition. </p> <p>So if they want to develop endowment funds I am ready to make match-funding available to help support and incentivise donations.  </p> <p>As the Chinese say, the journey of 1000 miles starts with one step. </p> <p>In a hundred years time I want people to look back and say that the multi-billion pound endowments owned by our national cultural organisations put their first roots in the ground back in 2010. </p> <p></p> <p>We know that there is a huge amount of frustration around the existing rules. </p> <p>But above all I recognise we cannot develop a meaningful strategy around philanthropy without listening to what you have to say on these issues and doing our very best to remove barriers to giving. </p> <p>Another area we will be examining is how to strengthen the way we recognise and care for our donors at every level. The act of saying ‘thank you’ is simple enough, but too often neglected. </p> <p>I am very much aware that Government and Ministers have a key part to play here – which is why one of my first acts as Culture Secretary was to write to 200 donors to say ‘thank you’ and to ask for their advice.<br> <br>Now I know that many people who give wish to maintain their privacy. </p> <p>But where donors are willing to be recognised – and celebrated as society’s role models – I believe they have a crucial part to play in encouraging their peers and helping to foster a wider culture of giving. </p> <p>As Tom Hughes-Hallett – the former financier and now Chief Executive of Marie Curie Cancer Care – has said: “we need to make people think that it is okay to tell the world they have given money, because then the peer pressure will begin to build”. </p> <p>So I welcome the independent review that Tom will be leading into ways in which we can further incentivise giving. </p> <p>Clearly there is a role for the honours system here. Which is why, as part of this plan, we are looking at how it could better recognise sustained giving at every level, not only amongst the most wealthy.</p> <p>Nor can we neglect corporate support – responsible for a quarter of private giving. </p> <p>So we have designated 2011 the Year of Corporate Philanthropy – with a series of events to boost corporate support planned throughout the year.<br> <br>Of course the motivation for many businesses is around marketing and branding rather than being philanthropic in its purest sense. </p> <p>But as long as it respects the independence and artistic integrity of the recipient, then of course we want to encourage it.</p> <p></p> <p>A plan that will form part of a wider, cross-government strategy on giving that we will publish in the spring.</p> <p>And a plan that proves that, even though the very nature of philanthropy puts the onus on the private sector, the Government is not prepared to just sit back and do nothing to make it happen.</p> <p>Instead we will play an active role in making sure that our sector can get the very most from the resources that are out there.   </p> <p>From encouraging legacy giving, to promoting the long-term development of endowments.<br> <br>From harnessing digital technologies, to cultivating giving from overseas donors.</p> <p>From getting better at saying ‘thanks’, to offering help to the smallest cultural organisations as well as the biggest, those in London as well as those further away. </p> <p>But I am under no illusions. All of this will take time. And it is a particularly challenging time for the cultural sector anyway.</p> <p>We want to see how much progress we can make within this parliament of course. But above all we are targeting a horizon shift: a generational change in the culture of giving that may be 10 or 20 years in the making.</p> <p>Not just more giving, but more effective giving, more planned giving, and more long-term relationships between the arts and their supporters.</p> <p>The sooner we start, the sooner we will get there. </p> <p>And the sooner cultural organisations in this country will be able to benefit fully from a society that truly believes in what Winston Churchill articulated at another time of austerity:</p> <p>“We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give”.</p> <p>[ENDS]<br><br>1 Sir Joseph Whitworth, Whitworth Gallery, Manchester; William Hunter, Huntarian Museum and Gallery, Glasgow; Sir William Burrell, Burrell Collection, Glasgow; John and Josephine Bowes, Bowes Museum, Co. Durham<br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7633.aspx Jeremy Hunt Philanthropy keynote speech uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 08/12/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport European Association for Philanthropy &amp; Giving conference, London
<p>Monday 6 December 2010, London<br>Speech to Reform</p> <p>A few weeks ago I was in Silicon Valley meeting with the CEOs of some of the world’s most innovative, high-tech companies.</p> <p>I remember talking to a partner in a venture capitalist firm that has successfully backed companies like Apple and Google, Pay Pal and YouTube.  </p> <p>He was in his late 40s, but he told me that the difference between Silicon Valley and Boston was that: “There they think only people over 25 are smart. Here we think it’s only people under 25”. </p> <p>We may have a young Prime Minister but the truth is that London and the UK weren’t even on his radar. </p> <p>It made me ask myself: what part does Britain want to play in the digital revolution? Do we want to be the perennial “first follower” to America? Or can we do better?</p> <p>I hope that, after six months, the government’s direction of travel on this is clear. </p> <p>Within a month of my appointment I set out our ambition to have the Europe’s best superfast broadband by 2015. </p> <p>Then we announced four rural superfast broadband pilots in the Highlands and Cumbria, Herefordshire and North Yorkshire. </p> <p>We settled the television licence fee in record time, increasing public investment in high speed broadband from £200 million to £830 million. </p> <p>And last month the Prime Minister unveiled our plans for a new Tech City in East London and the Olympic Park – with support from companies such as Google and Facebook, Intel and McKinsey. </p> <p>Today I want to put flesh on the bones of our ambitions. But first I want to explain why we believe that this agenda is so central to our strategy for economic growth.</p> <p>Back in October, David Cameron set out his plans to restore our economic dynamism.</p> <p>Anyone who has seen the film Social Network will not need reminding that we live in an age when companies with the smallest of investments can become global giants overnight. </p> <p>This world is not foreign territory for the UK. Our digital industries already generate 10% of our Gross Value Added – around £130 billion.</p> <p>They already employ around six per cent of the UK’s workforce – more than 1.7 million people.</p> <p>And they have already demonstrated their incredible potential by growing through the downturn – growth that is set to continue in the years ahead by an estimated four per cent each year.</p> <p>We are the acknowledged global leader in e-commerce – spending more online per capita than any other country in the world. </p> <p>Our businesses are successfully exploiting the internet to expand their sales overseas – exporting £2.80 for every £1 imported, compared to 90 pence for every £1 in the offline economy.</p> <p>And our consumers are highly active online. We now have 40 million users of the internet, broadband penetration has doubled in the past five years, and 70 per cent of households are broadband subscribers. </p> <p>But, at the same time, we face significant barriers to growth.</p> <p>The country the world envies for its skills in creating digital content lags alarmingly behind when it comes to monetising it.</p> <p>Our broadband infrastructure is towards the middle rather than at the head of the pack. </p> <p>Only 15 per cent of UK subscribers currently have speeds above five mbps, compared with 65 per cent in South Korea.  And only 0.2 per cent of UK households had a superfast broadband connection at the end of last year – compared to 12 per cent in Sweden and 34 per cent in Japan.</p> <p>And when it comes to Bill Clinton’s “Digital Divide” we are the country with 30 million people who go online every day and nine million people who haven’t been online once – that’s more than the population of our five largest cities.</p> <p>These are all big challenges. </p> <p>Today I want to focus on an area where I believe the government has a pivotal role to play – namely in ensuring that we have world-class digital infrastructure in place.  </p> <p>The LSE believe a superfast network will create 280,000 new jobs, while NESTA believe it will be more like 600,000. The Federation of Small Businesses believes it could add £18 billion to GDP. </p> <p>The potential is huge. But when I spoke to Jonathan Ive, the British Head Designer at Apple based in California, he told me that, unless you take extraordinary risks, you won’t survive in the digital world.</p> <p>I want our broadband infrastructure to make it possible for our entrepreneurs and investors to take those risks. </p> <p>To draw on what Shakespeare once called “The natural bravery of our Isle”, and use it to develop the commercial applications, products, services and content that will dominate in the high-speed world.</p> <p>But this is not just about economic growth. <br> <br>I am particularly pleased to be launching our strategy for superfast broadband at Reform today because it is also central to our agenda for public services reform.</p> <p>Already we can see how other countries are using next generation access to transform the delivery of public services.</p> <p>Australia, for example, where higher speed broadband has led to the School of the Air – a distance learning initiative which brings together students from remote areas in online classrooms. </p> <p>Or South Korea, where the Education Broadcast Service means that children who can’t afford to go to “cram schools” to prepare them for the crucial, national aptitude test can still access high quality educational tutorials online. </p> <p>Or America, where Snap! VRS uses teleconferencing to connect deaf citizens with sign language interpreters who can help them during medical consultations or with other services.</p> <p>“Ons Net” in The Netherlands is another good example. By taking fibre to the home for all residents of the small town of Nuenen, it has allowed a whole host of new services to develop and help raise their quality of life.</p> <p>From telecare systems for the elderly to live streaming of church services; from web applications for Alzheimer’s sufferers to virtual fitness coaching and local TV – there are countless examples of how superfast broadband is helping them to build a fairer, as well as a more prosperous, society.</p> <p>And we are already getting glimpses of that future here in the UK. </p> <p>At Alston Healthcare in Cumbria, for example, where medical staff are using next generation broadband to diagnose, treat and monitor remotely, while their patients are using it to book GP appointments and arrange repeat prescriptions via their TVs. </p> <p>Last month we announced that digital will increasingly be the default channel for delivering public services – just as it is for many service in the private sector.</p> <p>And as part of that, we announced a first wave of services that will have digital as their primary delivery channel – including student loans and jobseeker’s allowance applications for individuals, as well as VAT registration and Companies House services for businesses.</p> <p>For providers, digital is cheaper and more efficient. </p> <p>With Jobseeker’s allowance alone, the Department for Work and Pensions is expecting to save up to £100 million of taxpayers’ money by 2014-2015. </p> <p>For users, digital is simpler, more convenient and more personalised. </p> <p>That’s why Martha Lane Fox, as the UK’s Digital Champion, has the goal of closing the digital divide and making this country the first in which everyone has the opportunity to access the internet. </p> <p>Her campaign – Race Online 2012 – is making a real impact, working with more than 900 partners from all sectors. </p> <p>Just last week, Microsoft launched their “Give someone their first time on the web” initiative – opening up new opportunities to get people online, provide them with training, and even offer them your old PC.</p> <p>Closing that digital divide, and making that shift to online delivery, has the potential to transform the relationship between individuals and government;</p> <p></p> <p>Of course, it’s not the Government’s role to tell businesses what to do. </p> <p>Already, the market in the UK is making great strides in delivering superfast broadband. With Virgin Media and BT rapidly deploying networks, nearly 50 per cent of households can now access speeds of 50Mbps.</p> <p>At the same time, smaller providers such as Rutland Telecom, Vtesse and Geo are finding innovative ways of delivering superfast broadband in areas where the economic climate is more of a challenge. </p> <p>But the Government does have a key role to play in stimulating competition and catalysing investment in the new infrastructure we need.</p> <p>That’s why, in the recent spending review, we announced £530 million of funding to support broadband rollout – with the potential for making an extra £300 million available for the period 2015-2017.</p> <p>The strategy we are publishing today represents our plan for how to spend it in a way that will stimulate the greatest possible investment in our superfast broadband network. </p> <p>That means opening up access to existing infrastructure, including BT’s network of ducts and poles. </p> <p>It means working with local authorities to reduce the cost of broadband roll-out by clarifying existing guidance on streetworks and micro-trenching.</p> <p>It means issuing new guidance for builders and contractors on how to make sure new buildings are broadband ready – and I’m pleased to say that the British Standards Institution and the Building Research Establishment, who have led this work for us, have brought out that guidance today.</p> <p>And, at a time when half of all new web connections are mobile connections, it means awarding the 800MHz and 2.6GHz spectrum to allow the development of the next generation of mobile service.</p> <p>Technology neutrality is a central part of this strategy. </p> <p>No single technology will be suitable for all circumstances, and a mix of technologies – fixed, wireless and satellite – will be needed if we are to deliver on our ambition throughout the UK.</p> <p>But at the same time we recognise that taking high-capacity fibre deeper into the network is likely to be key – which is why our goal today is very simple: to deliver a fibre point in every community in the UK by the end of this parliament.</p> <p>In order to help achieve this, I can announce that we will be making up to £50 million of funding available for a second wave of superfast broadband market testing projects – to add to those that we have already established in North Yorkshire and Herefordshire, Cumbria and the Highlands and Islands.</p> <p>We will be inviting local bodies and devolved administrations right across the UK to propose new testing projects in April of next year, with a view to making a final selection in May. </p> <p>I am giving everyone advanced notice of this to allow local communities time to develop broadband strategies and work out which projects they need the most.</p> <p>I am also very pleased to be able to say that we have been having constructive discussions with BT and the BBC about the role they can play in fulfilling these ambitions.</p> <p>The BBC recognise that, as one of the biggest drivers of demand for broadband through the iPlayer, the licence fee has a big role to play.  But they are doing much more and have indicated they are considering funding outreach and education programmes in the areas where we have pilots.  </p> <p>As a result, they have announced a series of new initiatives.</p> <p>A one Gigabit per second trial in Kesgrave, near Ipswich, early in the New Year – a speed that can download a two hour film in just 12 seconds.</p> <p>An extension of their highly successful “Race to Infinity” campaign.</p> <p>A decision to include up to 40 market towns in rural areas in their next phase of superfast broadband deployment in late 2011and early 2012. </p> <p>And last, but by no means least, a signal that they intend to bid for our £830 million investment by matching it with a similar investment.</p> <p>According to their analysis, this matched fund will ensure that superfast broadband will reach 85-90 per cent of the country.</p> <p>It’s a great example of how public investment and government action can stimulate further investment from the private sector.</p> <p></p> <p>The broadband scorecard developed by the Berkman Centre at Harvard focuses on three areas – speed, coverage, and price. </p> <p>To that, we are adding an additional factor: choice. </p> <p>If, by the end of this parliament, we are performing across these four areas then we will have met our ambition. </p> <p>But in reality “best” means more than just a measurement against a set of indicators. </p> <p>It means more than a broadband network that will help us to secure and underpin our economic future. One that can put the UK right up there with the rest of the world when it comes to internet innovation. </p> <p>It means one that will make sure that everyone can benefit from being online, and that no one is excluded.</p> <p>Like the young man from Leeds who told Martha Lane Fox that the opportunity to learn how to make and sell music online had turned his life around after drug addiction. Without the internet, he said, he “would be dead”.</p> <p>Or the woman in her 80s I met in Downing Street in the summer who told me that getting online had, quite simply, stopped her from feeling lonely.</p> <p>New technology is not perfect. It is a force that needs to be carefully harnessed.</p> <p>But in the end we should remember that its benefits are not just about efficiency, or growth, or jobs but about a lasting, positive impact on each of our daily lives. </p> <p>A positive impact that the Government is determined to make possible. </p> <p>[ENDS]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7622.aspx Jeremy Hunt Britain’s Superfast Broadband Future uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 06/12/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport Speech to Reform
<p>Thursday 21 October 2010</p> <p><strong>The Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt): </strong>By 2014-15, the end of this Spending Review period, DCMS’ combined capital and resource budget will be 25 per cent lower than in 2010-11.  </p> <p>The purpose of this statement is to explain in more detail what this means for those working in our sectors.   </p> <p>The Government recognises that these are difficult cuts.  However, it has had no choice, given the pressing need to reduce the deficit.<br>In looking to make savings my strategy has been based on four principles: <br></p> <p>In addition the BBC will contribute an additional £150m per year for broadband in the four years between 2013/14 and 16/17.  This is part of a wider agreement with the BBC that will freeze the licence fee at £145.50 until April 2017.  As part of this deal the BBC has agreed to take on a suite of additional spending requirements, including the BBC World Service, a significant contribution to S4C and support for Local Television.</p> <p>Finally with great regret I have also taken the decision to withdraw funding from the Commission for Architecture and Built Environment (CABE).</p> <p>The action I have taken will ensure that our sectors will get through the coming years without long term damage.    They will also benefit from our decision to restore the Lottery to its original good causes, which will mean that the arts, sports and heritage sectors will each get £50m a year extra funding from 2012. </p> <p>More detail on our resource settlement is provided below and in the accompanying tables which set out DCMS’s budgets by sector and by funded bodies and programmes.  </p> <p>I am also providing an outline of my capital investment plan for the Spending Review period.  This includes support for projects of major significance such as redevelopments of the British Museum and the Tate Modern, as well as continued support for sports facilities through Sport England.     </p> <p>In line with the Government’s commitment to transparency, I will publish all of the allocation letters I am sending to our funded bodies so that the public can see how their money is being spent and what we expect in return. </p> <p>While we have had to make a number of very difficult decisions, we have acted in a decisive way that maximises the resources going to the front line.   Our priority now is to get on with delivering the services the public want over the period of this Parliament and beyond.</p> <p>The top priority for my Department remains the delivery of a safe and successful Olympic and Paralympic Games. London 2012 will be a defining moment for our nation, when the eyes of the world will be upon us. </p> <p>The public sector funding package available for the Games will remain at £9.3bn. Government funding for the programme, excluding security, will be held by my Department. The Greater London Authority (GLA) and Olympic Lottery Distributor will continue to contribute as per the 2007 Spending Review agreement. Security funding will be provided primarily by the Home Office, based on the principle that costs will lie where they fall.</p> <p>This settlement ensures that the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) is fully funded through to the completion of the programme. We have reduced the ODA’s forecast completion cost by £20m, in part by no longer delivering the external “Wrap” around the Olympic Stadium, subject to planning conditions, and unless alternative sources of funding can be found. </p> <p>In recognition of the changing focus of the programme from construction to the operational delivery of the Games, the Spending Review settlement makes provision totalling around £0.5bn for specific operational requirements.</p> <p>As noted in the National Security Strategy, we must not underestimate the security challenge.  The Spending Review settlement makes provision to ensure that all Olympic and Paralympic sporting and non-sporting venues, totalling over 100, are secure throughout the preparatory phase and six weeks of Olympic and Paralympic competition. This is over and above the funding for Olympic policing and wider security, but both are contained within the £9.3bn funding package. As set out in the Bid, venue security is a shared responsibility of the event organiser – the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) – and the Government. LOCOG will lead the delivery of securing venues in collaboration with the police and other security agencies. </p> <p>The settlement will also provide for specific extra responsibilities, for host local authorities where the burden imposed for specific Games-time operations is of such a scale that it should not be borne solely by local council-tax payers, and for shared responsibilities for the safety of spectators and visitors between transport hubs and sporting venues where existing budgets cannot cover the additional requirement.</p> <p>The remainder of the funding package – around £0.5bn - will be held as an Olympic contingency for cross-programme issues including a material change in security circumstances.  Contingency will be strictly controlled and will only be released to meet costs that are essential for the delivery of the Games, where they cannot reasonably be met from existing budgets.  The contingency will be held partly by DCMS and partly within HM Treasury’s general Reserve. </p> <p>The Government remains committed to the public sector funding half of the incremental cost of the Paralympic Games. This is included within the £9.3bn funding package. Separately, and outside of the £9.3bn funding package, all Government Departments are clear as to their operational responsibilities and will fund them as required. This is recognised in their settlements. </p> <p>The Capital and Resource allocations for the DCMS element of the Olympic and Paralympic Programme are set out in the table which accompanies this statement.   Further details of the Spending Review outcome for the Olympic programme will be provided in the next Quarterly Economic Report on the Games, due to be published on 9 November.  </p> <p>The Government remains committed to elite, community and youth sport in the run up to hosting the London 2012 Games, and is confident it can deliver a real and lasting legacy. </p> <p>We have made clear to UK Sport that their first priority must continue to be world class funding for Olympic and Paralympic sport in order to deliver medal success on the world stage.        As part of this settlement, they will maintain the agreed funding for Olympic and Paralympic sports up to 2012, subject to the usual performance related decisions, as well as seeking to maximise performance in Glasgow 2014 and at the next Winter Olympics and Paralympics.   After 2012 there will be reductions to the direct budget for Olympic and Paralympic sports  but we are confident that these can be limited to 15 per cent in real terms and we have made clear we want UK Sport to look hard for additional private sector sponsorship to make up for this.  </p> <p>We have also secured a good settlement for sport’s national governing bodies as part of the overall settlement with Sport England. In our discussions with them, we have been clear that resource funding for Whole Sport Plans (WSPs) is to be protected and subject to a cut of no more than 15 per cent in real terms over the period of this Spending Review. The resource budget for these plans will be in addition to continued Lottery funding and capital funding.<br> <br>Protecting the front line in this way will mean some tough choices and I have been clear with both UK Sport and Sport England that their spending on administration needs to be reduced by 50 per cent by the end of the Spending Review period. Whilst we are planning for the organisations to merge after the Olympics, we expect them to start finding administrative savings through closer working before then.   </p> <p>Alongside continued funding for these two organisations, we will continue to support UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) and the Football Licensing Authority (FLA). Given their important work both these organisations will receive below average reductions in funding.  We expect them to find this from administration and efficiency rather than reduced services.</p> <p>This country has some of the finest cultural institutions in the world and we are determined to protect them so they can be enjoyed by everybody both now and in the future.   <br>Our starting point has been to look for large savings to the amount of public money spent on bureaucracy.    We have previously announced that we are abolishing the Museums Libraries and Archives Council, and as part of this settlement we are asking Arts Council England to reduce their administration budget by 50 per cent as well as cutting back sharply on discretionary, non essential, spend. <br>By taking these tough decisions we are able to limit any damage to the front line. We have been clear with the Arts Council that it needs to protect the grants it makes to regularly funded arts organisations, - the backbone of this country’s artistic life.   Individual decisions about which organisations to fund are for the Arts Council to make, but we have been clear that the total funding for arts organisations is to be reduced by no more than 15 per cent in real terms over the Spending Review period.    </p> <p>We are providing similar protection to the British Library and the National and non- National Museums which my Department sponsors. By limiting reductions to their resource funding to 15 per cent in real terms over the period, we are ensuring they are able to continue with the successful policy of free entry. </p> <p>I am also giving these organisations the freedom to access up to £143 million of their historic reserves over the next four years.  This is an important step towards delivering on the Coalition commitment to providing greater freedoms for national museums and will encourage them to work towards attracting further philanthropic donations.</p> <p>Another area I am able to protect is the successful Renaissance in the Regions programme which has done so much to improve the quality of Museums in all parts of the country.   While we are abolishing the MLA, this programme will transfer to another body from 2012 with cuts to its budget limited to 15 per cent in real terms.   </p> <p>We have also agreed to transfer the administration of the Public Lending Right (PLR), the fund which compensates authors for the loans of their books in public libraries.   While the total funding for the PLR will be reduced over the Spending Review period, this will also be limited to 15 per cent in real terms and the fund will continue to be ring fenced.  Given the need to find savings, we have decided at this stage not to extend the fund to cover audio and e-books.</p> <p>We also remain wholly committed to safeguarding our heritage for future generations.</p> <p>As part of this settlement, English Heritage and the other grant giving bodies will remain as separate and effective funders for the sector.   We are, however, demanding significant efficiencies and as with other major bodies we are insisting that English Heritage reduces its administration budgets by 50 per cent over the Spending Review period and cuts back on non-essential services.  </p> <p>We want English Heritage to prioritise core activities such as planning advice, grants for heritage at risk and the conservation and maintenance of sites in its care.   We also want them to strengthen their fundraising capacity and increase self-generated income. </p> <p>The settlement also allows us to continue with funding some of our smaller but vitally important Heritage organisations.   While they too will be expected to find savings on their running costs, we will continue to support the likes of the Royal Naval College in Greenwich, the Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust and the Churches Conservation Trust to carry on their important work with better than average settlements.   Grants to the Royal Household for the occupied Royal Palaces will also be protected, with reductions in funding of less than 13 per cent in real terms. </p> <p>We have also awarded a fixed sum every year to continue the Listed Places of Worship Scheme, which has already helped over 9000 local communities up and down the country. In line with previous announcements, from January 2011 we will be returning this scheme to its original scope of eligibility and these restrictions will also apply for the next Spending Review period.  </p> <p>Protecting these services has meant taking some tough decisions.   One of these is to reduce funding for the Royal Parks.  Another is our decision to withdraw our funding for the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE).   While I recognise the part that CABE has played in promoting well designed buildings and public spaces, I have judged that the most pressing need is to protect and maintain other parts of our culture and heritage.   </p> <p>One of the reasons why we are protecting our cultural institutions is that they play a key role in promoting tourism, an important industry which we are committed to developing. </p> <p>As part of this settlement we have agreed that VisitBritain and VisitEngland will continue to play a crucial role in this area but like all our other major bodies they will have to find administrative savings of 50 per cent over the next four years.    </p> <p>We also want their remaining spending to be more focused, targeted and effective.  In the case of Visit Britain, this means concentrating on international marketing and PR activity in the top and emerging international markets.  Over the course of this Spending Review period we are asking them to create a powerful £100m partnership marketing fund, with matching funds from the industry and Government to promote the UK as a tourist destination before, during and after the Olympic games.  </p> <p>At the same time we want Visit England to focus more on investment in and support for destination management organisations and the local businesses, local authorities and enterprise partnerships involved in tourism up and down the country.  </p> <p>More information on all of this will be provided as part of our tourism strategy, to be published later this year, which will set out a detailed vision for boosting UK tourism and capitalising on hosting the Olympics in 2012.</p> <p>Through this Spending Review settlement we will continue to champion our Creative Industries and the contribution that they make to economic growth. </p> <p>One of the ways we will do this is by establishing one of the fastest broadband networks in Europe.   Over the next four years we will invest £230m in broadband. In addition, the BBC will contribute an additional £150m per year for broadband in the four years between 2013/14 and 16/17.</p> <p>We are committed to supporting an independent BBC but are also keen to drive efficiencies and ensure better value for money for the licence fee payer.  To that end, we have agreed the licence fee settlement for the remainder of the Charter period.  The level of the licence fee will be frozen at £145.50 until April 2017 and as part of this deal the BBC has agreed to take on a suite of additional spending requirements, including the BBC World Service, a significant contribution to S4C and support for Local Television.</p> <p>We are committed to the future of Welsh Language broadcasting and as part of the BBC Licence fee deal we have secured S4C’s funding for four years.   Subject to the current rules around the RPI link being changed as part of the Public Bodies Bill which will be introduced later this year, S4C’s budget will be reduced from its current levels by 24.4% over the spending review period and a partnership arrangement with the BBC will start by 2013/14.  While the Government will provide the majority of funding to S4C over the SR period, the BBC will become the primary funder of S4C from 2013/14.  This will happen under a new a partnership between S4C and the BBC which will retain S4Cs unique identity and editorial independence.  </p> <p>We are also committed to supporting our film industry.  As with other areas we are determined to eradicate waste and bureaucracy and we have previously announced our decision to abolish the UK Film Council by 1 April 2012. </p> <p>While we are still discussing how best to support the industry going forward  we are committed to seeking to protect funding for a number of important areas over the next four years.  This includes support for the film industry in the nations and in the regions, the MEDIA desk which helps secure and administer European funding, support for inward investment and work to carry out certification as part of the system of tax relief for British films. </p> <p>It also includes support for the BFI which we will fund directly to maintain its important work, not least caring for one of the world's richest and most significant collections of film archives.  As with other front line services, such as Museums and RFOs, we are committed to limiting reductions in their funding to no more than 15 per cent in real terms over the course of the spending review period. <br><br><br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7508.aspx Jeremy Hunt Written Ministerial Statement: DCMS Spending Review settlement uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 21/10/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Tuesday 28 September 2010<br>London</p> <p>Bill Gates talked about the internet as the “town square for the global village of tomorrow”. </p> <p>Technology has turbo-charged globalisation. Corporate networks, commerce and communication all link seamlessly as if traditional boundaries didn’t exist.</p> <p>And this is all made possible by the fact that we now spend nearly half of our waking hours using communications technology – hooked up to always-on networks in a way that writers like Nicholas Carr believe is actually rewiring our brains. </p> <p>But today I want to talk about a side to the digital revolution that is less often talked about.</p> <p>A kind of reaffirmation of Newtonian law in the digital age...</p> <p>Because this drive towards globalisation has been accompanied by an equal and opposite reaction.</p> <p>A desire to strengthen the ties that bind us to our families, our neighbours and our communities; to rediscover our sense of identity.</p> <p>And just as new technologies make globalisation possible, they make localisation possible too:</p> <p>This localising force of the digital revolution is not as widely recognised as its globalising power. But it is actually more significant.</p> <p>Let me explain why.</p> <p>Look at the huge number of hyper-local websites that are now springing up in neighbourhoods around the country.</p> <p>When users of some of these sites were asked what they get out of them, over two-thirds said that they felt more able to influence local decisions. </p> <p>An even higher proportion said that using the sites had strengthened their attachment to their local neighbourhood and increased their sense of belonging.</p> <p>Why is this important? </p> <p>This country is fast becoming one of the most atomised societies in the world. </p> <p>In a single generation, the proportion of households made up of just one person has doubled. Here in the City of London, the number of households made up of people living on their own has reached an astonishing 60%.</p> <p>Already, more than half of people on their own say that loneliness is the single biggest stress factor in their lives. And it’s the Facebook generation – the 18-34s – who are now twice as likely to feel lonely as the over 55s.</p> <p>So understanding how technology can nourish the roots of a big and strong society is of huge social importance.</p> <p>And this has more implications for the media sector than perhaps any other.</p> <p>We have always prided ourselves in this country on an extraordinarily strong and diverse media landscape – and rightly so.</p> <p>With the BBC as the touchstone of quality, we have some of the most creative broadcasters and programme makers in the world.</p> <p>Our independent TV production sector is bigger than any other in Europe or the Americas.</p> <p>We are a global leader in sales of TV formats, and the world’s second biggest exporter of TV programming hours.</p> <p>We can be really proud of what we have achieved. </p> <p>But for any country, the media has a unique role to play: as the mirror that society holds up to itself. </p> <p>Future generations will learn more about us from what we watched on TV than from any historian.</p> <p>And looking at our media in 2010, they will conclude that it was deeply, desperately centralised.</p> <p>They will be astonished to find that three out of five programmes made by our public service broadcasters are produced in London.</p> <p>They will note that there is nothing but national news on most of the main channels, beamed shamelessly from the centre.</p> <p>And they will discover token regional news broadcasts that have increasingly been stretched across vast geographical areas – with viewers in Weymouth watching the same so-called ‘local’ story as viewers in Oxford. Viewers in Watford watching the same story as viewers in Chelmsford. </p> <p>The idea that somehow the UK “can’t sustain” local TV will seem very quaint when they compare us to other countries.</p> <p>Not just bigger countries like the US – where people can typically access 6 local TV stations, even in smaller cities.</p> <p>But countries the same size as us like France – where there are more than 100 local channels.</p> <p>Or countries with smaller populations like Sweden and Canada – with 80 and 130 local broadcast stations respectively.</p> <p>And they will not be surprised to learn that in 2010 our communities are weaker, our local identity less pronounced, and our local democracy less developed than in any of these countries.</p> <p>The Coalition Government is determined to change this.</p> <p>That’s why, when the Cabinet met at Chequers in July, we agreed on two guiding principles that underpin everything we do.</p> <p>The first is to focus the Government on long-term challenges, not short-term presentation.</p> <p>The second is to solve problems by decentralising power, not simply by intervening from the top-down. </p> <p>It is on this second challenge that we need the media to play its part.</p> <p>How can we devolve power to locally-elected politicians if we don’t have a properly developed local broadcasting sector to help hold them to account?</p> <p>Local radio and newspapers already play their part. </p> <p>But look at the Mayoral elections that take place in cities all over the US. The critical medium that allows voters to form their view is local TV. </p> <p>Here in Britain, look at the vital role played by the television debates at the last general election. </p> <p>Are we going to prevent that happening at a local level by refusing to liberalise our over-centralised media landscape?</p> <p>Are we going to stifle local debate at precisely the moment when – because of the Government’s open data agenda – communities will have better access to information on things like council spending and the performance of local schools or hospitals than ever before?</p> <p>As long as we rely on a system that shuts out local voices, we cannot aim to be the most open and plural society in the world. </p> <p>I believe we should aspire to nothing less. Which is why this coalition government is committed to creating space for local broadcasting in this country.<br><br></p> <p>The philosophical case is easy enough to argue. But I believe there is a practical case too. </p> <p>First of all, there is the overwhelming evidence for viewer demand.</p> <p>8 out of 10 people in this country consider local news stories important. ‘Focus on the local area’ is consistently ranked as a high priority, and nearly 7 out of 10 adults feel that the ‘localness’ of stories is more important than them being professionally produced. </p> <p>Think back to January – when the wintry weather drew in enormous audiences wanting to discover what the impact of the snow was in their communities. </p> <p>10 million viewers on BBC regional news, 5 million on ITV bulletins. </p> <p>Imagine what could have been achieved if we had broadcasters with local rather than regional footprints.</p> <p>Because all the research suggests that, while audiences attach real value to ‘localness’, they find it hard to identify with the concept of a ‘region’; </p> <p>That for the majority of people, living most of their lives within a 14 mile radius, what we’re used to calling ‘local’ is anything but. </p> <p>Look at the BBC, which has tried make its regional news more locally focused – particularly in cities like Oxford and Cambridge – and which has kept audiences stable over the past 5 years.</p> <p>Compare that to ITV, which has taken the opposite strategy – merging some of its regions and seeing its audiences steadily decline.</p> <p>Look at Sir Ray Tindle – who runs one of the most successful newspaper groups in the country from Farnham in my constituency. </p> <p>He tells a story about how he rescued the Tenby Observer by insisting that every line should be about Tenby and nowhere else but Tenby. It’s a locally-focused strategy that has helped his network of 230 titles to hold its own impressively well during the recession.</p> <p>Demand for local media is strong – as long as we meet it in the right way.</p> <p>Of course, if viewers want the product, then it should be commercially viable. Why then do so many people say that local TV is not possible in the UK? </p> <p>It may work in America, they say – but not here.</p> <p>It may work in Germany or Spain – but not here.</p> <p>It may work in Lyon or Marseille, Dublin or Galway – but not here.</p> <p>The answer is that we have established structures in this country that make it virtually impossible for local TV to thrive. </p> <p>That’s why I asked Nicholas Shott, Head of UK Investment Banking at Lazard, to help me understand what changes are needed to make local broadcasting commercially viable.</p> <p>He will produce a full report later this year, and I’d like to say how incredibly grateful I am to him and his steering group for the work they have underway. </p> <p>But he has also provided me with some initial findings that I am publishing today. I am pleased to say that that he has taken an extraordinarily thorough and practical approach to the challenge. </p> <p>None of us should underestimate the scale of the task, but I have been broadly encouraged by what he has found so far. </p> <p>Of course we know there are challenges. Of course we will need to learn from the experience of stations like Channel M and the difficulties it has faced raising local advertising revenue. </p> <p>But nowhere in the US, Canada, or anywhere else have I been able to find a broadcaster able to make 24-hour local content commercially viable – so we should be realistic: it is not likely to happen here either.</p> <p>And when it comes to advertising revenue, we are not helped by the fact that – unlike in France – we have not developed a reliable audience measurement system;</p> <p>One which allows local TV channels to make a full pitch to advertisers based on the number of households they reach and their audience demographic.</p> <p>More importantly, Nick Shott challenges us by asking: if alternative sources of revenue such as subscription, carriage fees, product placement and sponsored programming can work for national TV, why can’t they do so for local stations?</p> <p>The truth is that the whole of the sector must now face up to the impact of the internet, and make sure that their business models are not over-reliant on advertising revenues.</p> <p>We must grasp the opportunities provided by technology to develop new and innovative models that can really work.</p> <p>We cannot simply carbon copy what happens in other countries. </p> <p>We can’t rely, for example, on the cable penetration that is a major factor in bringing down costs in North America and Germany. </p> <p>And we don’t want to rely on the kind of public subsidy we see in France and Spain.</p> <p>But we should look at where there are lessons to be learned: </p> <p>Like 8tv in Catalonia, which turns a profit as a standalone commercial operation; or LCM in Marseille which uses other TV businesses to support its local broadcasting model; or Sweden, where four of the six local stations are run by local newspaper groups.</p> <p>Yes, audiences are increasingly using multiple platforms. But TV remains the central point of the living room, more people are watching it than ever before, and local content has a right to appear on that platform.</p> <p>And the enthusiastic, positive response that we have received from industry, both to the last government’s IFNC initiative and to our review by Nicholas Shott, indicates a real willingness to engage – from the BBC, Sky and ITV to Ten Alps, Scottish newspaper groups and Northcliffe Media. </p> <p>My vision is of a landscape of local TV services broadcasting for as little as one hour a day; </p> <p>Free to affiliate to one another – formally or informally – in a way that brings down costs; </p> <p>Free to offer nationwide deals to national advertisers; </p> <p>Able to piggyback existing national networks – attracting new audiences and benefitting from inherited ones at the same time. </p> <p>And able to exploit the potential of new platform technologies such as YouView and mobile TV to grow their service and improve their cost-effectiveness.</p> <p>As Nicholas has said: at least initially, local TV is most likely to succeed in urban areas. So we will need to rely on new technologies to deliver local content to more rural communities. </p> <p>That’s why I am determined to make sure that we have the broadband infrastructure in place that will allow people to access the local content they want online.</p> <p>Through community television stations such as Witney TV – a hyper-local initiative that is helping to prove that the Big Society is alive and well in David Cameron’s constituency.</p> <p>Already, I have announced a number of market testing projects to bring superfast broadband to rural and hard-to-reach areas.</p> <p>And, more widely, I have set Britain the goal of having the best superfast broadband in Europe by the end of this parliament. </p> <p>Here we have much to learn from countries such as South Korea that are leading the way. So I’m very much looking forward to hearing what our next speaker – Professor Suk-Ho Bang – has to tell us.</p> <p>Above all, my vision is for this country to become the first in which a new generation of local media companies will emerge.</p> <p>A hungry, ambitious and innovative new sector which is truly cross-platform and totally multi-media.</p> <p>Companies able to follow their customers from radio to TV, from newspaper to internet, from iPhone to iPad.</p> <p>And in order to achieve this, the Government is ready to do its bit. </p> <p>We know that what is now needed is a far-reaching re-examination of the communications environment in this country – a process that will culminate in a new Communications Act in the second half of this parliament. </p> <p>But we want to start immediately by making path-finding changes at a local level.</p> <p>I have already announced that the Government will remove most of the local cross-media ownership regulations – paving the way for local newspaper and commercial radio groups to develop new business models that allow them to move freely from platform to platform.</p> <p>Today I can confirm that the Government will shortly be bringing forward an order to remove all of the remaining local cross-media rules. </p> <p>And in response to Nicholas Shott’s initial findings, there are three other specific areas for government action that I would like to focus on today. </p> <p>First, I will begin the process of redefining public service broadcasting for the digital age by asking Ofcom to look at how we can ensure that enough emphasis is given to the delivery of local content.</p> <p>Of course not all PSBs will want, or be able, to be local broadcasters. But I’m determined that we should recognise the public value in those that do.</p> <p>Second, I intend to bring forward new legislation to clarify which PSB channels should get guaranteed positioning on page one of the Electronic Programme Guide and its future online equivalents.</p> <p>As we move into a multi-channel, multi-platform era, this is likely to become the principle intervention through which we repay broadcasters who invest in content with a social or cultural benefit. I want to make sure we have absolute clarity on how that will work.</p> <p>Finally, I’ve been strongly encouraged by the serious thought that the BBC has been giving to how it might partner with new local media providers. </p> <p>In the weeks and months ahead, I will be looking at a variety of ways in which our existing public service broadcasters can play their part in supporting the development of a viable and sustainable local TV landscape. </p> <p>We will produce our full local media action plan before the end of the year – to be published alongside Nicholas Shott’s final report. </p> <p>Shakespeare wrote: “Screw your courage to the sticking place, and we’ll not fail”.</p> <p>So this is my challenge to the UK media and broadcasting sector.</p> <p>Over very many years you have proved yourself to be amongst the most innovative, dynamic and creative players in the world. </p> <p>The quality of British TV and the fearsome reputation of our media more widely have been integral to our democracy and have enhanced our standing in the world.</p> <p>But we are not perfect. </p> <p>If we remain centralised, top-down and London-centric – in our media provision as in the rest of government – we will fail to reflect the real demand for stronger local identity that has always existed and that new technologies are now allowing us to meet.</p> <p>But if we respond to the challenge we will be able to show that one of the world’s most open, diverse and plural democracies has once again been able to reinvent itself as the country to watch and not the country to leave behind.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7447.aspx Jeremy Hunt Royal Television Society uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 28/09/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport London
<p>Thursday 15 July 2010<br>London</p> <p>Thank you all for coming.</p> <p>It has been a confusing couple of weeks for the industry. </p> <p>First the CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt, was in town, telling us that it is now vital that businesses and government build their strategies around the internet. That we “put internet first”.</p> <p>Then we had the rock star, Prince, who informed us that: “the internet is completely over”.<br><br>As Secretary of State responsible for broadband as well as the music industry I feel somewhat conflicted. But on this one Eric is right and Prince is wrong.<br><br><strong>A clear commitment</strong><br><br>I hope you are in no doubt whatsoever about how important the Government considers broadband as a part of our economic infrastructure.<br><br>In his very first speech as Chancellor, George Osborne spoke about the urgent need to address Britain’s creaking broadband network. <br>In his very first speech as Prime Minister, David Cameron spoke about laying the cables of superfast broadband within the next five years as a central Government commitment.<br><br>And in my own first speech to the sector, I set out how – despite the economic crisis and huge deficit - we will be pressing on to support investment in the superfast network and to bring the benefits of broadband to everyone in the country.  <br><br>All of us realise that our broadband network is as fundamental to Britain’s success in the digital era as the railway network was in the industrial age.<br><br>All of us share the ambition that, by the end of this Parliament, this country should have the best superfast broadband in Europe and be up there with the very best in the world.<br><br>We are dead serious about making this happen. <br><br>Let me tell you why. <br><br><strong>The best foundations for growth<br></strong><br>In the run up to the general election I had the chance to do a lot of travelling around the country and to speak to a lot of people.<br><br>Everywhere I went, worries about the economy were the first thing on people’s minds. <br><br>People wondering where the new jobs will come from; <br><br>Where the new businesses will come from;<br><br>Or where the new growth sectors of the economy will lie. <br><br>Shakespeare said “Fear not for the future, weep not for the past.”<br><br>If we are to embrace a radically different economic future, we must recognise that a substantial part of the answer to these questions lies with the digital industries:<br></p> <p><strong>Economic impact <br></strong><br>What exactly will this mean for jobseekers, for small-business owners, and for our local and national economy?<br><br>The Information, Technology and Information Foundation has calculated that a government investment of £5 billion in next generation access would create nearly 300,000 jobs. <br><br>NESTA says that universal superfast broadband would create double that number, and add £18 billion to the UK’s GDP. <br>Some estimates say that in California – an economy roughly the size of the UK – next generation access will generate 2 million new jobs.<br><br>We only have to look back at the impact of first generation broadband to see that these are not fanciful figures.<br><br>First generation access provided a boost to our economy of some 0.5% to 1% per year, and meant that, over a four year period, employment grew 1% more in communities with broadband than in those without. <br><br>It also boosted British productivity. Firms that took up broadband early were 22% more productive than those that didn’t.<br><br>Of course we cannot fully predict the economic benefits and innovation that next-generation broadband will bring.<br><br>But to quote the great British author, Theodore Hook: “The best way to predict the future is to invent it”. <br><br>And I am determined that we start bringing the benefits of superfast broadband to bear on the British economy right away. <br><br><strong>Social impact<br></strong><br>But, with this commitment, the Government has far more than just economic benefits in our sights. We are determined to deliver social benefits as well. <br><br>Today, there are around 40 million internet users in this country, including 30 million who use it every day. <br><br>People with broadband at home now value it more highly than their land line, mobile phone or digital TV. Most say that they couldn’t do without it. <br><br>Yet there are still 10 million people in this country who have never used the internet. That’s one adult in every five. <br><br>And, of these, four million are not only digitally excluded, but socially or economically excluded too. <br><br>These are the people hardest hit by Britain’s digital divide. The people who, every day, are missing out on the massive advantages that the rest of us take for granted:<br></p> <p>That’s why David Cameron has appointed Martha Lane Fox to be the new ‘UK Digital Champion’ – with the task of closing the digital divide and getting the whole of the country online.<br><br>But Martha also has an additional role, working with Francis Maude as part of the Government’s Efficiency and Reform programme. </p> <p>That’s why Martha and I will be working closely with Francis over the next few months to support the faster migration of Government services online as a way of signalling our commitment to this agenda, and to help drive take up of new broadband services. <br><br>We will report on our progress early next year.<br><br><strong>The government’s role<br></strong><br>So broadband and next generation access are absolutely vital to the government’s agenda.<br><br>Let me now be clear about the role the government will play. <br><br>As George Osborne said in the emergency budget: “A genuine and long-lasting economic recovery must have its foundations in the private sector”.  When it comes to superfast broadband, there is no question that the market must lead the way.<br><br>That’s why I strongly welcome Virgin Media’s announcement that they will start to roll out a 100Mbps service by the end of the year – available to about half of homes in the UK.<br><br>And why I also strongly welcome BT’s announcement of an extra £1 billion investment in infrastructure upgrades – extending its optical fibre roll out to reach two-thirds of the UK by 2015.<br><br>But we have always recognised that government must do its part as well:</p> <p>What kind of changes could we make to the legislative framework, or what other kind of regulatory support could we provide? <br><br>How best can we leverage the investment already made in public sector networks to bring down the cost to business?<br><br>Should we make it a requirement for utilities companies like Thames Water, for example, to lay empty fibre pipes every time they dig up the roads to avoid having to go to the same expense again?<br><br><strong>Conclusion <br><br></strong>To make this process work best for you, we need you to be as bold and as ambitious as possible. <br><br>Tell us exactly what you believe needs to be done to make investing in superfast broadband cheaper and more attractive, and to speed up the roll out of next generation access nationwide. <br><br>We will be happy to listen. And we will be happy to consider the action that you want.<br>Based on your feedback, we will come back in September with a clear plan for the legislative change that we need, and a clear timetable for making it happen.<br><br>Thank you.</p> <p>[ENDS]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7245.aspx Jeremy Hunt Broadband Industry Event uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 15/07/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport London
<p>28 June 2010<br>City of London Academy, Southwark </p> <p>Thank you all for coming, and thanks too to the City of London Academy for hosting us. </p> <p>I’m particularly pleased to have the opportunity to talk about this government’s priorities for school sports today: right at the start of the YST and Lloyds TSB’s National School Sports Week.</p> <p>This year nearly 14,000 schools and 5 million children will be taking part. And by encouraging them to have a go at an Olympic or Paralympic activity they have never tried before, it is an excellent example of harnessing the power of big sporting events to get more young people playing sport.</p> <p>Of course, it’s not easy to talk about sporting inspiration only hours after England’s World Cup disappointment. </p> <p>As someone born in 1966, just months after the only time we have ever won the World Cup, I too desperately wanted this time to be different.</p> <p>But sport is about picking yourself up after setbacks as well as winning trophies. On days like this we should measure our sporting potential by the height of our aspirations, not allow it to be limited by the despair of failure. </p> <p>Perhaps this too is the moment to remember that great sporting careers don’t start with the World Cup, Wimbledon or the Olympics. They begin in back yards, side streets and school playing fields right around the country. </p> <p>They may end up with expert guidance from a Fergie or an Arsene or a Carlo – but they start with a helping hand from teachers, volunteer coaches, and mums and dads.  <br>And on today of all days – whatever the fog of national disappointment – I want to be clear that, for this government, competitive sport really matters.</p> <p>Not just because it’s great entertainment.</p> <p>Not just because we have the Olympics in two years.</p> <p>But in its own right. As something that should be a vital part of growing up for every child in the country.</p> <p>It’s great to have Denise here – and what an inspiration she is to so many young people.</p> <p>But we need to banish the idea that those who care about competitive sport care only about finding the next Denise Lewis, David Beckham or Andy Murray.</p> <p>And as I mentioned Andy, the very best of luck to him in seeing off Sam Querrey later today. </p> <p>Of course we want to nurture world-class talent. But above all we want to nurture the values that are common in sport, but perhaps not as common outside sport as they should be.</p> <p>Discovering talents you never knew you had. Striving to be the best you can be. Teamwork in adversity. Dignity and generosity in victory or defeat. </p> <p>But the figures for involvement in competitive sport at school are still very disappointing. Fewer than 3 out of 10 pupils regularly compete against classmates, while fewer than 2 out of 10 compete against those in other schools. </p> <p>Too many young people want to take part in competitions – and simply don’t get the chance.</p> <p>Even more disappointing is what happens when young people leave school. Sports participation drops off sharply – with the number of 16-19 year-olds doing sport falling by a third compared to 11-15 year olds.</p> <p>For young women the drop-out rate is even higher. And for disabled people the picture is worse still – only 1 in 10 currently does 3 half-hour sessions of sport per week. </p> <p>The cost is enormous. Not just in terms of health, where 1 in 4 adults in this country are now classed as obese – the highest level in Europe. </p> <p>Not just in terms of social breakdown, where there is clear evidence that participation in sport reduces the propensity for at-risk teenagers to commit crime.</p> <p>But also in terms of educational attainment, where teachers know that physical activity boosts concentration and feeds through directly into improved academic performance. <br>The schools showing the fastest improvement in GCSE results over the past three years were schools with a sports speciality.</p> <p>So the question is not whether to focus on sport or on academic achievement. The question is whether we can afford to go on ignoring the fact that sport can help power academic performance.</p> <p>And let’s bury forever the idea that losing a sports competition is an assault on children’s self-esteem.</p> <p>Low self-esteem does not come from losing; it comes from not being emotionally equipped to deal with disappointments and setbacks. </p> <p>The point of competitive sport is to help provide that emotional ballast. </p> <p>To allow young people to experience competition in a structured, rules-based environment, and learn how to treat Kipling’s “two imposters” – triumph and disaster – “just the same.”</p> <p>Shakespeare wrote: “Ambition should be made of sterner stuff”. And there is a lesson here: we will never help people to reach their ambitions if we shield them from the self-discipline and risk-taking necessary to move to the next level.</p> <p>Competition addresses a basic human desire to stretch ourselves to the limit of our potential. </p> <p>Before Roger Bannister ran a four-minute mile in 1954, no one believed it was possible. The following year 37 people managed it – and the year after that there were 300 more.</p> <p>Banister didn’t just change what we thought he could do. He changed what we thought anyone could do. </p> <p>So encouraging young people to broaden the horizons of their ambition is vital – and competitive sport should play a major role in making that happen.</p> <p>Why is this so important now?</p> <p>Because the greatest sporting competition on the planet will arrive on our doorstep in 2012. </p> <p>Offering us a once in a lifetime opportunity to put this right.</p> <p>Two weeks ago I was in Plymouth to watch Tom Daley training for the Olympics. </p> <p>Still only 16, and with his school studies to contend with, he is in training ten times a week, every week. All those hours, days, weeks and months of training, for a dive that will last less than two seconds in 2012.</p> <p>His back two-and-a-half somersaults with two-and-a-half twists takes longer for me to say than for him to do.  </p> <p>He knows that success in two years’ time depends on the hours he puts in now. </p> <p>And he recognises that what he is working towards is not just a moment of glory in 2012, but an achievement that will last a lifetime, that no one will ever be able to take away.</p> <p>What extraordinary self-discipline. What remarkable determination. Like Denise, what a role model for thousands of young people.</p> <p>But if we are serious about making the most of what Seb Coe described as “the greatest opportunity sport in this country has ever had”; if we are truly determined to use the Games to secure a lasting legacy of increased participation in school sport, then it isn’t just our Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls that need to be putting in the hours now.</p> <p>It is ministers, officials, and of course schools themselves who need to be laying the groundwork. </p> <p>That’s why we are today announcing our plan to set up a nationwide, Olympic and Paralympic-style competition – open to every school and every child in the country.</p> <p>Annual competition days will start taking place in schools from the next academic year. And by the summer of 2012, I hope that tens of thousands of schools will have chosen to take part.</p> <p>That will mean more competition within every school. But the plan will also mean that local schools are pitted against each other in new, district leagues – starting from January next year.  This will encourage schools to try new sports and create new opportunities for children who may not have played much sport before.</p> <p>Any school team or individual athlete who succeeds at this level will then have the chance to progress through to annual, county or city-level festivals that will showcase the best of local competitive sport. </p> <p>Finally, at the top of the pyramid, the most talented young athletes in the country will have a chance to represent their school at a National Olympic-and-Paralympic-style event – with the first one hopefully taking place on the eve of the Games in our brand new Olympic Stadium in 2012.</p> <p>And, as a crucial part of the scheme, young people at every level will be able to add to the excitement and motivation by tracking the progress of their school online, and comparing themselves with other schools and individuals around the country. </p> <p>We will be setting out the full details of the scheme – including its name – in the autumn.</p> <p>But let me be very clear. Success will not be when the first national event takes place in 2012. Success will be when it happens in 2013, 2014, 2015 and every year from then on.</p> <p>That’s why this cannot simply be a government initiative. If we’re going to make this a permanent fixture in every school calendar, schools themselves must have a real stake in the scheme, and a whole range of partners must be involved right from the start. </p> <p>Already I’m working closely with the BOA, Sport England the Youth Sport Trust and LOCOG.</p> <p>I have discussed this with the Mayor of London who I am delighted to see is here and has given it his full support.</p> <p>And I will be talking to the BPA about how we can best bring the benefits of the scheme to young disabled people.</p> <p>Michael, Boris and I will also be asking some of our top Olympians and Paralympians to help build stronger connections between Team GB and local schools the length and breadth of the country.  </p> <p>This is an ambitious project. Getting it right with the time and money we have available will be a major logistical and operational challenge. </p> <p>But this is a once in a generation opportunity.</p> <p>To take the inspiration of heroes like Geoff Hurst in 1966, Jonny Wilkinson in 2003 or Rebecca Adlington in 2008 and turn into something that touches every child in every school in the country;</p> <p>To create a permanent sporting legacy for the London 2012 Games;</p> <p>To offer young people more opportunities than ever before to get involved in sport;</p> <p>To harness Olympic and Paralympic values to revive the culture of competitive sports in every school in Britain.</p> <p>I hope you will join me and Michael in the challenge.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7207.aspx Jeremy Hunt Sports keynote speech uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 28/06/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport City of London Academy, Southwark
<p>11 June 2010<br>Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy, Weymouth<br><br>I am very delighted to be here in Portland on what, if not exactly a summer’s day, is certainly a very British one.<br></p> <p>When I took up my post as Secretary of State, I said I wanted to give a speech outlining the new government’s direction of travel in each of my key areas of responsibility, and I that wanted to do so in my first month. I insisted on including tourism on that list, because all too often it has been viewed as a poor relation in the government policy agenda.<br><br>Well, tomorrow I will have been a cabinet minister for exactly a month. Paternity leave nearly upset my plans but I am particularly pleased that I am here to give this speech today, and am most grateful to you for coming.<br><br>There is no more fitting place to be, because Weymouth and Portland perfectly illustrate the two most key priorities that the new government has for our great tourist industry:</p> <p>I will return to these two priorities in a moment. But first I want to talk about why exactly I consider tourism to be crucial to this government’s agenda. <strong></strong></p> <p>So let me state plainly: tourism is critically important for this country.</p> <p></p> <p>Firstly, the opportunity we have as hosts of the Olympic and Paralympic Games.<br><br>Throughout the summer of 2012, the eyes of the world will be fixed firmly on our Games venues right around the country – including Weymouth and Portland Harbour.<br><br>Let me congratulate Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy on being the very first 2012 venue to have been completed, and on demonstrating time and time again that it is one of the jewels in the sporting crown of this country. <br><br>Given that Great Britain has been the most successful sailing nation for the last three Games in a row, I look forward to this becoming the arena for some of our greatest triumphs.<br><br>But I also know that hosting a global event in a small town will be a real challenge. <br><br>My department has a major role to play in helping you with your plans, which is why, right now, we have dedicated staff looking at the additional support you will need.<br><br>What you understand very clearly is that the Games must not just be about six weeks of fantastic sport in 2012. <br><br>In the words of Shakespeare, “Summer’s lease hath all too short a date” – and we cannot afford to let this priceless opportunity pass us by without ensuring a lasting economic benefit.<br><br>That means not only putting towns like Weymouth firmly on the international tourism map – which, having read about your ambitious plans, I feel confident will happen. <br><br>But also harnessing the full potential of 2012 to create a permanent tourism legacy – not just for London but for the UK as whole. <br><br>The whole of the country is paying for the Games; the whole of the country should reap the benefits. That means using them to create a sustained and sustainable increase in the number of tourists visiting our shores.</p> <p>Looking back at the tourism impact of previous Games, host countries have had some real success, but the overall picture remains mixed.<br><br>Barcelona’s hosting of the Games in 1992 helped propel the city from the 16th most popular short break destination in Europe to 3rd. As a percentage of the city’s total GDP, tourism rose from 2% to 12.5% in the ten years after the Games – although the impact on Spain as whole was more limited.<br><br>Sydney generated a boost in visitor numbers of 15% during the month of the Games and 11% over the year. Unfortunately despite a well-executed tourism strategy for Australia as a whole, 9/11 and SARS meant that the longer-term impact was limited. <br><br>Vancouver set out specifically to learn the lessons of Sydney as they prepared to host the Winter Games earlier this year, and we wish them every success with their ‘Keep Exploring’ campaign.<br><br>And as World Cup excitement reaches fever pitch this weekend (and the very best to Fabio and the team from the Department for Sport by the way), we should be looking to learn lessons from another great global sporting event.<br><br>Germany, by explicitly targeting people from countries like the UK who had never visited the country before, managed to climb nine places on the Nation Brand Index to reach 12th in the tourism rankings by the end of 2007. <br><br>My priority is to make sure that we get it right with 2012. It won’t be easy with the limited resources we have, but I want us to draw on all these lessons from other countries to produce the best tourism marketing plan that any Olympics host country has ever had. </p> <p>If my first priority today is about getting visitors into the UK, the second is about getting British holiday makers to stay in the UK.<br><br>We all know what Britain has to offer as a world-class tourist destination. But its advantages are often overlooked by Brits themselves.<br><br>In 2008, the amount spent by UK residents on domestic overnight tourism accounted for just 36% of their total tourism spend.<br><br>Of course, the fact that we all can and do travel abroad is to be welcomed. But for every MOMA there is a Tate Modern, for every St Kitts there is a St Austell, and for every Surfer’s Paradise there is a Chesil Beach.<br><br>Over the past year or two, the downturn has forced people to look at spending more of their holiday time at home. <br><br>The result was that, last year, overnight trips were up by 7% on 2008, and spending was up 4%. Overnight trips to the seaside were up by as much as 4 million.<br><br>What is most encouraging is that, according to research by VisitEngland, more than half of people described their domestic holiday as better than expected, and 8 out of 10 rated their experience as very good or excellent.<br><br>And this has had a clear impact on future intentions, with almost half saying that, even beyond 2010, they expect to take more breaks at home than they did in the past.<br><br>This presents a clear opportunity for our industry. A chance to demonstrate that we can compete better – in the quality and value of our hospitality sector, in the innovativeness and creativity of our visitor attractions, and in our ability to harness technological advances such as digital platforms and social networking to drive enterprise and growth.<br><br>So today I want to issue a challenge to the industry. How can we increase the proportion of tourism expenditure that UK residents spend in this country to 50%?<br><br>George Osborne has asked me to tell him if we can achieve this, and if so how. So in turn, today I want to enlist your help in telling me and John Penrose what needs to be done to reinvigorate our domestic tourism industry.<br><br>This is not a new government target – because this is not something the government can achieve on its own. It has to be done in partnership – with both the government and the industry together upping our game.<br><br>That means a relentless determination to drive up quality, whether accommodation, hospitality or customer service. It means making sure we always offer competitive prices and value for money. Or simply make it easier to holiday at home by ensuring that, if I want to get a train up to Cumbria, hire a car, and find a place to stay in Ambleside for the weekend, I can do so easily in one place online.<br><br>That is why John will be conducting a study, travelling the length and breadth of the country to seek your views between now and the end of September, after which he will report back to me. <br><br>Let’s be clear about what achieving this 50% target would mean. It would mean a boost to the UK economy of as much as £7 billion, along with thousands of new job opportunities right across the country.<strong></strong></p> <p>We only have to look at what destinations such as Bath have done here in the South West, or at the ambitious plans that you have for Weymouth to seize the opportunity of the Games, to find evidence of what it possible.<br><br>My message today is that, if you are ready to do your bit, we are ready to do ours.<br><br>If you are prepared to strain every sinew to take tourism forward, we will give you a government that stands foursquare behind you. And together we will make sure that tourism plays its fullest possible part in putting our great country’s economy back on its feet.  <br><br>Thank you.<br><br>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7162.aspx Jeremy Hunt Tourism keynote speech uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 11/06/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport
<p>8 June 2010<br>The Hospital Club, London<br><br>Thank you for coming today. And thanks too to Will and The Hospital Club for hosting this event, and for all the great work they are doing to celebrate, support and nurture some of our most exciting creative talent.</p> <p>Thank you to the people who played a great role to implement media policy, Jacqui Devereux, Roger Parry, Claire Enders and also to the team at DCMS for their professionalism in coping with the change of government.</p> <p>I wanted to set out this government’s plans for the media sector in my first month as culture secretary and my priorities in different areas. Paternity leave very nearly made that impossible, so I am most grateful to my wife for having our baby two weeks early to ensure I didn’t miss the deadline.<br><br>I consider my responsibility for media policy to be one of the most sacred I have. This is because the way our media operates – indeed its very existence as a voice wholly independent of government – is totally fundamental to our existence as a free society. <br><br>Karl Popper rightly thought that the key to both freedom and progress is the existence of open debate between plural and diverse voices. He would no doubt have agreed with Thomas Paine who said that “those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it”.<br><br>If we are to promote the plurality of voices that all of us agree matters so much, I want to argue today that our regulatory structure has been left long out of date by changes in technology. We need a radical rethink – and in the process perhaps be prepared for some of the fatigue Thomas Paine was talking about.</p> <p>But my starting point is actually a positive and not a negative one.<br><br>We have an extraordinarily strong and diverse media landscape in this country, combined with a remarkable wealth of talent in our creative industries.<br><br>For decades, our broadcasting sector has benefitted from a well-established public service tradition, backed by an essential commitment from politicians on all sides to the principles of editorial and operational independence.<br><br>By mixing broadcasters with public service traditions with hungry and innovative private sector players – public funding mechanisms alongside commercial financing models – a broadcasting landscape of real quality and maturity has emerged.<br><br>Partly driven by this, the growth of the creative industries has far outstripped that of the wider economy – averaging around 5% per year in the ten years to 2007 – while employment in these industries has continued to increase by an impressive 1.5% during the downturn.<br><br>Indeed, key areas of the sector have held up very strongly despite the recession.<br><br>Like film, where UK box office takings reached a record-breaking £944 million last year, and UK films grossed $2 billion at the box office worldwide;<br><br>Or independent TV production, which remains a bigger industry in the UK than anywhere in Europe or the Americas;<br><br>Or the video games industry, which now generates around £2 billion in global sales;<br><br>Or the music industry, where the international success of artists such as Lily Allen and Florence Welch meant that 1 in 10 albums sold in North America last year were by British acts.<br><br>And there is one thing that binds nearly all of these together, something of quite simply extraordinary significance for Britain’s economic future:<br><br>Nearly all of these industries involve the creation of digital content.<br><br>Why does this matter? Just as the Silk Road and Pax Britannica opened up trade in physical property, so the internet opens up trade in digital property.<br><br>So for the country that is probably the second best in the world at creating that digital property, this is a remarkable opportunity.</p> <p>If we grasp it. And I am afraid it is an “if” and not a “when.”<br><br>Because in many ways we seem to have stood still while other countries with far less to gain march ahead and steal our lunch.<br><br>A combination of recession and rapid technological advance has brought what should be great British industries to their knees – whether commercial TV, national newspapers or local commercial radio and newspapers.<br><br>In an age of localism we have virtually no local TV stations in our major cities, and Channel M in Manchester – one of the very few – has recently been forced to shed most of its employees.<br><br>We are now ranked 33rd in the world when it comes to broadband speed, with an average that is nearly 5 times slower than South Korea’s. <br><br>Some of our biggest creative companies – including the world’s largest advertising agency WPP – have chosen to relocate abroad.<br><br>We’re in danger of allowing ourselves to be once again defined by the old truism – that we provide the creativity and the rest of the world makes the money. <br><br>Rather than accepting this as inevitable, we ask why it was we developed such creative strengths in the first place.<br><br>The answer is because at critical moments we have faced up to technological change and not run away from it.<br><br>In broadcasting, for example, it wasn’t by reducing choice it was by increasing it. We licensed ITV in 1955, Channel 4 in 1982, Five in 1997 and unleashed the cable and satellite revolution in the 1990s.<br><br>We provided choice and innovation. And a well-funded BBC safeguarded quality and high standards.<br><br>As I have mentioned our national broadcaster, let me just say this: <br><br>The BBC is a great national institution; quite rightly the envy of the world. <br><br>Of course there are things we want it to do differently and better, but we recognise that core to its success has been its independence from political control. Nothing that this government does will compromise either the independence of the BBC or the quality of its output. <br><br>But core to the success of British broadcasting overall has been not just a strong BBC, but also strong competition to the BBC. We need to make sure that continues as well.<br><br>Enough theory and principles.</p> <p>Let me now focus on two specific areas where I want to take immediate action to improve the competitiveness and health of our media landscape.</p> <p>First of all broadband.<br><br>Wherever I go in the country, businesses tell me that access to fast, reliable broadband is increasingly essential to their competitive success.<br><br>Other countries are already moving ahead with rolling out next generation, superfast broadband based on fibre optics rather than copper.<br><br>The USA, France, Germany and Australia have all announced comprehensive national initiatives with ambitious headline targets.<br><br>Singapore wants universal access to superfast broadband by 2012, by which time Korea plans to have provided one million homes with 1 gigabit per second connections – a speed which can download a two hour film in just 12 seconds.<br><br>But in this country, the legacy was – in the same timescale – a commitment to a paltry 2 Mpbs universal connection. Necessary, of course, but pitifully unambitious compared to a Korean goal 500 times faster. <br><br>It is a scandal that nearly 3 million households in this country still cannot access 2 Mbps broadband speeds, and less than 1% of the country is able to access the internet using modern fibre optic technology – compared to an OECD average of around 10%.<br><br>Some people ask why we need these speeds when the iPlayer can manage on less than one Mpbs.<br><br>They are missing the point.<br><br>Superfast broadband is not simply about doing the same things faster. It’s about doing totally new things – creating a platform on which a whole generation of new businesses can thrive.<br><br>The Federation of Small Businesses has estimated that a superfast network could add £18 billion to GDP and create 60,000 jobs. NESTA thinks it could be ten times that – 600,000 new jobs. <br><br>We may not know the precise number but no one is any doubt about the economic impact. A country that is so good at creating digital content has an enormous amount to gain from developing the infrastructure over which it can be distributed, bought and sold.<br><br>But it isn’t only about business. Next generation broadband will open up new opportunities to improve public services such as education and healthcare.<br><br>The biggest driver of high speed broadband in Korea, where I was in January, is children getting help with their homework. Telemedicine is next – and already patients undergo heart surgery on the remote island of Guam supervised remotely by surgeons in Hawaii.<br><br>Of course there are significant costs involved, and wherever possible the market should lead the way, which is why we warmly welcome BT’s announcement to invest a further £1 billion in upgrading its network to reach two-thirds of the population is very welcome.<br><br>Virgin Media’s extension of superfast broadband – including its trials of a 200Mbps service in Coventry – is another positive step. <br><br>But I have always recognised that there has to be a role for government as well as the market.<br><br>Both in driving up demand for broadband by putting as many services as possible online.<br><br>And also – an objective I share with Caroline Spelman and her department – government must ensure we do not open up a new digital divide between the urban areas most attractive to infrastructure providers and rural communities where superfast broadband may never be viable.<br><br>So today I am announcing a first series of actions that will lead to the UK having a broadband infrastructure that meets the needs of all its citizens and businesses, and that will stand comparison with anywhere in the world. <br><br>First of all, as mentioned, the government supports the commitment to ensure a universal service level of 2Mbps as the very minimum that should be available. We will use a proportion of the underspend on digital switchover to fund this.<br><br>Promoting a digitally-enabled Britain is one of the core purposes of the BBC, and this will bring services like the iPlayer within the reach of many more people.<br><br>Here I would also like to pay tribute to the excellent work that Martha Lane Fox has done as the UK’s Digital Inclusion Champion and through the Race Online campaign. <br><br>Ed Vaizey and I are looking forward to working with her to extend the benefits of internet access to the 12.5 million people who are currently not benefitting from the digital revolution.<br><br>Secondly, I am announcing 3 market testing projects that will bring superfast broadband to rural and hard-to-reach areas.<br><br>These are projects that will not only benefit those living in these areas, but that will provide us with vital information about how we can best target government intervention and make next generation broadband viable in even the most challenging areas.<br><br>Broadband Delivery UK – the organisation which will be the delivery vehicle for these policies and accountable to me – will hold an industry event on 15th July to provide further details, and to describe how the procurement of these testing projects will be achieved.</p> <p>But thirdly I also want to address the biggest cost involved in rolling out new fibre optic networks: digging up the roads.<br><br>Cut these costs and, straight away, investing in superfast broadband becomes a substantially more attractive proposition.<br><br>That’s why I want companies to be able to take advantage of the infrastructure that already exists – the ducts and poles of telecoms companies, the sewers and other utility networks.<br><br>We said in our Coalition Agreement that we will require BT and other infrastructure providers to allow the use of their assets to deliver superfast broadband.<br><br>So I wholeheartedly welcome Ofcom’s proposals to open up access to BT’s ducts and telegraph poles to promote further investment – and the positive and constructive attitude BT has shown to this development.<br><br>But I would like to go further. If legislation is necessary to require other infrastructure providers to open up their assets as well, then – as announced in the Queen’s speech – I am ready to bring it to the House as soon as parliamentary time can be found.<br><br>I know there have been some interesting projects, whether by Geo in London, Fibrecity in Bournemouth and Dundee, or Virgin in Berkshire.<br><br>I want to hear from you what you have learnt from these and what the government can do to further stimulate private sector investment in next generation networks.<br><br>So we will be publishing a paper setting out our latest thinking on this at our industry event on 15th July.<br><br>On the basis of this, I will be inviting businesses interested in investing in superfast broadband to tell us how infrastructure sharing would impact on their plans. And we will then ask infrastructure owners to tell me how we can best work together to make this happen.  <br><br>Our goal is simple: within this parliament we want Britain to have the best superfast broadband network in Europe.</p> <p>The second priority area for action that I want to focus on today is local media.<br><br>As many people here will know, I have long believed that the lack of high quality local TV is one of the biggest gaps in British broadcasting.<br><br>Why? Because, ironically, in an age of globalism people feel the need for stronger not weaker connections to the communities in which they live.<br><br>And this government is committed to strengthening those ties by giving local communities far greater control over their own destinies.<br><br>That is why Eric Pickles’ department has opened up all items of local government expenditure over £500 to full transparency. <br><br>And why we support more elected mayors and elected police commissioners.<br><br>But for this to happen we need strong local media to nurture a sense of local identity and hold locally-elected politicians to account.<br><br>It happens elsewhere.<br><br>New York has 6 local TV stations – compared to London which has not one.<br><br>Birmingham Alabama, an example some of you may have heard me use before, has 8 local TV stations – despite being a quarter the size of our Birmingham that, again, doesn’t even have one.<br><br>Paris, Lyon and Marseilles have local TV. Why not Glasgow, Sheffield and Bristol?<br><br>Unfortunately even as politicians have paid lip service to localism, our broadcasting ecology has pursued the polar opposite model - with a large proportion of news beamed shamelessly from the centre.</p> <p>The six million dollar question, of course, is not about the desirability of local TV but its viability.<br><br>The local advertising market in the UK is quite different from that in the US, and this probably represents the greatest single challenge for making local TV work on a sustainable basis.<br><br>At the same time, technology has massively lowered the costs of broadcasting. It is now possible to set up a news studio for as little as £250,000.<br><br>And consumer research has shown consistently high levels of public support for local news stories.<br><br>So how do we intend to progress this ambition?<br><br>Firstly, by recognising that plans for Independently Funded News Consortia were misguided.<br><br>They had the positive benefit of stimulating new and imaginative thinking amongst local media companies for which I am grateful – and I want to carry on talking to those who submitted bids about your ideas. <br><br>But, fundamentally, they were about subsidising the existing regional news system in a way that would have blocked the emergence of new and vibrant local media models fit for the digital age.<br><br>They risked turning a whole generation of media companies into subsidy junkies, focusing all their efforts not on attracting viewers but on persuading ministers and regulators to give them more cash.<br><br>That’s why I am today announcing that the savings from the  IFNC pilots will be used instead to support the market testing plans for the roll-out of superfast broadband mentioned earlier.<br><br>Secondly, I can announce that I will be accepting Ofcom’s recommendations on reforming local cross-media ownership rules – meaning that those rules will be significantly relaxed to allow local newspapers to own local commercial radio stations and set up local TV stations as well as benefit from greater economies of scale. <br><br>But in addition I have asked Ofcom to go further and look whether we should remove all cross-media ownership rules at a local level.<br><br>Consumers are hopping freely from platform to platform. Media companies need to be able to follow their customers – and a sensible regulatory environment would allow them to do just that whilst ensuring concerns about local monopolies were sensibly addressed.<br><br>I will therefore update these rules and bring secondary legislation to the House to enact these changes this summer.<br><br>Thirdly, I want to ensure that, as government, we are doing everything we can to make new local media models viable in this country.<br><br>Local broadcasting can be supported by a number of potential sources of revenue – whether advertising, sponsorship, product placement, the sub-letting of spare capacity or carriage fees. <br><br>But I want to settle once and for all what needs to change to make local broadcasting economically viable in the UK.<br><br>So today I am announcing that I have asked Nicholas Shott, Head of UK Investment Banking at Lazard, to look at the potential for commercially viable local television stations within the local media landscape right across the nations and regions of the UK.<br><br>And I have asked Nick to look at how a modernised, updated regulatory environment could help nurture a new generation of hungry, ambitious and profitable local media companies.<br><br>Based on his findings, I will be publishing a full, local media action plan in the autumn.</p> <p>I began by saying that I have great faith and confidence in the strength of our digital and creative industries.<br><br>We are at a technological turning point of huge significance. <br><br>And because we are used to producing products of global quality and global appeal, the opportunity for us is greater than for many others. Not just to strengthen economic capital, but social and political capital as well. <br><br>Shakespeare said: “There is a tide in the affairs of men. Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.”<br><br>I want us to grasp that fortune and not be overwhelmed by the flood. <br><br>Thank you.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7132.aspx Jeremy Hunt Media keynote speech uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 08/06/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport Thank you for coming today. And thanks too to Will and The Hospital Club for hosting this event, and for all the great work they are doing to celebrate, support and nurture some of our most exciting creative talent.
<p>19 May 2010<br>The Roundhouse, London.<br></p> <p>Thank you very much for coming. And thank you to the Roundhouse for hosting today’s event.</p> <p>The last time I was here was to see La Clique, a totally brilliant reinvention of the lost art of cabaret. There are plenty of risqué moments, and in a way this is a risky moment for me as the new Culture Secretary.</p> <p>As The Guardian’s Charlotte Higgins put it to me when she sent a congratulations email: “If you hurt the arts I’ll break your legs”...</p> <p>And thrilled as I am to be Culture Secretary, as I look at the public spending round that lies ahead I do feel a bit of “uneasy lies the head that wears the crown” – what Henry IV said when he had insomnia and what I rather feel when I consider the responsibilities involved.<br><br>So let me start by saying something to reassure Charlotte, something I hope you already know which is, I am totally passionate about arts and culture in our country. It is the most incredible privilege to do what I am doing and I am unbelievably excited. </p> <p>For me culture is not just about the economic value of our creative industries – It is what defines us as a civilisation. Culture helps us understand the world around us, explain it, and sometimes escape from it – as Picasso put it: “washing the dust of daily life from our souls”.</p> <p>I want to read you the following poem written to Stalin by Russian dissident Osip Mandelstam:</p> <p>You gave me my shoe-size in earth with bars around it. <br>Where did it get you? Nowhere.<br>You left me my lips and they shape words, even in silence. </p> <p>He wrote that whilst imprisoned by Stalin, and later he died en route to a Siberian prison camp. But the incredible power of his poetry survived and I actually read that poem for the first time on the tube as one of Transport for London’s “poems on the underground” – so thank you Boris – it’s nice to have a mayor who is so committed to culture.</p> <p>I am incredibly lucky to have in my team Ed Vaizey, who is going to be a brilliant Culture Minister, and who is equally passionate about our cultural sector. </p> <p>And I want you to know that the government’s commitment to the arts goes right to the top.</p> <p>George Osborne, gave a really important keynote speech to the Tate last December in which he outlined what I hope will be some key financial reforms for helping the arts.</p> <p>David Cameron, along with his wife Samantha who has forged her career in the creative industries, is someone who has a commitment to the arts. </p> <p>And I have already spoken to David Laws, Chief Secretary to the Treasury about our budget. He fully understands all of the arguments that I am going to be making today. </p> <p>I do want to talk today about what we can do to help weather the storm. But as this is my first speech as Culture Secretary, I hope you won’t mind if I start with some broader thoughts about the role of arts and culture in society. </p> <p>I remember, in the run-up to the election, going to see Jez Butterworth’s Jerusalem at the Apollo Theatre.  </p> <p>That play could potentially be seen as a real challenge – it pits unattractive, nimby villagers against a man reviewers described as an “alcoholic, drug-dealing gypsy”. </p> <p>Liz Forgan was visibly worried when I told her I was going to see it, but she needn’t have been. It was an extraordinary performance on the concept of Englishness. </p> <p>But let’s look at the story behind the play because it represents a powerful symbol of British cultural life operating at its best.</p> <p>It was developed using a mixture of public and private investment; it came from a small, publicly-funded stage in Sloane Square then transferring to the commercial sector and bringing money back into the publicly-funded theatre that nurtured it.</p> <p>It soon became a phenomenon destined for Broadway and for worldwide success.</p> <p>A perfect example of how subsidising our cultural life is one of the best investments we can make in this country;</p> <p>And how the subsidised sector can help set our most exciting talents on the path to global commercial success.</p> <p>From the same path came talents such as Danny Boyle, who progressed from the Joint Stock Theatre Company in Birmingham to grossing $360 million worldwide with Slumdog Millionaire.</p> <p>Public money mixed with private. Cultural achievement coming together with cultural enterprise to create public wealth - both financial wealth and artistic wealth.</p> <p>But when I was watching Jerusalem – I wasn’t thinking about creative exports or leveraged investment. </p> <p>I was enjoying artistic excellence.  Art for art’s sake.</p> <p>That is my starting point as Secretary of State for Culture. </p> <p>Successive governments have nurtured that excellence with the result that Britain has one of the most vibrant, extraordinary cultural sectors in the world.# We win more Oscars than any country except America. </p> <p>And as the global spotlight falls on this country ahead of London 2012, we are ready to show the world exactly what we have to offer by staging the greatest cultural festival in a generation. <br><br>So however tough the spending round we face may be, we must never forget that our responsibility for the arts and culture – my responsibility for the arts and culture – is one that is not simply for this generation of art lovers, but for many generations to come.</p> <p>So what are the key principles which will define this government’s approach to culture and the arts?</p> <p>First principle, as I hope it’s clear, we support the mixed economy. </p> <p>One of the best things about our cultural scene is that we have managed to combine the best of European-style public support for the arts with elements of philanthropy. </p> <p>Different types of funding help support different types of creativity. Indeed our biggest cultural organisations often say that public support is one of the best possible ways of leveraging private support.</p> <p>Second principle, culture and the arts are for everyone, not just the lucky few. </p> <p>We support the policy of free admission to museums and galleries. Indeed I pay tribute to Chris Smith for battling for it and introducing it. </p> <p>We are proud of a public library network which enables everyone access to great literature, learning and information without charge, no matter where they live.</p> <p>And I really hope that, even in the tough financial environment, we develop and expand the many excellent education programmes being run by so many of our cultural organisations.</p> <p>Third principle, we support the arms length principle. </p> <p>Whilst elected ministers must hold the Arts Council to account for how they and the bodies spend taxpayers’ money, we do not want to politicise funding decisions by making ministers responsible for individual grants. That should rightly remain the remit of the Arts Council. </p> <p>Finally, we should credit the last government with the way in which arts policy has become a much more mainstream part of government policy as a whole. </p> <p>John Major created what is now DCMS and gave arts a place at the top table, but since then we have seen cultural policy take a front seat in economic, education and regeneration policy-making. </p> <p>I want that to continue.</p> <p>That’s the good news I hope.</p> <p>But now let me address the issue which I think is top of everyone’s mind, namely the tough public spending environment we now face, which will inevitably impact on the spending budget in the cultural sector. </p> <p>Putting the economy back on its feet and restoring the nation’s finances are things that are in all of our interests – not least the cultural sector which needs a public sector and private sector able to invest generously in the arts.</p> <p>For that investment in arts and culture made by the government we get a terrific bang for our buck. But the truth is that in the current climate all budgets – large and small – are going to have to be re-examined. There will be in-year cuts in the budget and a tough public spending settlement for the next three years.</p> <p>But what I can promise you is this: culture will not be singled out as a soft target. </p> <p>And we will be open, fair and as quick as possible in letting people know what their funding settlement will be for the next spending round.</p> <p>Ed and I will champion the value culture brings – economic value, value to society and to individuals, value as a nurturing ground for the creative industries. </p> <p>And I can also promise that, in any discussions over spending, cuts in administration and bureaucracy will always be considered ahead of decisions that could affect creative output. </p> <p>That’s why one of David Cameron’s first decisions as Prime Minister was to cut ministerial pay by 5%. And my first decision as Secretary of State was to cancel all ministerial cars – saving £250,000 per annum. On top of this I have asked every employee in my department to come up with one idea how we can save money from our own budget as part of a project headed by John Penrose.</p> <p>I congratulate the Arts Council who will reduce their operating costs to 6.6% this year – meaning savings of £6.5 million.</p> <p>But I want all of us to go even further, which is why I am asking all grant-giving organisations to reduce their admin costs to 5% of the budgets they distribute. </p> <p>We must be able to look artists and arts organisations in the eye and assure them that no grants have been withdrawn because too much money is getting lost in the system. </p> <p>But with your support I want to turn the current funding crisis into an opportunity.</p> <p>An opportunity to reform the way arts are funded in this country so that never again are they so vulnerable to a sudden boom and bust in funding.</p> <p>So I have started a major project to look at how we can be better at helping you to tap into other sources of funding. Not as a replacement to public funding, but as an additional pillar of support.</p> <p>This is not a short term project or a gimmick. I believe it will be a twenty year strategy to open up new streams of funding and change the culture of giving in this country.</p> <p>The first major change that I am announcing today is a reform to the National Lottery.</p> <p>I say “reform”, but of course I really mean “restore”. Because I want to get the lottery back to how it was first conceived by John Major in 1994. </p> <p>Since then, the lottery has generated £8 billion for heritage and the arts. But over the past ten years it has lost its way – funding schemes that do not fall within the four original good causes. </p> <p>That’s why I will restore arts and heritage, as well as grass roots sport, to their original 20% shares of National Lottery good cause funding. </p> <p>And, because I want to see a rise in the amount going to voluntary and community organisations, I will make sure that those funds are protected and the Big Lottery Fund focuses its support exclusively on that sector. </p> <p>It is a change that will happen progressively between now and 2012, and I intend to lay an Order before parliament to implement it before the end of September.</p> <p>We will also be progressing plans to replace the system of lottery taxation to a gross profits tax basis which will raise millions extra for lottery good causes.</p> <p>Ultimately these changes will provide in excess of £100 million each year for arts and heritage – £50 million each – a figure that will be even higher once the lottery ceases to fund its share of the Olympics and its cultural festival.</p> <p>The second major change I want to set out today is a longer term one and it’s one I’m going to need the help and support of everyone in this room – and that’s philanthropy.</p> <p>At its heart is a cultural shift that chimes with all of David Cameron’s ideas on social responsibility – one that draws on and enhances the culture of giving in this country.</p> <p>And I want to say thank you.  Even in the face of the recession, private sector support for culture totalled £655 million last year. To all those who give to culture, whatever the size of your donations, I want to say thank you.</p> <p>In fact, I have today written to the country’s top 200 cultural donors to thank them for what they have done and ask for their advice as to how we can nurture more giving. </p> <p>Less than 3% of charitable giving in this country goes to cultural bodies, too many of whom are still constrained by their dependence on public subsidy. And only 8% of cultural organisations have a legacy programme, so much more can be done.</p> <p>And I particularly want to help smaller organisations to help themselves by strengthening fundraising capacity across the cultural sector. </p> <p>There are three areas of action that I want to highlight today that can help us manage this shift to a society with a deeper commitment to cultural philanthropy.</p> <p>First, the reform of Gift Aid.</p> <p>The current regime is not working as hard as it could to stimulate giving to culture. It should be simpler and easier to give, and for cultural bodies to thank and recognise their donors in an appropriate manner.</p> <p>Of course, we already have a tax relief that has played a huge role in enhancing the collections of museums and galleries across the country: the Acceptance in Lieu scheme. </p> <p>For a hundred years now, this scheme has allowed the transfer of important heritage assets into public ownership in lieu of liability to inheritance tax and estate duties.  Most recently is the acquisition of the archive of JG Ballard. </p> <p>Thirdly, I know that many of you work in an environment where you need to commission and plan productions, programmes, exhibitions and tours several years in advance.</p> <p>Where it would help you to plan with the assurance of long-term funding, I believe government should offer that support.</p> <p>I want to reward high-performing organisations by moving to longer-term funding settlements that would allow you to plan with greater confidence, and would reassure donors and sponsors that their support would complement sustained public sector investment. </p> <p>These could be for five years, or for even longer. And they could help those organisations which already have, or want to develop, endowments.</p> <p>I would like to see major cultural organisations receiving these agreements in return for coming forward with even more ambitious fundraising programmes than you currently have.</p> <p>Finally a word about the role of arts in education.</p> <p>I remember being made to sit through the entire cycle of The Ring at the age of 11 by a rather zealous music teacher. It was hard going. But maybe, just maybe, he planted in me a seed that has given me a love of music that has lasted with me to this day.</p> <p>The tragedy is that for so many children that simply doesn’t happen.</p> <p>We need to win the argument with the education establishment that music and art education is not simply something that is “nice to do if you can”. Not just a distraction from literacy and numeracy targets, but something to help you achieve literacy and numeracy targets. </p> <p>Research has shown that learning to play an instrument actually enhances the ability to remember words, meaning that musically trained students can remember 17% more verbal information that those without musical training.</p> <p>Working with Michael Gove, I want to ensure that the superb cultural offer available in some of our state schools is available in them all.</p> <p>We have also suffered in arts education from a plethora of well-meaning initiatives. </p> <p>So we will aim for a simpler, more streamlined approach which recognises the need for a disciplined approach to the acquisition of skills as the foundation of creativity. </p> <p>Grayson Perry spoke to the Royal Philharmonic Society last week about the “insanely difficult” things that artists do, and that it takes 10,000 hours to achieve excellence in any field. <br> <br>I have been in this job for only 10,000 minutes so I hope you will bear with me as I learn the ropes.  I can only promise that I intend to do the very best for culture and the arts in this country, to keep listening to everyone in this room, and – hopefully – to emerge with my legs intact.<br></p> <p>Thank you.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7069.aspx Jeremy Hunt Arts keynote speech uk.org.publicwhip/member/1859 19/05/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport
<p>6th July 2011 <br>London<br><br>CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY </p> <p>I was interested to see that the theme for your AGM this year is Music Everywhere, and who can seriously doubt that music is more ubiquitous than ever before. </p> <p>And this is particularly true of British music at the moment. In March, for the first time in over 25 years, the top three spots in the US album charts being held by UK artists – Adele, Marsha Ambrosius and Mumford and Sons.  We have a 12% share of global sales of recorded music, and in its 20th year the Brit School keeps on delivering inspiring new talent. This is a tremendous achievement that reflects the diversity and depth of talent that marks us out on the world stage and should give us enormous optimism for the future. </p> <p>The music industry has been the canary in the mine in the digital age.  Few canaries volunteer for the job, and music was the first content sector to meet the blizzard conditions of the Internet.  It is not surprising that the record business have taken time to adapt.</p> <p>So, inevitably sometimes the focus was wrong.  Hindsight makes us all geniuses. Again, as a politician I can sympathise.  It’s curious that so many people now say they would have got it right if you believe reports after the event.<br>I know that the music industry does accept that mistakes were made, and opportunities missed, but I now think it is keenest of all the traditional entertainment sectors to make the future work.</p> <p>I think that it is very encouraging that there are clear signs from ISPs, search engines and others that they do recognise the central role that music has in driving other business.  Consumers will increasingly expect there to be a music offering alongside more prosaic applications.  The trick, of course, is to ensure that they also expect to pay a fair price for such a service.</p> <p>Whatever the history between the music and communications sectors – and there is nothing wrong with a bit of creative tension here – we are already in enlightened self-interest territory.  And enlightened self-interest can accomplish surprising things.</p> <p>But it also cuts both ways. It means that the music industry must embrace a state of continuous change that can be uncomfortable.  Most of the people from the industry I have spoken to recognise that, and are up for the challenge.</p> <p>What I know makes people angry is that radical change has to be undertaken against a background noise of infringement. What more than irks are the apologists for infringement, those who assert that copyright itself is an outmoded conspiracy, designed to put money into the pockets of corporations at the expense of ordinary people and so called “real artists”. Supposedly you can’t be a real artist and make real money.</p> <p>Such people tend to make a lot of noise, but little of it is constructive. Music, and other creative products, will not survive on user generated content alone. It is important to note that UK composers, performers and producers work hard for what they do and deserve to be rewarded.</p> <p>Without doubt some talent will emerge from the online cacophony, and some already has. Some future stars may even be lucky enough to be taken under Simon Cowell’s wing, and good luck to them. But let’s not kid ourselves.  99% of the time it takes real investment.</p> <p>Investment in discovering talent, developing artists, guiding their careers, and making the end result attractive to the public.<br>Who does that?  Well, it’s certainly not online music industry critics.  The reason the record industry remains such an important element in the music industry as a whole is that it is they who take the risk in nurturing talent in the hope that they will be one of the successes that pays for the overall effort.  </p> <p>Nobody is pretending that this is done from selfless motives, or that it works well in every individual case – but without it the whole thing becomes a total lottery, and many talented voices would never have been heard against the competing crowd.</p> <p>Revenues of UK record labels have fallen by a third since 2004. We recognise that as the record industry is squeezed and this investment in the future that is put at risk, help is needed now. It is not to protect the industry as it is now, nor protect vested interests, but to help ensure that it can evolve into the industry that we will still need in the future.</p> <p>Government has a role here.  Not as a cheerleader for any particular sector but as a protector of the creative industries.  One of the things the Government is good at, and which it does not take enough credit for, is bringing people together. <br>Discussions in a neutral venue can lead to more promising commercial negotiations.  I am told generally people are more polite when Ministers are there.</p> <p>We rightly stay well outside anything impinging on competition, but those who have worked with me will know that I love a roundtable, and I know that some of these have been valuable.  </p> <p>Government also has responsibility for setting the legislative framework, and ensuring that it remains both effective and fit for the future.</p> <p>Nevertheless, the road ahead is now clearer, assuming that the continuing efforts of BT and Talk Talk come to nought. <br>I understand your concern that this happens as fast as possible, with minimal costs, and we do intend to make clear our intentions about the Act before too long.  <br><br>If it seems this has been a slow process there has been a genuine reason for it.  We want to get the road ahead absolutely clear so when the Act is implemented it goes as smoothly as possible.</p> <p>One thing that I would say to this audience is that in order to ensure that the initial obligations are up and running as soon as possible we need Ofcom to have all the information they need – and that includes rights holder budgets.  I know that this may a sensitive point, but the less reason for delay, on all sides, the better.</p> <p>The initial obligations are designed to reduce unlawful peer-to-peer file-sharing, but this is not the only threat, which is why we set up the working group on site-blocking to which the BPI has actively contributed.  That has done some promising work.</p> <p>And we will publish Ofcom’s report into the workability of sections 17 and 18 of the DEA shortly, and our reaction to it.</p> <p>I should also say something about the Hargreaves review.  The review holds up some challenges and some opportunities for your industry.</p> <p>The Digital Copyright Exchange could, potentially, be a game-changer.  Open, transparent and efficient markets for copyright licensing could help drive new services and outlets, and cut costs for existing ones and rights-holders.  That should mean bigger markets and more solid margins.  I’m not saying the Digital Copyright Exchange would be easy but Hargreaves paints a vivid picture of the potential benefits.  Ian Hargreaves was very clear that the exchange would be viable only if copyright owners saw the benefits.</p> <p>I don’t want to underestimate the challenges that an exchange would provide, but I do think that the music industry would have a lot to gain and a strong start, given the work already going on to develop good databases of content.  So, whatever the Government decides about the exchange, there is an opportunity there for you.</p> <p>I know that many here will also hold strong views about the recommendations on copyright exceptions.  Let’s wait until Government responds to debate that. But we are strongly aware of the need to balance the valid and competing interests, while making sure the UK does not fall behind.</p> <p>And while we are in the area of copyright, I would just like to add that the Government will continue to support moves in Europe to extend copyright in sound recordings.</p> <p>To really embrace “music everywhere”, we need to look seriously at the current legal situation.  A consumer’s normal and reasonable use of an iPod should not be something we try to discourage or regulate.  Make life too difficult for customers and we will just have “music nowhere”, which is not in anyone’s benefit.</p> <p>We also want to give your industry more support to grow and prosper overseas.  To do this the Government will be creating an IP Attaché network – starting with China and India in 2011 followed by Eastern Asia and the Americas in 2012.  We will be increasing our offering of products and information to business in order to help them protect their IP overseas. <br><br>And we will be actively engaging within Europe to influence their approach on key issues, like the new EU Intellectual Property Rights strategy and EU-led international trade negotiations.</p> <p>But as a general rule industry should never wait for Government.  I cannot stress enough that rather than hang about waiting for the next legislative bus, the music industry must grasp all the business opportunities that are emerging.</p> <p>There are already around 70 online music services in this country, and business is growing strongly, with revenue from subscription services rising by 38% last year.  I am delighted that Virgin has announced its deal with Spotify.  I hope that will be a game-changer with a major ISP offering a streaming service to its customers.  I hope other ISPs will take note and follow Virgin’s example.</p> <p>I know many of you agree that we must not rely on enforcement alone - that is never going to be enough.  ISPs have their role to play in helping their users to find legitimate content. Let’s remember that the majority of people do not infringe, but are looking for ways to hear music in ways that they want to.  <br><br>And the majority of those that do infringe can be persuaded to stop, if they are not made to feel they are the losers here.</p> <p>It is also about getting young people into the habit of getting their music legitimately. If you can attract the student to paid-for content, then he is probably your customer for life.</p> <p>The whole point about music is that it is exciting, and I’m delighted to see the launch of Next BRIT Thing. This came from the idea, conceived by the Prime Minister and Gary Barlow, to create a new music competition for young people.</p> <p>Music is clearly a great vehicle to engage, enthuse and inspire young people and the Next BRIT Thing will provide a platform to encourage young people to share their music and showcase the best that the UK has to offer.</p> <p>We’ve been working really closely with Geoff (Taylor), Tony (Wadsworth), Lesley (Douglas) and Nick (Williams) to get it off the ground, and I’d like to take this opportunity to thank you for your help in making it happen too, through access to artists, mentors, judges and prizes. If you’ve not already pledged your support I suggest you have a word with Geoff at some point today to make sure you aren’t the odd one out.  </p> <p>The Next BRIT Thing is a major new nationwide initiative and is a brilliant example of what we can do when government and industry work together.  </p> <p>The UK needs a system that supports open markets, with free competition between services using different devices, giving clarity to rights-holders and consumers, without creating unfair barriers to innovative products and services.</p> <p>The Government recognises the importance of the music industry and congratulates the British music industry on its success, and appreciates the challenges it is facing.  The future of the music industry lies in the judicious mix of protection of intellectual property rights and innovation in the digital age.</p> <p>Thank you.</p> <p>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8274.aspx Edward Vaizey Keynote speech to BPI AGM uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 06/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY
<p>Tuesday 5 July 2011<br>Intellect Conference, London</p> <p>Thank you to Intellect for inviting me back to speak.  </p> <p>I came to this conference last year, as a fresh faced Minister with an ambition for digital radio.   That ambition remains, but today I want to share with you the Government’s ambition across the wider digital space as well. </p> <p>The UK has one of the most dynamic and successful media and communications sectors in the world.   According to a report from the Boston Consulting Group, the UK is now the world leader in e-commerce, with an internet economy worth £100 billion a year.  The availability of enhanced 3G for mobile data transfer is at almost 90 per cent of the total population.  Our content sectors continue to thrive with international sales of TV content exports growing to over £1.3billion in 2009.  Indeed the broadcast content sector invested around £250m on UK commissions in 2009.<br><br>We have built on this success with initiatives such as East London Tech City that is helping to support the creation of a world leading technology centre in East London. Hailed as the “Digital Capital of Europe” Tech City has become a tremendous attraction to ambitious young technology entrepreneurs making it increasingly the place to be for the world’s next generation of digital entrepreneurs. The success here has attracted other like-minded high-tech entrepreneurs and the area is booming. </p> <p><strong>Communications Review<br></strong>  <br>Our job as Government is to maintain and enhance this success by creating a regulatory environment that is fit for purpose.  I am genuinely open- minded about how we should do this. I have been clear that we are willing to hear all ideas and solutions.  The regulatory framework that we put in place must reflect the convergence we are seeing in both content and infrastructure – and it must be dynamic and flexible enough to keep up with the pace of change we are seeing in these markets. <br> <br>This conference is about the ‘Future of Digital Entertainment’.  What I find interesting is that ‘digital entertainment’ is now almost impossible to define.  Ofcom’s communications market report revealed that nearly half of people’s waking hours are spent using media content and communications services.  But that can mean almost anything, from watching a film on your iPad at home to checking your twitter feed on the bus on the way to work.  Almost all of us now have, in effect, a digital identity which we access and interact with through a myriad of devices.   </p> <p>That places a huge challenge on policy makers, used to an analogue world of regulation, where a certain amount of top down control could be maintained.  That is becoming increasingly difficult.  Control is effectively moving to the consumer.  I suspect the challenge for Government now is how to put in place “bottom up” regulation – regulation that can genuinely give the consumer control over the issues that concern them most, such as privacy, security and protecting their family from inappropriate content.</p> <p>But it is also essential that we have an environment that lets you continue to innovate and create new products and services.  I am also instinctively and intellectually drawn to solutions that do not require statutory regulation.  Where it is appropriate and achievable we should look to market and industry led solutions, which by definition will be more flexible and more bespoke.</p> <p>This means that your involvement in the process is vital.  As you know, to kick-start this process we published our open letter on the Communications Review in May. I am heartened by the 130 responses we have received through this process. </p> <p>I want to be clear that this is not the end of the process but the beginning of a dialogue with you.  We will be publishing a green paper before the end of this year which will set out the Government’s initial policy objectives and proposals.  This will then lead to a White Paper some time in 2012, and legislation beyond that.   But we will continue to engage with you and change and adapt our ideas with you.<br>  <br><strong>Broadband, Spectrum, TV Switchover<br><br></strong>In the meantime, there is a lot that we can be getting on with.  <br><br>In the UK, 99.6% of population can access Broadband and over 70% actually use it.  We’re pursuing ambitious plans to bring our infrastructure up to speed for a new digital age.  We will ensure that 90% of the population have superfast broadband links by 2015 to greater than 24Mbps, and that there is universal coverage.  The market will deliver the majority of this, but we have set aside more than £500 million to assist rollout.<br><br>It is also critical to the future of broadband that we are able to auction new spectrum at the beginning of next year, and we intend to ensure that this happens.  The process has been delayed for far too long and it is now critical that we progress.</p> <p>The Digital TV Switchover programme continues apace, with a third of UK homes, including all of Scotland and Wales, successfully switching over. The remaining regions, including London in April next year, are all fully on track to be completed by the end of 2012.<br>The programme has, so far, been a model of how well the Industry can work together to achieve a common goal.</p> <p>By 2015, we will be firmly on the path to being a fully digital nation.  Television switchover will have been successfully completed in 2012.  Our broadband infrastructure will be the best in Europe. And with a following wind, we should have 4G services running in a competitive mobile market place.<br><br><strong>Radio</strong></p> <p>As promised earlier, let me now turn specifically to digital radio</p> <p>This time last year my ambition for radio was defined by digital, and the opportunities digital offered radio to grow, innovate and engage.  By launching the Digital Radio Action Plan, I committed to a switchover programme and a programme of work which would allow digital radio to unlock its potential. </p> <p>Last year, I set out the barriers to realising radio’s digital future around 5 C’s: Content, Consumers, Coverage, Cars and Certainty. These barriers remain valid today, although we have chipped away at them and are on a path to knock them down. There have been some significant changes in the last year.  </p> <p>On content, we have seen the launch of the RadioPlayer which has brought together in one place live radio, on demand and podcasts from hundreds of UK radio stations.  A brilliant example of the innovations that can be achieved when industry works together. </p> <p>The BBC has re-branded BBC 7 as BBC 4 Extra, with extended versions of well-loved Radio 4 programmes. On Saturday mornings Adam and Joe have returned to 6Music and that, for some, is reason enough to buy a new digital radio.  </p> <p>The commercial sector has also played its part with the launch of new services such as Absolute 90s and 00’s, and Jazz FM and Smooth have become national digital services.    </p> <p>On cars, the move to include digital radio as standard in new vehicles has continued over the last year.  Around 14% of new vehicles have DAB as standard, up from 4% a year ago.  Ford have announced that all their vehicles will be DAB as standard by the end of 2012, while BMW and Vauxhall have made similar positive announcements. I welcome these commitments and the efforts that vehicle manufacturers have made in this area. </p> <p>These all represent good progress, but they are not yet transformational progress.  There are still challenges to overcome.  </p> <p>Consumers remain absolutely central to our considerations around a Digital Radio Switchover, and I know that many of you in this room have been working closely together under the Action Plan to ensure the needs of consumers, in particular some of the most vulnerable members of society, are met.</p> <p>We have made excellent progress in establishing a minimum specification for domestic and in-vehicle receivers, and in considering the specific usability needs of people with disabilities and older people.</p> <p>On coverage, two weeks ago, Ofcom published their consultation which set out how DAB can be built-out to current FM levels.  This shows that is both a realistic and achievable ambition. </p> <p>We are working closely with the multiplex operators and broadcasters to agree the funding mechanisms and timetable for the build-out of local DAB.  We remain confident that agreement can be reached and that the necessary build-out of the local and national DAB platforms will be made to support a positive switchover decision.    <br> <br>So we have achieved a lot against our ambition for Radio but there is still much to do.  We are still on course for a decision on switchover in 2013.  We should by then have a clear plan to create FM equivalent coverage, with costings; in-vehicle digital will be the norm; hopefully every radio sold by our major retailers will have digital capability; and the content proposition for digital will have continued to improve.</p> <p>As for the communications review we are just beginning. The deadline for open letter responses has passed but really it is just start of the story.  Many of you will have strong views on how the regulatory structures should be shaped – we are still listening.  Once our Green paper has been published we will hold a full public consultation on our options we need you to be solution focused not just for your individual companies but for the whole of the UK Communications sector. </p> <p>Thank you.<br><br>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8271.aspx Edward Vaizey ‘The future of digital entertainment’ uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 05/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport Intellect Conference, London
<p>Wednesday 29 June 2011<br>OECD HQ, Paris</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8265.aspx Edward Vaizey Internet speech at OECD conference uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 29/06/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport OECD HQ, Paris
<p>Tuesday 21 June 2011<br>London</p> <p>Thank you for inviting me to speak today. I am delighted to be here this morning.</p> <p>I am the Minister responsible for libraries, and you may be surprised to find me in a positive mood.  That’s because I am here today to talk about some of the fantastic work that is going on in libraries all across the country.</p> <p>Only last week I was happy to endorse Westminster, Hammersmith &amp; Fulham and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea councils’ proposals to combine library services, saving taxpayers more than £1million a year and ensuring all of their 21 public libraries remain safe from closure.   This has to be good news all round.  We really do need to see much much more of this type of merger, saving back-office costs to protect the front-line.</p> <p>Last month Hillingdon library service won the Booksellers’ Library Innovation of the Year Award. I know not everyone’s been a fan of Hillingdon but there’s no arguing with the facts. At a time when many library authorities are considering closures of branches their service is so successful – it received a record number of visitors last year – that it’s undertaking a programme of library refurbishment instead of library closures.</p> <p> And Hillingdon isn’t alone. Windsor &amp; Maidenhead announced in February that a new library will be built to serve residents in the North West of the Royal Borough who they felt were having to travel too far to access library services. This responsiveness to the needs of residents is exactly what must underpin all local authority library authorities.</p> <p>And there’s more.  Last week, Lancashire Library Service celebrated "Carers' Week" across the county by providing lots of information at number of libraries regarding services and activities available for carers, aiming to increase opportunities for carers with emphasis given to issues of health, employment, education and leisure.  <br>As well as integrated social service provision, Lancashire also has an exemplary partnership with the University of Central Lancashire which sponsors of the Lancashire Children's Book Award – 10 books on the shortlist this year- “as a university dedicated to lifelong learning, we are pleased to be associated with an Award that encourages enthusiasm for reading and critical judgement in equal measure”. </p> <p>In Newcastle, Jesmond Library re-opened last week following a two-month, refurbishment to make the 1960s Grade II building more accessible.  Improvements also include self-service terminals, automatic entrance doors, a larger community room with kitchen facilities, an accessible public toilet, new flooring, layout and lighting – and £5,000 of new stock. <br>And of course Nicky Parker.  Manchester library services are widely recognised and acknowledged as an exemplar of diverse service provision.  Like many aurhorities, I know you have run a consultation on future library provision, having in the past year up-graded many of your existing libraries.  I have looked at your services Facebook page, I was heartened to see that over 2000 visitors had taken the video tour of the Central Library “Into the Stacks” is possibly the speediest tour of library shelves I have seen, but exactly illustrates not only different ways of accessing the library, but also the potential to reach non-library visitors.</p> <p>These are exciting developments, and there are many more up and down the country that I dont have time to tell you about today.  By the way, a lot of this success is not about money.  It is about passion and imagination, about realising the the public library service in an area is a huge asset to be exploited, not a burden to be got rid of.</p> <p>I have now been Minister for over a year, and it has been important to engage with the sector at every level - I have had numerous meetings with various stakeholders on public library issues, engaged closely with the MLA, and also brought the Local Government Group much closer to Government through the Future Libraries Programme.  I have discussed libraries with publishers, booksellers, the British Library and digital champion Martha Lane Fox.  I’ve visited numerous library authorities, carrying on the work I was doing in Opposition, and even opened new libraries!  </p> <p>In fact my first speech as a Minister was on libraries, and the Future Libraries Programme was the first programme I launched as a Minister.</p> <p>Of course, as far as public libraries are concerned, the only media story at the moment are the proposed closures of libraries in several local authorities.  Quite rightly in my view, local campaigners are letting their voices be heard.  There are calls for me to intervene by “calling in” these cases with the powers Ministers have under the Public Libraries Act.  I have said again and again that I will not shy away from doing so if there is a case for it.</p> <p>I have not done so yet for two reasons.</p> <p>First this is a fluid situation.  Authorities that have announced widespread closures have since reversed their proposals – precisely as a result of those local campaigns I have just mentioned.  Campaigning does work. <br>  <br>Secondly, I think it is far better to have a dialogue with authorities before we press the nuclear button that is “call-in”.  So my officials have met five authorities to discuss their plans – and also met the campaigners from those local areas as well.   <br>And these are useful, constructive meetings – one campaigner was kind enough to e-mail me following a meeting in the department with my officials to say  “I am very grateful, and found them to be very pleasant , helpful , and they listened”.  And we are listening. </p> <p>So why don’t I meet campaigners or individual authorities personally ?  Simple – I might be involved in any final decision on call-in, and my decision could be seen to be prejudiced if I had met an authority or a group of campaigners prior to making that decision.  </p> <p>I am here as a backstop.  My powers allow me to prevent a local authority breaching its statutory duty.  But let me be clear.  I do not run library services.  Local authorities do.  And as democratically elected representatives, they have the right to configure library services in the way they believe best meets local needs.</p> <p>So what is the future for library services?</p> <p>I recognise that for a number of authorities, the review of service provision has enabled you to do a root and branch assessment of your library service and introduce provision and ways of working which you’d previously had ambitions for but not impetus.  I understand the arguments. If half your libraries account for just over 10% of your visits, rationalisation is an option you might consider. </p> <p>But you have to take library users with you. Intelligent people will understand your reasoning if you are open and honest with them. Carry out some meaningful consultation with your residents and you might find they come up with some ideas you hadn’t thought of.</p> <p>There are creative means to manage resources and one option may be to consider if a community supported library would be not just a viable alternative, but actually a better one.  A small library which is open just a couple of days a week under local authority control could easily become a vibrant community hub open for far longer, if the local communtiy is invited in to help run it.  </p> <p>The key for me is that councils continue to support community libraries with a core service – they don’t simply hand over Library services and turn their back.  That means access to book stock, equuipment, training, and the services of a professional librarian for a specific amount of time.  </p> <p>MLA has now produced a document, Community Managed Libraries, which offers advice on some key issues which may be helpful to those of you who are considering this option.   I’d like to thank all those authorities that shared their experience of community libraries with MLA earlier this year.</p> <p>In October responsibility for development and improvement of public library services will transfer from MLA to Arts Council England.  MLA has done good work supporting you over its lifetime and I’m sure ACE will carry this on. We’re already talking to them about the potential for another Future Libraries Programme and I’ve got a few more ideas that we need to explore.</p> <p>What I think we need to realise from this merger of the MLA and ACE is that for the first time cultural and library services will be joined-up.  ACE will be able to work with local authorities across the piece, and use its extensive regional network to raise the profile of libraries and link them with the kind of community services that cultural organisations are able to offer on a local level.</p> <p>There will be other opportunities as well.  There’s no reason why a library service couldn’t apply for an award from Grants for the Arts, to run a specific cultural programme in Libraries. When cultural organisation applied in the past,I bet they never thought of including libraries.  Now, hopefully, they will.</p> <p>ACE has also launched its digital innovation fund.  Again, there is no reason a library service couldn’t  apply to that in future, to pioneer some digital innovation project in their libraries – perhaps a telecast of opera, dance or theatre in libraries in the evenings.</p> <p>Talking of which, I really think we might be able to do more to help get all our libraries Wi-Fi enabled - the public library has always been the hub for access to knowledge, but today vast amounts of information are also available on the Internet.  Using their own devices, library users may be able to log in to a wireless network in their local library, combining the richness of the Internet with the physical books and collections at their disposal. </p> <p>And we do need to make progress on e-lending, to see if we can make that an offer that is available easily nationwide.</p> <p>Quite rightly, a lot of the debate over the last year has been about threats to libraries.  The campaigns have raised the profile of libraries, and led to many being saved.</p> <p>But it is important to talk about the opportunities for libraries.</p> <p>About the library services that are not just surviving but thriving.</p> <p>About the opportunities presented by a joined up offer from museums, cultural organisations and libraries under the Arts Council.</p> <p>About the opportunities of using technology to attract new users, but also to give existing users a different experience.</p> <p>I will continue to work with library authorities, charities and stakeholders, to listen and engage, to protect library services where I need to, but to push them forward as well. </p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8242.aspx Edward Vaizey Central London conference of libraries uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 21/06/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport London
<p>Tuesday 10 May 2011<br>National Gallery, London</p> <p>Thank you Stephen for your introduction and for inviting me to speak today at this important seminar. I am happy to take questions from the floor in a few minutes. </p> <p>Before that however, I would like to set out some of my thoughts on the issue of deaccessioning and disposal from our museums – why I would advise museums to think carefully about the reasons behind and the implications of any disposal, but also why I think now is a good time to think about making our collections work harder, to share them more widely and to use them creatively to generate income. </p> <p>This is a controversial subject that has been hotly debated for a number of years and is now increasingly under the spotlight, particularly given recent incidents where the proposed sale of items from within local authority museum collections has come under fierce scrutiny and strong debate.  The current case in Bolton, for instance, presents some difficult questions about how collections should be managed.  </p> <p>Of course, the national museums’ governing statutes rightly place the responsibilities for their collections with their trustees, who are legally responsible for the collections in their care. The national museums are only able to dispose of items under particular – and very limited – circumstances, such as if the museum holds a duplicate object or if the object has been damaged.  And generally they must not dispose of any item given as a gift or bequest.  </p> <p>I know that there is the valid point that it is unsustainable for museums to continually collect objects without any consideration of disposal or the transfer of some items. Museums need to think very carefully about their collections management policies.  And it can be a demanding juggling act in preserving the collection, whilst also making it fresh and relevant. </p> <p>There has certainly been a much more open and constructive debate about de-accessioning in recent years. There have been the reforms to the Museums Association Code of Ethics, recognising that disposal may sometimes be necessary to ensure the sustainability of museum collections. I know these were widely welcomed by museums professionals. </p> <p>Rather than dismissing any circumstances in which a disposal may be considered, the revised Code provided a pragmatic approach, whereby works might on occasion be removed from a collection, but based on a fully transparent set of guidelines.</p> <p>That Code of Ethics, however, makes it clear that there is a general presumption in favour of the retention of items within the public domain. What it is categorical in saying is that disposal principally for financial reasons should not be undertaken, or only in exceptional circumstances and where it will significantly improve the long-term public benefit of the remaining collection.  In other words it has to be in the public interest, not for the commercial advantage of any one party. </p> <p>There is ultimately a concern that the sale of collections might be seen as a stratagem for falling revenues and a justifiable means of dealing with the challenges of the current economic climate. As has been said elsewhere, collections should not be seen as a kind of financial larder to be raided whenever times are hard. </p> <p>Institutions have to consider the full ramifications of disposals. Any disposal construed as financially motivated undoubtedly damages public confidence in institutions which have been entrusted by us with maintaining collections for the benefit of the public. Many of our collections are the result of the generosity of benefactors whose gift was made with the specific understanding that it would be held in perpetuity for the good of the nation. </p> <p>If institutions are seen to not be entirely ethical in the disposal of any items this could present significant deterrents with regard to future legacies and bequests which could have a negative impact on the growth and vitality of our public collections. This would be extremely unwelcome at a time when we are all keen to encourage philanthropy. </p> <p>And let us not forget that a number of our wonderful public collections would not exist had it not been for generous benefactors. I am thinking for example of the generous loan of Domenichino’s St John the Evangelist to the National Gallery which was saved from export by a recent private purchaser , or Jonathan Ruffer’s magnificent offer to create a trust to retain the Church of England’s twelve paintings by Zurbarán in Auckland Castle.   </p> <p>Think of the Arts Council Collection, a public collection of post-war and contemporary British art, a highly respected collection to which artists, dealers and collectors regularly offer to donate works, a sign of its reputation and recognition of the important role it plays in developing audiences across the country. </p> <p>Museums need to consider that contravention of the Code of Ethics can lead to the withdrawal of a museum’s formal Accreditation by the MLA, and could also lead to the removal of Museum Association membership. </p> <p>The loss of Accreditation can have an adverse effect on the reputation and credibility with funding agencies and their eligibility for support from other public services, the national lottery or private sector funding.  It can also damage their relationship with their peers in other institutions -the sort of implications that cannot be taken lightly in thinking about the long-term sustainability of a collection. </p> <p>Whilst I believe that decisions about local authority managed collections must be taken at the local level, I would always encourage all Local Authorities to carefully weigh all the relevant factors before selling any works of art which, once gone, can never be replaced.  So the message must be to avoid applying short-term solutions that can have a long-term damaging legacy.</p> <p>I would suggest caution needs to be applied whenever de-accessioning is under consideration. This is because of:</p> <p>a) Fashionability.  An item that may be considered unfashionable and of little relevance today and disposed of on that basis, can easily come back into favour. Can we really be utterly confident in putting a price today on something which might become highly valued  by  future generations, or in predicting future trends? Particularly if that choice is being dictated by financial considerations. One man’s junk is another’s treasure trove. </p> <p>b) As I have said earlier, what it might mean for gifts and bequests.  Donors are likely to be very reluctant to give to museums and galleries who have any sort of history in selling off items in the collection. We know that those museums who have considered doing so have attracted a considerable amount of negative publicity.  It is difficult to think a donor would select such an institution to benefit from any gift.</p> <p>c) Institutions need to avoid cherrypicking – selling the best parts of its collection to raise the most money. A disaster both for the institution itself and for the public today, who may see items within a collection they have enjoyed suddenly disappearing, and for those in the future who have been deprived of access to the best works of art. </p> <p>Despite this important note of caution, I welcome the debate on disposal and deaccession. Whilst wanting to discourage the sale of items, I would like museums to think about making collections work harder.  I suggest they need to be far more innovative in ensuring that publicly owned collections are shared more widely, for example through both long and short term loans. I know that institutions have been looking at this. </p> <p>But now I want museums to think about their loans policy a bit more radically. I would like to see more loans to other museums, or institutions being much more inventive in the way they loan material, for example extending offers to loan to schools, universities or even local businesses, where they can be sure of being seen by plenty of people.</p> <p>I know that the Royal Armouries has some really innovative plans to make its collection work hard, not only to generate income for the museum but to raise its profile internationally. The Armouries already operates a semi-permanent gallery in the US and is looking to expand these galleries across North America which will generate income for the museum through educational programmes, retail opportunities and fundraising events. It is also planning a major travelling exhibition to museums across the States and Canada. Whilst taking care to have a careful loan policy and ensure that collections of significance are available to people in the UK, the collection will work hard to bring back income for museum and the British public. </p> <p>I had the opportunity recently to officially open the stunning exhibition Spencer’s War: The Art of Shipbuilding on the Clyde at the Stanley Spencer Gallery in his native Cookham (a gallery entirely run by dedicated volunteers, incidentally). The exhibition included five works on loan to the Gallery from the Imperial War Museum- a greatly valued addition. </p> <p>I said then and say now that I would certainly encourage the national museums and galleries to loan more of their works to regional exhibitions such as this. The fact that this loan was to a Gallery devoted to Spencer’s works in the place that he so loved makes it that much more significant and welcome. A really inspirational use of a national institution’s collection. </p> <p>I know that there has been a lot of passionate discussion lately about the Lowry works owned by the Tate and not on display. Passionate because Lowry is greatly admired by many. Surely the only rent collector ever to be held in such affection. Whilst I certainly can’t agree that these works should be up for sale as I think has been one of the suggestions, I would say that making them accessible perhaps through a regional loan would be a positive move and one that would certainly be a popular one. </p> <p>Can I also add that I am a big fan of exploiting the wonderful tools offered by modern technology -digitising collections to increase access and engage audiences, as well as the contribution this can make to scholarship and research. Museums and galleries have to move with the times, be bold and embrace new opportunities wherever they can.    </p> <p>And collections must be living and breathing collections with displays that are rotated and changed regularly, perhaps with curators even involving members of the public on what exhibits might be seen. </p> <p>And there is no reason why institutions cannot be inventive in enabling their collection to be seen by more people in the community, whilst also generating income. Museums charging corporate institutions for the loan of works of art for example? </p> <p>I know that one of the arguments for de-accessiong are those reports, including very recently, that too many treasures are in storage and not made available for more to see.  </p> <p>I can understand there is concern that institutions receiving public financing must do everything in their power to display as much in their collection as possible. The Museums Association has said that it wants to challenge venues to offer more to the public, and I support that view.  </p> <p>But we must also understand that there are those objects which are so fragile that they can only be on public display, if at all, very rarely. There are also those objects that frankly were never intended for public display, such as specific archaeological fragments for example.  Museums have after all a duty to preserve precious items for future generations, as well as making as much of the collection as possible available for all to see.  And we should also not forget that such items are usually available to view by appointment under the right conditions. </p> <p>I don’t for a minute believe that all of you will be content with this [my] approach. My first consideration as the Culture Minister has to be to weigh up what is in the public interest.  I do not believe that the issue of de-accessioning has stagnated, but that much work has been done to take this issue forward, and it is right that it continues to be discussed. But ultimately we need to be very clear that the call for de-accessioning should be one guided by public and not private interest.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8139.aspx Edward Vaizey Farrer and Co seminar on art and heritage uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 18/05/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport National Gallery, London
<p>Tuesday 29 March 2011<br>CBI Forum, London</p> <p>Today more than 40 million of us in the UK regularly use the internet, with 13 million of us able to get online anywhere, anytime through our smartphones. Thirty million of us are on Facebook alone. Internet dating sites are now part of the basket of consumer goods used to calculate the rate of inflation.  </p> <p>The result is an internet that now holds at least 5 billion gigabytes of data.  That’s more than 100 times the size of every bit of text ever written, in every language, since the beginning of recorded history.  </p> <p>Last year, more than 13 million hours of video were uploaded on to YouTube alone. That’s about 150,000 full-length films every week. Or 35 hours of video uploaded every minute. </p> <p>These are tremendous, awe-inspiring figures.<br> <br>So it’s no wonder that many people have already suggested that that the internet has changed the way we think.  </p> <p>Certainly it is changing our social norms – as the rise of internet dating illustrates. </p> <p>And it is also changing our purchasing habits.  According to a report from the Boston Consulting Group, we are now the world leaders in e-commerce with an internet economy worth £100 billion a year.  That means more and more of us purchasing goods online, and more and more people uploading their credit card details to make purchases.</p> <p>In the age of Web 3.0, the lines between our real live selves and our online selves are becoming blurred, as geo-location applications and “always on” networks mean that we are engaged by the internet wherever we are, and the internet always knows where we are.</p> <p>We also live in the world of the cloud, of increased virtualisation, shared sites and shared tenancy. Or put simply of more software and less kit. This in itself asks new and challenging questions of consumers, business and legislators, as well as offering unparalleled opportunities for the transfer and storage of massive quantities of data; data that can be used to improve the world in which we live and the services we use. </p> <p>In a world like this, it is absolutely natural that people are concerned about privacy, but still want to benefit from the services that could effectively compromise it.  </p> <p>This inherent conflict between individual privacy and the latest online applications is something that we see played out in the media virtually every week. </p> <p>Thing about the wall-to-wall coverage of Facebook’s plans to make the phone numbers and addresses of its users available to advertisers.  </p> <p>Or last year when – quite rightly – there was uproar when it was discovered that Google Streetview cars had downloaded people’s passwords and other data. Indeed the French regulator fined Google only last week as a result. </p> <p>Or back in 2009, there was concern when it was discovered a company was working with BT to track behaviour on the internet in order to target advertising more effectively.  </p> <p>In an interconnected world people still value their privacy. Our research shows that three-quarters of people worry about internet security. What is perhaps more surprising is how few of us know how to make ourselves more secure online. </p> <p>Fewer than a third of people have ever changed the security setting of their browser. More than a third did not know how many, if any, cookies they had accepted on to their machine and if so what those cookies do.  Only about one in 10 people actually know what a cookie – in the context of the internet – is.  </p> <p>It seems to me that consumers have two key concerns around privacy. The first is about what happens to the data that we upload: the bank details we submit when we buy our groceries online; the family video on myspace; the photo on Facebook. The second concern is more complicated and relates to what others know about us and where we have been, to the fear of the online big-brother; a debate which in the US has come to be known as “do not track”.</p> <p>Let’s be clear about where we are today. Many people voluntarily give up their privacy when they go online.  But they still want a number of rules to apply.  </p> <p>They want the sites they use to be secure; they want to be sure that their data is kept securely; and they want internet companies to be transparent in how their data is used in terms of tracking their activity on the web.  </p> <p></p> <p>When Government steps into the fast moving world of technology we risk creating more problems than we can solve.   If industry can bring in its own measures to reassure customers – such as clear guidelines in plain English and greater transparency – not only will they win customers, they will avoid regulation.</p> <p>Even so, this is not a completely self-regulated world.  There are already two major pieces of legislation that cover privacy on the internet.  </p> <p>The first is the Data Protection Act which covers how all companies, whether internet based or not, use data.  The Information Commissioner, who enforces the Act, has developed a code of practice specifically to help business to handle personal data online.  That covers everything from the collection of people’s details through application forms to the use of cookies or IP addresses to target content; from using personal data to market goods to the issues around personal data and cloud computing. </p> <p>The second is the e-Privacy Directive. And with a revised version set to come into force in two months’ time, there are three key changes to be aware of: </p> <p>First, personal data breaches, such as your bank losing your banking details or making them available to someone else, will now have to be notified to the Information Commissioner; </p> <p>Second, there will be criminal as well as civil penalties for breaches of the directive; and </p> <p>Third, consumers will now have to give their consent for the import of cookies on to their machines.</p> <p>Of these, it is the cookies provision that is the biggest change, and therefore of most concern to business.  It’s a good example of a well-meaning regulation that will be very difficult to make work in practice.  If we get the implementation wrong, it will seriously hamper the smooth running of the internet, and so it’s therefore a provision that should concern the consumer as well.  </p> <p>That’s why our approach to this very challenging provision is a sensible and pragmatic one.  We have made it clear, for example, that the consent of the user is not needed where a cookie is essential for a service that has been requested by the user. The use of cookies for shopping baskets on websites, for example.  </p> <p>We are also supporting cross-industry work on the use of third party cookies in behavioural advertising. </p> <p>And this is an example of where industry-led solutions can provide an answer.  Yahoo, for instance, recently launched its “ad choices” icon in the UK, after launching it last year in the US. This approach gives the consumer more information on the use of cookies, as well as introducing a self-regulatory compliance and enforcement mechanism. Through clicking on the icon the consumer will be informed about: each specific internet advert; who the advertiser is; the server; who the advert was customised by; and an option to refuse those and other cookies. The icon is exactly the sort of industry developed solution that we see as critical to the UK’s ability to meet the requirements of the Directive.</p> <p>We are also working with the browser manufacturers to see if browsers can be enhanced to provide relevant information about cookies, as well as easy to use settings. Because we want users to be able to make informed decisions about what they do or don’t allow on to their machines.<br> <br>However, a one size fits all solution will not cover everything. There will, inevitably, be legitimate uses of cookies that fall through the cracks. </p> <p>That’s why it is so important for us to adopt a flexible approach – so that new business models and innovations that no one has yet thought of are not held back.  </p> <p>We don’t want to be prescriptive. We want business, regulators and consumers to continue to work together to provide solutions as problems arise.  And we want to see sensible solutions that balance privacy and innovation. </p> <p>At the same time, where there are instances of clear breaches of privacy, it is vital that the Information Commissioner’s Office has the right tools to do its job properly. </p> <p></p> <p>But as well as offering an overview – and underlining the Government’s keeness to pursue self-regulation wherever possible – I also wanted to stress the importance of working both with our European partners, and with the US administration, where online privacy is also a key concern.</p> <p>With TV, radio and publishing, Governments can to an extent set their own rules. These are mediums that respect national boundaries. The internet does not. When we place information on the Internet, we are sharing it with the world.  The rules governing on-line privacy need to reflect that.  For the sake of web users and businesses we need a unified and consistent approach to on-line privacy that crosses borders. </p> <p>In the US the Department of Commerce has just finished consulting for a Green Paper on online privacy, and the Obama Administration has now set out its support for the key principles that will underpin a forthcoming Bill.  </p> <p>This would bring forward a legally enforceable “consumer privacy bill of rights” – broad and flexible enough to allow consumer privacy protection and business practices to adapt to new technologies and services as they emerge.  </p> <p>Crucially, the US is keen to promote consistency on privacy rules. This would cut the multiple compliance burdens that companies face and provide consumers with more consistent cross-border data protections.</p> <p>This “consumer bill of rights” is, it seems to me, not that different from the rights conferred on consumers by Europe’s current data protection and e-Privacy directives.  </p> <p>But, after more than a decade, the European Commission is now quite rightly looking at revisions to the Data Protection Directive. I believe that it is therefore vital that the Commission works closely with the US Administration, so that we can move towards a unified approach that will benefit consumers and businesses alike on both sides of the Atlantic.  </p> <p>Commissioner Reding has already set out the four principles of her approach.  </p> <p>They include, in her words, “the right to be forgotten”; the need for transparency; default privacy settings; and protection from EU data protection rules regardless of whether or not your data is actually processed in the EU.</p> <p>Obviously we will have to look at these proposals in detail.</p> <p>In principle, we support the idea that consumers should have the right to withdraw their consent for data processing. And of course we support greater transparency.  </p> <p>But we also need to be clear about the practicalities of any regulation. For example, how do we enforce the ‘right to be forgotten’ when data can be copied and transferred across the globe in an instant? How do we force a website hosted in Calcutta to take down an image uploaded in Croydon?   We should not give people false expectations.  No Government can guarantee that photos shared with the world will be deleted by everyone when someone decides it’s time to forget. </p> <p>We agree data should be processed in accordance with expectations of privacy in Europe. But we need to be aware that questions of liability could jeopardise the ability of European firms to use the Cloud for data processing and storage. We should question the logic of trying to make firms outside of the EU subject to EU law.</p> <p>When it comes to putting these revisions into practice, we need to think carefully about how to ensure that they do not stifle innovation. We need to ensure that the international transfer of data, so critical to economic growth, can continue. And we need to ensure that changes are both practical and proportionate.</p> <p>This approach informs our efforts at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), where we want to broker an international agreement on the principles of Internet policy-making.</p> <p>Creating an international standard for on-line privacy will ensure businesses compete on a level playing field while web users enjoy the same protections wherever a website is based.  This may seem like a lofty ambition. But I think that looking at trends in the US and intentions in Europe, it is clear that the two are not poles apart.  Indeed, both the Commission and the American Administration recognise that this is a problem that needs to be addressed.</p> <p>We all want to have better control of our data. We all want to see business thrive and innovate. The trick is ensuring that we strike the right balance. </p> <p></p> <p>And it is clear that these are based on a number of principles: transparency; the right to opt in or out of having your data tracked or passed to third parties; proper rules surrounding the storing and transfer of data; the right to have your data removed from specific websites; and an appropriate system of sanction when rules are clearly breached.</p> <p>I look forward to working with the Commission, with other Member States and with the US to see whether a common set of principles can emerge which will support both the interests of consumers and the businesses on which our economy relies. </p> <p>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7997.aspx Edward Vaizey CBI forum on e-privacy and the digital economy uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 29/03/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport CBI Forum, London
<p>Thursday 10 February 2011<br>State of the Arts conference, London</p> <p>Good morning.</p> <p>The State of the Arts conference has, in one year, established itself as the most important occasion in the calendar for the discussion of cultural policy. So today is a great opportunity for me to set out where we are now and what Government sees as the challenges ahead.</p> <p>I want to take the opportunity today to make the case for the importance of the creative ecology – an alliance between the subsidised and commercial arts; the professional and the voluntary arts; and the arts and the creative industries.</p> <p>I want to argue that arts policy should take this creative ecology into account, in order to see the bigger picture and the wider opportunities. We are a hugely creative nation. We have tough times to face, and we will get through them if we face them together.</p> <p>But the great strength of the arts is its ecology – subsidised arts feeding the commercial arts, the voluntary arts and the amateur arts ensuring the creative spirit is present in every corner of the nation. </p> <p>And what creative spirit it is. Whether it’s Rory Kinnear’s Hamlet, Akram Khan’s Gnosis or the Halle’s Mahler season. Or whether it’s Newcastle’s new City Library, Burberry’s collection last year or James Dyson’s beautiful bladeless fan that’s sitting in my office.</p> <p>We should never forget the UK is still revered around the world for its culture and its creativity. Tough times can make us think the glass is half empty. My view is that our cup is still plentiful. <br><br><strong></strong></p> <p>Nevertheless, much of the debate about the arts focuses solely on the level of grant funding, so let me begin by talking about money. </p> <p>It’s worth reminding people – and some still seem oblivious to this fact – that last year’s settlement took place against the background of the largest budget deficit in peacetime history.  </p> <p>The economic situation means that we are borrowing £120 million a day; this is more than the British Museum, the Tate and the National Gallery receive in a year; one pound in every four that we spend is borrowed; only Spain and Ireland have deficits greater than ours.</p> <p>We never pretended that we could maintain arts funding at current levels.  No one who was being honest about the state of the public finances could possibly have argued that.  And anyone who pretends that it would have been possible is being at best disingenuous.</p> <p>So although I am under no illusions that these next few years are going to be tough, I believe we have done all we can to help.</p> <p>Funding across the arts will be more than £1billion in 2011/12. That’s still a hugely significant sum.  It’s broadly in line with the sums of money that have been received over the last fifteen years, since the creation of the Lottery.</p> <p>It’s interesting to see that combined Lottery and grant-in-aid funding for the Arts Council has only beaten 1997 levels in two subsequent years – and in each of those years by less than one per cent. So let’s not pretend that we are moving from feast to famine. </p> <p>We have also ensured that we have simplified the landscape. So we have moved responsibilities from the MLA to the Arts Council, to create a single home for the arts, regional museums and libraries, giving the Arts Council a much stronger voice to make the case for culture at a local and regional level. We have created a single home for British film in the British Film Institute. And we are also establishing Creative England to support the creative industries throughout the country.</p> <p>But at the same time we recognise the challenge faced in other parts of the public sector. I know that one of the biggest worries at the moment is local authority funding. The Government is passionately committed to devolving power to the local level, to locally elected officials and to communities.</p> <p>On the whole, local government knows the needs of local people far better than a central government department ever can. And while I might not agree with every decision made by every local authority, I absolutely respect their right to make that decision themselves.</p> <p>The last thing the arts need is a Whitehall Minister demanding changes to every decision in a local authority that he or she doesn’t agree with. I know a lot of local councillors and that would be hugely counter-productive. </p> <p>The challenge for the arts is to work with their local authorities.</p> <p>Persuade a Council leader that the local library or the local theatre or the local arts centre is a fundamental part, not just of the arts in their area, but their entire community, and that it can deliver more than just an arts service, it can deliver health, education, social services and act as a hub for the community, and you’re three-quarters of the way there.</p> <p>The good local authorities get this already. For all the bad news I also hear good news in places like Newcastle and Gateshead and Reading, working to join all their services up, thinking of the arts as part of a much wider offer to their communities. The challenge we jointly face is how to help the good ones share that expertise with the ones who are still struggling, and help you to win over sceptical chief executives and councillors right across the country. </p> <p>I have often commented about how fortunate we are in this country to have some of the most inspiring arts leaders and performers in the world.  Through our settlement, we have secured funding for our leading arts organisations, free entrance to our national museums, and core funding for our regional museums.</p> <p>So there is an argument for allowing the arts to get on with it on the basis of their four-year settlement. In terms of who gets what, we’ve already done this. We’ve given the Arts Council their allocation and we trust them to make the right decisions on how best to deploy it. And we trust artists to use that money and do what they do best, create great art that has the greatest impact on the widest audience.</p> <p>But there are several key areas where we have decided to intervene, in order to make a long-term difference.</p> <p></p> <p>DCMS and the Arts Council have announced £80 million of new money for a series of match funding schemes over the next five years, beginning in April 2011.</p> <p>It’s important that that matched fund is targeted and used to help those organisations that find it most difficult to fund-raise – those outside London, those that are smaller, those from arts forms that traditionally find it more difficult to attract philanthropy.  We also want to use that fund to kick-start endowments.</p> <p>There are two quick points to make here.  First, this is a long-term strategy.  If you’re talking about endowments, you won’t see the fruit of your work for many years.  And secondly, the emphasis we place on philanthropy is emphatically not with a view to replacing core funding.</p> <p></p> <p>But not only do we need to keep thinking about where the next generation of leaders comes from, and the next after that, but we need to think about the other kinds of opportunities that we need to grasp to continue to flourish.</p> <p>The rapid changes in technology provide just such an opportunity.  It is vital that arts organisations take advantage of new technology, as a new way to engage with audiences, and dare I say it, even make money.  </p> <p>Through technology, arts organisations can really begin to understand where their audiences come from, who they are failing to reach, to push out content, to become broadcasters and content providers.<br>Michael Kaiser from the Kennedy Center wrote a piece last week for the Huffington Post about some of the themes I have talked about.  In seven simple points he nails exactly why technology has, and will continue to revolutionise the way we go about our lives and what that means for artists and for audiences.</p> <p>As he stated: “...to most arts leaders I meet, new technologies are viewed as a threat. They are perceived as competitors for our audiences' time and attention rather than our biggest allies. Arts organizations have been slow to exploit the power of new technology and cling to older, more expensive techniques that are not as effective.  We are clearly doing something wrong. We must find ways to embrace the new technologies. We need to apply the creativity we bring to our stages and galleries to the use of these new tools. The business world, entertainment industry and sports world are all doing so. If we don't make a committed effort, we will fall hopelessly behind and the arts will lose their place in our society.”</p> <p>I couldn’t agree more.  Far be it for me to accuse the arts world of being conservative, but there are clearly opportunities to be had here.  </p> <p>That’s why I’m delighted that the Arts Council and NESTA are establishing a new joint fund to support all types of innovation right across the creative and cultural sector. </p> <p>The new programme will take the people with the most innovative ideas on leadership, business models, technology, content creation, fundraising and audience development, from right the way across the creative industries, providing seed funding for some of the best and help them share their learning. It will also inform a much wider programme of digital innovation that the Arts Council plan to launch in the spring.<br>The Arts Council has also announced its partnership with the BBC, working with the BBC Academy with its media and digital experience to support the development of the arts sector’s media production skills.</p> <p>The partnerships with NESTA and the BBC show where the Arts Council, through a network of new partnerships, can add even greater value for the sector. I want the Arts Council to be an organisation that is a source of advice and expertise for everyone who works or participates in the arts - not just for the organisations it funds, but right the way across the creative ecology.</p> <p>I want the Arts Council to work with other organisations as well – why not the Technology Strategy Board, the BFI and Creative England? I also want to see them learn from the huge number of other creative organisations who need no encouragement in developing innovative partnerships across the creative industries, but also to help those who lack the resources, the knowledge or the guidance to do the same and who are trapped in what often still looks like a landscape of individual silos.</p> <p>The work the Arts Council is doing with the BBC, with NESTA and with others is designed to address this, and marks the start of a new focus from government on innovation in the arts. </p> <p>As well as developing new technologies and our capacity to innovate, we also need to develop the audiences of the future.</p> <p>Earlier this week Darren Henley published his review of music education.  I’m delighted that as a result we have secured funding for music education in schools, with £82.5m committed next year.  He made a number of key recommendations which will strengthen music education for the future and we will be setting out our full response to these in a National Plan for Music Education later in the year.</p> <p>I think the strength of the policy that the Plan will address is that it  is more than just about the money. It is the desire to bring rigour and accountability to public investment– a determination to join up random initiatives to create a coherent whole, and not to accept second best.</p> <p>So it should be with cultural education.  We have therefore asked Darren to carry out a second review to look at the best way of ensuring that our children have access to a solid cultural education, bringing together the wide range of opportunities available in the arts, heritage, film and museums.<br>I hope that you will all engage in the debate about how best to support cultural education and support him in this important work.</p> <p></p> <p>We aim to do this</p> <p>I think the next few years provide huge opportunities for the arts, and Government’s role is to support you in taking advantage of them. I’m looking forward to a discussion about how best we can do that.</p> <p>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7834.aspx Edward Vaizey ‘The Creative Ecology’ – Speech at State of the Arts uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 10/02/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport State of the Arts conference, London
<p>Thursday 27 January 2011<br>Capital Matters launch, London</p> <p>Good morning. </p> <p>I want to thank Mission, Models, Money and the Cultural Leadership programme for putting on this conference, and in particular I want to thank Clare Cooper at MMM, and David Kershaw and Hilary Carty at CLP for all their hard work. And thanks too to the National Theatre for hosting us. It’s brilliant to be surrounded by organisations that represent the kind of innovative, forward thinking that’s needed at the moment, as we face a challenging period of change.</p> <p>Where are we at the moment?  We’ve secured the core arts budget for the lifetime of this Parliament.  The Arts Council has been asked to protect funding for the organisations it supports, cutting that budget by less than 15 per cent.  Taking into account the increases in the National Lottery, total funding for ACE will reduce by just 11 per cent over four years.  National museums have had their grants reduced by just 15%, and it’s the same with Renaissance in the Regions.  Again, increases in the Heritage Lottery Fund should help, given that a third of its funding goes to museums.  And we have released almost £150 million of national museums’ reserves.</p> <p>The debate is now moving on from core Government funding.  <br>In December we announced our ten point strategy for increasing philanthropy across the country. Greater public recognition, better long term cultivation of donors, more planned giving, harnessing new technologies to boost fundraising, and an announcement of at least £80m for a new match funding scheme over the next few years.<br>While I am looking forward to the debate about how we increase private and corporate giving to the arts - and where better to say that than at the National Theatre, with the spectacular £10m donation they received from Lloyd Dorfman last year - today I want to start another debate.  I want to talk about how the arts can take advantage of the technological revolution that is happening all around us.  </p> <p>We live today in an age of technology and change that brings huge opportunities to the arts – to engage with new audiences, to interpret objects in ways that tell stories more vividly, to create and distribute work in different ways and to come up with new models of distribution and engagement.</p> <p>I have a unique position.  I am not only the arts minister, but also the minister for the internet, for mobile phones, and even partly technology.  So I talk to tech entrepreneurs a lot about how they see technology and the internet developing. <br><br>We are moving to an age where we will always be connected to the internet, and where the smart phone will become someone’s digital identity.  It means that you can reach out and grab them as they walk by, or if they are half-way across the world.  It means that you can engage with them in the auditorium or gallery, or at home, or at work or on holiday.  The possibilities are endless.</p> <p>People will ask technology to help them make choices.  Crowd sourcing means that technology will make recommendations to you, based on what people like you have already done.  That means when people ask “What shall I do today?”, technology will recommend the latest exhibition or performance.<br>GPS technology means that technology will tell them what is good to go and see near where they are.  And of course technology means that people will visit you even when they are far away. </p> <p>Technology actually helps change the kind of performance organisations put on, whether it’s the RSC’s ‘Such Tweet Sorrow’ or The Royal Opera House’s Twitter Opera. Both got thousands of followers on Twitter and drove even more to their website on the back of huge press coverage. My instinct is that many of these were new audiences.</p> <p>Or take, for example, the brilliant Streetmuseum app from the Museum of London. Hold up your iPhone in hundreds of different places in London, and historical photos and information are overlaid onto a live image taken from the iPhone’s camera. It’s fascinating stuff, but certainly not limited just to that museum. The Tate has been doing innovative work in this area, and several museums have been experimenting with new ways to interpret, inform and entertain.</p> <p>I think there are huge opportunities to do more in this space, working with commercial partners.  A start-up company called Artfinder is putting collections on line, allowing users to download an app for the iPad and similar tablets that enables them to curate their own tour before visiting, to order prints of paintings they like, and to find where else they can see similar paintings. </p> <p>It could be used even more imaginatively, allowing galleries to open up their storerooms and engaging local people in curating their own shows. I know that Roy Clare at the MLA has been working with Artfinder to extend its circle of early-adopter museums and expand the horizons of its applications. </p> <p>Tourists will find benefits in an app that exposes local artists, great places of culture and entertainment, all linked to maps and guides for people on the move. Imagine travelling to the Dedham Vale in Suffolk – Constable country – and locating the mill, seeing his paintings hanging in Ipswich, find out where else Constable collections are held, make your own notes around your favourites, book lunch and play a round of golf before spending the evening in the Mercury Theatre in Colchester. All planned and curated on an app or two.</p> <p>Or imagine walking into a national museum, holding your camera up to a Holbein and getting the text from the guidebook up on your phone, with a link to a documentary on YouTube and an audio book on iTunes.</p> <p>How about at the opera? Turn on your app and get live surtitles in a language of your choice or the biography of the soprano.</p> <p>Or at the theatre, hold your phone up to the upcoming productions and see the trailers, then tap a link and download the play itself to watch when you’re back at home.</p> <p>There’s a company based in Soho called Digital Theatre, that some of you already work with and many more of you should look into, that’s doing something like this already.</p> <p>They use their own equipment to record theatre productions, then sell them for far less than the cost of a ticket to watch online, but from the best spot possible. You can even watch their trailers on their iPhone app. And there’s no reason this can’t been done for dance, opera, ballet, pretty much any performing art.</p> <p>The technology is there, and the money made from selling access to the videos is shared, so it’s a potential new source of income as well.</p> <p>Or the Theatre Ninjas, a bunch of young people I met a couple of weeks ago who have devised an app that alerts people when a theatre makes free tickets available.  They trialled it in Edinburgh – it ensured full attendances, but it also drove sales – people who went to the theatre and missed out on a free ticket ended up buying a ticket for the performance just because they were there.</p> <p>Likewise, we’ve seen the success of NT Live here at the National Theatre, starting with Phèdre, and it’s catching on, the Royal Opera House is recording its productions and broadcasting them live in cinemas. The ENO is doing it in 3D.</p> <p>And there’s a variety of interesting tools available to help organisations understand the dynamics and motivations of digitally engaged audiences. </p> <p>From the very basic, and free, things like Google Analytics, to bespoke solutions like MusicMetric, a product made by a little company based in Shoreditch which gives people marketing music new insights into the online behaviour of their customers, where they find new music, how they share it and who they share it with.</p> <p>The arts are often called an ecology because they grow together and build partnerships to solve problems. For example, the Royal Opera House led a ‘Culture Hack’ weekend a fortnight ago, where they got some of the UK’s brightest software developers to give their time for free to explore, repurpose and create new digital products for the whole cultural sector, not for their benefit, but for everyone’s. Or the Culture Label website, bringing together hundreds of museums, galleries and artists to sell their products in a single space. </p> <p>So there are dozens, hundreds of organisations that are fantastic at doing this, at harnessing the power of technology to benefit their organisations. They are absolutely at the cutting edge, artistically, culturally and technologically. But equally, there are some relying on a 20th century formula which worked well in the past, may work well now, but probably won’t in a decade’s time. And there are some that simply don’t have the resources to engage in this way.</p> <p>So there’s a need to help those that want to explore a different business model, or take advantage of a new technology but, for whatever reason, can’t. And there’s also a need to demonstrate the potential benefits to those who don’t see this as a priority at all.</p> <p>There’s plenty of people already there to help in specific areas, like MMM with their work on the business side and CLP’s brilliant work nurturing leadership skills, for example.  NESTA and the Technology Strategy Board are doing some fantastic work with new technology, but we don’t always think those organisations might have a role to play in helping the arts.<br>A number of trusts and foundations like Clore Duffield support leadership and innovation, as do the Sector Skills Councils and the Renaissance programme for regional museums.</p> <p>But the problem I see is an absence of something to join them all up, to coordinate what they do and to drive their agenda forward. That’s a role I want to see the Arts Council undertake, starting today.</p> <p>They’ve already said in their ten year strategy that one of their key priorities is to build a sustainable, resilient and innovative cultural sector. I want to see them offering a service right the way across the subsidised and commercial arts sector - and beyond with their new responsibilities for museums and libraries.  A service that helps organisations find out about and implement the kind of innovations that will be needed over the next few years.</p> <p>They will only be able to do this by working seamlessly with the rest of the Creative Industries, taking advantage of the knowledge and experience in the video games or design sectors, and sharing that with arts organisations - and vice versa. We’re already seeing the start of this with the partnership they’ve signed with the BBC and I’m pleased that the Arts Council has appointed Thomas Fleming as their Creative Industries adviser. </p> <p>Today I can also announce that the Arts Council and NESTA will work together on a new programme that will support this agenda, hopefully providing up to a million pounds of seed funding for small projects that will share their learning across these sectors.</p> <p>This, along with the Arts Council’s Digital Innovation fund which they’ll be launching in the Spring will build on the work that’s already there, but also catalyse new thinking and learning, and help bring it all together into something that drives and inspires technology and innovation across the whole spectrum of creativity.</p> <p>I envisage these programmes working together to do a number of things:</p> <p>That last point is the most important for me. We’ve got something like 50,000 cultural organisations in this country and they’ve got plenty in common. They all spend money, they are all driven by an interest and a passion for an art form and they all have an audience, whether it’s a few people in a village hall in Cumbria or 5 million people each year at the British Museum.</p> <p>There’s two ways these 50,000 organisations can find practical solutions to the various challenges they’re facing. They can invent something entirely new, all by themselves, if they have the money.  Or they can use what’s already there. We should be sharing and using what we know already works, pooling knowledge and resources.</p> <p>I’ve another motive for wanting to keep up the pace of innovation and development in the creative industries. Of course, the most important reason for doing this is to better serve our audiences, to broaden and deepen experiences of the arts and help them reach more people and have a greater impact on them. </p> <p>But I also want our cultural organisations to be seen as part of our creative industries.  When we talk about the creative industries I don’t just want to talk about video games, or advertising, or fashion. I want to talk about museums and the performing arts. Arts organisations are a fundamental part of the creative industries, and of our future growth. Driving technological change, educating and training new creative talent or developing the content that we’re known for around the world.</p> <p>But to play our part we need to be better at talking in terms of growth, jobs and revenue as well as art, audiences, engagement. I’m aware this is a concept that doesn’t always sit well with some, but it should, and it needs to.</p> <p>For too long we’ve been uncomfortable with the subsidised arts, with its focus on the public good it creates, having a commercial focus too. I’m not advocating a shift away from great art and towards great economics, but we should recognise that the two are complementary.</p> <p>Growth in the cultural and creative industries will directly benefit them. More money generated means more money to invest - in great art. At the moment large parts of the arts are hard-wired to resist this, but it’s something that has to change.</p> <p>The Capital Matters report gets the ball rolling on this, it’s going to help change the debates we have and how we have them, but there needs to be the support there for artists and arts organisations who don’t have the experience or confidence to make these changes themselves.<br><br>I see the challenges we face today as an opportunity to do things differently. Our cultural and creative industries are already fantastic, but I believe that they can be even better. But they will only become better by sharing ideas with, and learning from other sectors, by not being ashamed to talk about jobs and growth, by joining forces as a coherent sector of the economy and working together with an unwavering commitment to providing ever more remarkable experiences for the public.</p> <p>My number one focus for however long I’m lucky enough to be Arts Minister will be enabling this, and I look forward to working with you all to do it.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7744.aspx Edward Vaizey Speech on cultural innovation at the National Theatre uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 27/01/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport Capital Matters launch, London
<p>Tuesday 11 January 2011<br>International Festival of Learning and Technology, London</p> <p>I am delighted to be here at the Learning without Frontiers international festival of learning and technology.</p> <p>I wanted to begin by congratulating Graham Brown-Martin on organising this year’s conference, as he has done for several years now.  Graham has described this as a conference for disruptive thinkers.  I am not sure I deserve that accolade, but even if I am not one, I certainly admire people who are.  Graham is one of them, as are many of the people who will speak at this conference.</p> <p>I think the hallmark of a disruptive thinker is someone who recognises change, and somebody who can embrace change.  That’s what makes them exciting people to discuss issues with and learn from.  And we do live in an age of disruptive technology, we should employ the same principle.  To recognise its disruption and to embrace the change it brings.</p> <p>Our kids certainly do.  The term “digital native” has been coined to describe those, now in their late teens, who have grown up around the technology changes that still appear new and exciting to people my age.  And each generation becomes more and more native, the rise of the smart phone, the tablet, the permanent internet are still relatively new phenomenons.  Each generation knows more than the last, is embracing newer technology than the previous generation.</p> <p>I was struck by an article in The Guardian by Charles Arthur last year, where he made the point that most kids are further ahead of their teachers in terms of understanding technology.  A lot of them have smart phones, but a lot just explore on computers at school, home and at the library.  It’s a modern version of asking your kids to programme the video, which was as far as I got in terms of being technologically ahead of my parents.</p> <p>That’s why I asked people like Charles Arthur, as well as David Yarnton and Ray Maguire, who are also speaking today, to come to a round table I held in the Department for Business, Innovation &amp; Skills at the end of last year.  I want to explore ways in which we can harness the power of some of the biggest games companies – Sony. Nintendo, Microsoft, but also home grown companies and small firms – to help engage kids with technology.<br><br>The e-skills computer clubs initiative, Computer Clubs 4 Girls, has, for example,  been hugely successful in transforming the way 10 to 14 year old girls think about technology.  It’s an online resource that provides fun and educational IT activities, helping to spark young people’s interest in technology.<br><br>Derek Robertson and Dawn Hallybone are speaking later; both of whom have successfully introduced the Nintendo DS to the classroom, resulting in students becoming more confident in using technology. <br><br>This is all great.  But I just think there is more that we can be doing.<br><br>The opportunity is enormous and the potential is even greater. There are at least 13m games consoles in the home offering potential learning platforms.  What is more, these are increasingly connected which means there is opportunity for a really collaborative approach to learning and knowledge sharing. When we include handheld devices that opportunity and potential becomes compelling.<br><br>So we know we can deliver great clubs and by getting children to collaborate with each other we can also get mass. I was inspired by what I heard at the roundtable and I am keen to see what we can get off the ground.<br><br>We should recognise that the education system is our best asset. <br><br>And the ages of 11-14 are important in terms of eventual careers. Although kids do not decide on the career they wish to pursue, they do tend to rule some careers out at this point.<br><br>The Department for Education has launched a 3 year campaign aimed at informing students, parents and others of the career options that STEM subjects can lead to.<br>But we also need to hold on the idea of getting kids exposed to businesses and industry professionals which is why I am calling on the Games industry to continue the excellent work already in evidence in engaging directly with both the teachers and the students.<br><br>For example, I was excited to hear about the work which Young Rewired State has done with young people around hackdays and challenges which have brought young developers, entrepreneurs and the open data community together. At the last event in the summer a team of 15 year olds came up with the concept of the “Social Library”, a way of using online technology to embed our libraries in the online worlds we now inhabit. I am pleased to announce that I have asked the new Government Skunkworks to work with these young people and the wider community to develop the concept as part of our commitment to the Big Society. </p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>I’m lucky enough to have RM in my constituency, and I enjoy going every so often to their classroom of the future.  I’m not depressed that there’s no blackboard or chalk.  <br><br>I’m excited by the interactive whiteboards, the table top computers, and the engineering models that are available in schools today.</p> <p>I’m excited by the kind of technology that allows a quadriplegic to type and participate in classroom.  </p> <p>The scope that digital technologies offer to support learning is also an important theme in our work on e-accessibility.  </p> <p>I was delighted to launch the e-accessibility action plan last October and I am proud that the UK is at the forefront of working to deliver accessibility across a wide range of platforms.  <br><br>Digital inclusion has support from the highest levels of government. Jeremy Hunt and myself, and Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox, have all expressed our strong support of the e-accessibility Forum and its work.<br><br>Digital technologies have great scope to impact on previously excluded people’s opportunities to learn, to play, to socially interact.<br><br>The Forum is looking, for example, at how innovations in the video games industry can be used to help disabled and older people take part in education and other walks of life.  <br><br>A great example of this is the inspirational work of the charity SpecialEffect including its Stargaze pilot project. <br><br>This ground-breaking project offers eye-controlled technology enabling people who have suffered paralysis to operate a computer for communication, independence, work and leisure.</p> <p></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7702.aspx Edward Vaizey Speech to the Learning Without Frontiers forum uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 11/01/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport International Festival of Learning and Technology, London
<p>Monday 29 November 2010<br>BAFTA, London</p> <p><strong>CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY<br></strong><br>Today I want to set out our plans to build on the success of the British film industry.</p> <p>The industry has enjoyed significant successes in recent years.  UK box office takings reached a record-breaking £944 million last year, and will almost certainly break the £1 billion barrier this year.  UK films grossed $2 billion at the box office worldwide.</p> <p>The BFI’s 54th London Film Festival earlier in the year showcased some of the very best the UK has to offer, from Danny Boyle’s 127 hours to Tom Hooper’s The King’s Speech.</p> <p>This year also saw Stephen Frears’ Tamara Drewe and Nigel Cole’s Made in Dagenham, both great critical successes.  Harry Potter 7 has just put in a record opening weekend performance of 18.3m at the box office. This is a record for any British film, and indeed any film ever, in the UK market;<br> <br>Pirates of the Caribbean 4 is being filmed here in the UK - when the first three were not – another sign that the industry is doing extraordinary well. </p> <p>And I was delighted when WarnerBros announced earlier this month their decision to make a £100 million investment in Leavesden.  That is a fantastic vote of confidence, and the first Hollywood studio to be built outside Hollywood in a century.</p> <p>But despite this success, we cannot be complacent.  The goal of a sustainable, independent British film industry remains as elusive as ever.  We need to try and find <br>ways of leveraging the wealth of creative talent in this country, the technical expertise, the great writers and actors who emerge generation after generation, the proliferation of fertile, gifted entrepreneurs. </p> <p>I recognise change is always difficult and I know the last few months have created uncertainty as we have engaged widely with stakeholders on how best to move forward.  But I believe the proposals I am setting out today will help us to begin to address some of the endemic problems within the industry.</p> <p></p> <p>The BFI has a long history as a cultural institution protecting our film heritage. It has an internationally recognised brand. It runs the fantastic London Film Festival which gathers the best of the British film industry as well as a vast range of commercial organisations. It has successfully led the UK-wide film heritage programme, involving all the stakeholders in all the Nations and Regions.  It has the breadth and depth to support excellence and high quality film, while also developing audiences for British films, through its distribution and exhibition arm, which already services more than 600 venues, from remote screenings in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland to the Imax in London.</p> <p></p> <p><br>I want to make it crystal clear today that we intend to maintain the film tax credit, which is worth over £100million each year to British Film.  We have already begun to work on the re-notification process to European Commission, as we are technically required to do.  We will also make sure that the views of those accessing the credit and completing the cultural test are taken into consideration as we re-notify the scheme. </p> <p></p> <p>They will now re-configure themselves as a single national body, Creative England, chaired by John Newbigin, with three hubs in the north, Midlands and south.  These will continue to support new talent and new businesses wherever they are located, building on their intimate knowledge of the cities and regions in which they have been based. They will engage with the industry to ensure that the views of the sector are properly taken into account. </p> <p>The BFI will establish strategic partnerships with Creative England, Film London which will remain outside the Creative England structure, and with the film agencies in the Nations – Creative Scotland, the Film agency for Wales, Northern Ireland Screen - to ensure that public funding – Lottery and where relevant grant-in-aid - continues to support film in the Nations and the regions.</p> <p>And because over the last ten years the RSAs have grown their client base from film and TV to a wider spread of creative businesses, including interactive games and music, and because each of them has begun to develop their own particular specialisms and expertise, this new structure offers the possibility of more focused support for a wider range of businesses;- helping small companies grow, helping new talent establish itself and mobilising public and private investment to grow England’s creative industries. </p> <p></p> <p>I also strongly believe Sky should seriously consider investing in the production of British Film.  As one of the country’s most innovative broadcasters, it would bring a new dynamic force to the table, which would lift everyone’s game.</p> <p><br><strong></strong></p> <p>I want to continue to encourage other parts of the private sector to support British film as much as they can.  I am therefore delighted that Odeon is announcing today a series of proposals to support the industry. They will reward Odeon Premiere Card holders with additional points every time they go to see a British Film; use their website to promote British films; and become a regular source of online information for British Film fans, including ODEON’s recommended “British Film Of The Month”. They will also consider giving guaranteed on-screen support to a British Film Of The Month, with a view to showing a wider choice of British films as a result. </p> <p><br><strong></strong></p> <p>In converting to digital technology, the cinema sector is experiencing its most significant change in perhaps 80 years. While this offers huge opportunities, we know it also represents a significant financial challenge to a large number of small independently-run cinemas across the country. That is why I am delighted that - with the support of the major cinema operators and studios – the industry is seeking its own solution through the UK Digital Funding Partnership.  Recognising the social, cultural and economic value that many of these sites provide for their local communities, the Government very much supports the work of the Partnership in seeking to ensure that no cinema is left behind during this momentous change.</p> <p><a href="#top"><br></a><strong></strong></p> <p>A new BFI, increased funding from the Lottery, the establishment of Creative England, an increased commitment from Film 4 and the BBC, support from Odeon, a Digital Funding Partnership – these are all good news stories.  But this is the beginning of a process, not the end.</p> <p></p> <p>PACT has come forward with a series of proposals, in particular the “locked box”; the reduction in the length of the licence period to 5 years; and a new ‘use it or lose it’ provision under which rights would revert to the producer if the broadcaster was not using its broadcast rights.</p> <p>I am aware that these proposals present some challenges, but they are an extremely interesting way forward that we need to consider very carefully.  So, in partnership with the BFI, we will take forward a review of how the Lottery distribution and recoupment policy can better contribute to a sustainable industry.  </p> <p>Finally, I want to set out our proposals for inward investment and export promotion.</p> <p>Before I do so, I want to address one issue.   Some people think there are two film industries in this country – the US film industry, and the UK film industry - and that somehow one side’s success is dependent on the other side’s failure.  </p> <p>I do not share that view.  I believe that the two industries are two sides of the same coin.</p> <p>We benefit massively from Hollywood’s investment in this country.  Continued investment in major productions has sustained organisations such as Pinewood, Double Negative and Framestore.  It has provided employment for thousands of people.  It has sustained a huge amount of technical expertise that is as good as any in the world.  It has helped us become one of the leading centres for visual effects.</p> <p>Hollywood investment promotes British characters, British stories and British talents on the world stage and gives our culture, our history, and our values to an international audience. </p> <p>And the people I meet from Hollywood have actually been in this country for decades – people like Josh Berger from Warner Bros, Barbara Broccoli and many more.</p> <p>So I make no apologies for saying that I want to maintain that investment.  We’ve been helped recently by a favourable exchange rate.  But we also have the infrastructure and the talent to continue to attract inward investment.  Last year inward investment from international film makers brought in over £780million to the British economy. That’s the highest total ever. We expect this contribution to be even higher this year. </p> <p>The Office of the British Film Commissioner, and particularly its branch in Los Angeles, has done a fantastic job in convincing US studios to bring their films to the UK, in what has become a very competitive world market. </p> <p>Today I'm pleased to announce that Film London will be responsible for promoting the UK across the world as the best place to invest in film, in a public-private partnership with the industry.</p> <p>I want to be absolutely clear that Film London’s remit will be about promoting the whole of the UK.  Film London will set out the details of their approach very shortly, including how governance arrangements can ensure that Nations and regions’ views are fully represented, and that industry plays its due role in contributing strategically and financially to the promotion of inward investment.</p> <p>Film London will work with UK Screen, the Production Guild, Pinewood Studios and many others to ensure an industry led approach. I think it’s a remarkable example of industry players coming together quickly to take up the challenge we set this summer – in hard times, they have been working together to ensure that the US studios continue to invest in the UK as a world class destination to make films. </p> <p>I also want to mention the other side of the international picture. </p> <p>Creative exports, such as British film and television, make up an important and vibrant part of our economy.  They will continue to be an important source of growth and prosperity in the years ahead.  That is why I am pleased that BAFTA, the BFI, Film London and BBC Worldwide are working together to build on their existing capacities and connections to explore showcasing and promoting British films to the entertainment industry in the US, the world’s largest market for media and entertainment services. This will be a good development for UK film and it is industry led.</p> <p>This work will make use of BBC Worldwide and BAFTA’s reputations, marketing expertise, local presence and local knowledge. BBC Worldwide, for example, already delivers around 10% of the UKs creative exports.  It has a team in LA and will be able to assist British filmmakers in showcasing their work to key distributors in the American market. This complements other industry-led work to support British films in key European and BRIC markets, like the work currently led by PACT and UKTI.</p> <p></p> <p>We will have one lead body for British film – a new BFI - responsible for  heritage, for education and for supporting the production, the distribution and the exhibition of new British films;</p> <p>British film will be supported by a substantial increase in Lottery funding, as well as<br>enhanced support from Film 4 and the BBC; major companies like Odeon are now coming forward with proposals to support the British film industry further;</p> <p>We will maintain the invaluable tax credit and certification unit, to build on the huge overseas and domestic investment that has been stimulated in the industry;</p> <p>We will have a new network to support film in the regions – Creative England – with three major centres in the north, Midlands and the south;</p> <p>We will have a refreshed inward investment offer, led by Film London, in partnership with the industry, and an enhanced industry-led export offer supported by BAFTA and BBC Worldwide; </p> <p>And next year we will maintain our commitment by examining new ideas to help British film companies build sustainable organisations.</p> <p>The BFI, UKFC and Film London will start due diligences immediately and work together to ensure a smooth transition. Early in the New Year they will publish a transfer plan setting out a clear timetable for the various activities to be moved across. All stakeholders – in particular the staff, and all Lottery and certification applicants – will have clarity in advance on when the various transfers will take place. This plan will ensure that there is no gap in the service provided to the film industry.</p> <p>I intend to continue my close working with the industry.  As my final announcement, I am delighted to confirm that I will be establishing a Ministerial Film Forum, which will meet under my chairmanship for the first time in January and thereafter every six months, to take forward in a collaborative fashion issues of key concern to the industry. <br><br><br><br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7602.aspx Edward Vaizey The Future of the UK Film Industry uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 29/11/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport BAFTA, London
<p>Tuesday 12 October 2010<br>London</p> <p>Thank you. I am very pleased to welcome you all today and formally launch the e-Accessibility Action Plan. </p> <p>There are some areas where it is important that Government takes the lead. I was pleased to find when I became Minister that there was a newly-formed e-Accessibility forum. One of the forum’s key objectives was to produce and implement an e - Accessibility Action Plan which addresses the issues of people with particular needs so they can partake fully in the UK digital economy. </p> <p>So today’s launch of the e-Accessibility Action Plan is particularly welcome. </p> <p>I should like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has contributed to the development of the plan and who has agreed to be involved in the delivery of its objectives.</p> <p></p> <p>What does this mean? </p> <p>Firstly, it means that we have work to do on the regulatory framework. As I’m sure you all know, we must implement the revised EU Framework on Electronic Communications Networks and Services in UK law by the 25th May, 2011. The Framework introduces new provisions, particularly in the Universal Service Directive, on equivalence of access and choice for disabled end users. </p> <p>The UK already has a good story to tell on providing access to services for disabled people – and I want to see that we capitalise on that expertise and continue to improve access. </p> <p>Through BT, the UK already provides the text relay service and access to the emergency services that are mandated by the revised Framework. BT is also committed to rolling out SMS access to the emergency services once it has procured the additional equipment that is needed to provide the necessary level of service resilience. </p> <p>The revised Framework builds on and strengthens the provisions on equivalence in the Universal Service Order. These set out the special measures that ensure that all end-users, including those with disabilities and special social needs, have access to certain services irrespective of their geographical location and at an affordable price. </p> <p>Perhaps the most important provision obliges Member States to empower national regulators to specify, where appropriate, measures to ensure that disabled end-users have equivalent access and choice of electronic communication services. </p> <p>Last month we published a consultation document on the implementation of these directives. I hope all of you will respond to the consultation as I wish to capture the collective knowledge and experience that is evident here in this hall. </p> <p>Second, the Forum remit is to support business in exploiting the opportunities that e-Accessibility in the EU and globally offers. </p> <p>Getting the e-Access question right will ensure that the UK is one of the most competitive, highly skilled and technologically advanced economies in the world. And UK businesses will be able to draw on a larger workforce whose skills it would not otherwise have had access to. </p> <p>So, there are opportunities here from designing products for ease of use of the vast majority of people – particularly keeping in mind that as we get older, most of us find our eyesight is not what it was, our fingers become stiffer, and we find it more difficult to absorb new information and ways of handling it. </p> <p>It will also help businesses develop products that consumers value, which cause fewer complaints, and therefore reduces the number of returns or demands that could be made on a company’s customer service department. </p> <p>In that respect I am particularly pleased that the Employers Forum for Disability and BT are today publishing a best practice guide for call centre staff. It is an excellent example of business working together to address the needs of significant numbers of their customers. </p> <p>Many businesses, such as Microsoft, BT, Apple and Google now see the benefit to promoting, delivering and designing with e-Access and inclusiveness in mind. </p> <p>But there will always be people who need assistive technology such as Braille keyboards. Again, with the emphasis now across the EU on equivalence of access, a much larger market is opening up for those manufacturers of what have been previously regarded as niche products. With potentially greater volumes it should be possible for design to improve, and prices to fall, making the equipment more affordable for those most in need or the charities that support them. </p> <p>The voluntary sector has a critical role to play in bringing to the table its expertise, practical experience and knowledge of people’s needs. </p> <p>And thirdly, the e-Accessibility Action Plan, that we are launching today is focused on activities that will ensure that the future development of digital products and services are “designed for all”. </p> <p>In this way the general market will meet the needs of the vast majority of people, and it will also be easier to identify those particular equipment and service requirements necessary for all disabled people to fully participate and engage with today’s digital world. </p> <p>First, it looks at the regulatory framework. </p> <p>Secondly, it considers what consumer technology and digital equipment is on the market and how issues surrounding affordability and availability of assistive technologies can be resolved by ‘designing equipment for all’. And when the purchase of specialist equipment is necessary, how we can mitigate or offset this possible cost barrier to engaging in the digital world. </p> <p>Thirdly, we look at how we can improve on Website Services. I want to see an increase in the accessibility of Government online services. This includes the promotion of developing websites that enable the use of Assistive Technology such as screen readers and uses W.C.A.G. 2.0 (Web Content Accessibilty Guidelines) and double A standards. </p> <p>Fourth, we will continue to work to remove barriers and make content accessible. This will involve looking at the issues that surround the rules and regulations for television subtitles and audio-description. And the Digital Television Group, a member of the forum, is considering what needs to be done to deliver subtitles, audio description and text to speech services for connected television such as YouView. The Forum will also look at how a wider selection of publishing material, such as e-books, can be made more accessible to the visually impaired. </p> <p>Fifth, it will, as I will, continue to promote and raise awareness of the issues e-Accessibility and ensure that we make the necessary progress to achieve an inclusive society. </p> <p>Many of these actions result from the report on barriers for disabled people to using the internet which was produced by the Consumer Expert Group last October. That report showed that people with certain disabilities face very particular issues of accessing products and services. And the report looked mainly at Internet access via computers as well as training and long term support.<br><strong></strong></p> <p><br>So the e-Accessibility action plan is still in its infancy. So far it is only a document. Its aims can only be delivered successfully if people grasp the opportunities that it offers. You have a chance to shape its impact. It will only be effective if it delivers what we all want and reflects the interests and inputs of a wide range of businesses, charitable organisations as well as public sector bodies. <br>There is no end point for this action Plan. With the pace of change in today’s digital society, it is unlikely that we will be able to say “job done”. But we must focus on what we can achieve. I want to see a step change. And I want to see it by the time of the Olympics and Paralympics in 2012.</p> <p></p> <p>I believe it will be the collaboration and partnerships that will occur between business, the voluntary sector and the Government that will make the difference. </p> <p>And this plan will help create this environment of co-operation and deliver results that will drive the e-Accessibility agenda forward.<br><br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7836.aspx Edward Vaizey e-Accessibility Action Plan uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 12/10/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport London
<p>Tuesday 5 October 2010<br>Manchester</p> <p>Museums are doing well.  With around 2500 museums in the country, there are now over 131 designated collections and 1800 Accredited Museums. Over 42 million people visited the DCMS sponsored museums last year, up from 20 million in 1990. </p> <p>While the themes of this year’s conference capture some of the difficult issues that museums are facing, they also show that even in tough times, it is possible to think creatively think about the future.</p> <p>I want to use today’s speech to set out the future policy direction for museums, particularly in the light of our decision to close the MLA, and the on-going debate about the future of Renaissance.  </p> <p>I know, as well, that the major concern for all of you is the forthcoming spending review.  We are all aware of the extraordinary economic challenges that we currently face. There is a real need to reduce government spending and each Department will be expected to play its full part.   <br><br>The DCMS is not immune from this process, and that is absolutely right. We have already announced that DCMS will reduce its own costs by 50%, and we will be pushing hard to see that the bodies we fund deliver their own administration savings. <br> <br>The Secretary of State has made it clear that his objective will be to find as much savings as he can from overheads and administration, passing as much as possible down to the front line where it will have most impact.</p> <p>I cannot predict what the Department’s settlement will be when it is announced on 20th October but, whatever the outcome, Jeremy Hunt and I will do all we can to ensure that the cultural sector retains the capacity to deliver quality services, to innovate, and to grow in the future.</p> <p>But I cannot do this on my own.  Everyone who works in museums will have to play their part in ensuring that their organisations thrive in the future. Our great museum collections are not the creation of Ministers, politicians, civil servants and Spending Reviews, but of private entrepreneurs and enlightened people with the vision and leadership to create great institutions up and down this country. </p> <p>But driving forward will take courage and ingenuity. The state cannot afford to subsidise those who are unable to help themselves. All museums need to develop a stronger instinct for partnership, mergers, commercial ventures and new approaches. Those who fund museums and those who govern and lead them need to consider fresh strategies to ensure stability in the years to come. </p> <p><br>As I have made clear, the need to focus on front-line delivery has been the guiding principle in our review of public bodies.   We have aimed not only to reduce the number of bodies and their overall cost, but also to increase transparency, accountability and value for money.   It is within this context that we have made the difficult decision to abolish the MLA. </p> <p>The MLA has carried out valuable work, publishing best practice’ supporting cultural organisations and working collaboratively with local Councils, among the most important sources of funding for museums. It has funded a range of valuable projects, such as Stories of the World. </p> <p>There has been, and will continue to be, true partnership working, which will ensure as far as possible continuity for the museums sector through this turbulent period – or as Roy might put it, “stormy seas”. <br>While the MLA will be abolished, Government’s clear support for the museums, libraries and archives will continue.  </p> <p>Through the Spending Review we will be looking critically at the functions of the MLA to consider what work  will need to stop. Where work will continue, we will consider how it can be effectively delivered by another organisation. </p> <p>This is not simply about absorbing work, but identifying an organisation that is in a position to engage effectively with museums issues and provide clear leadership and profile for the sector. Where possible, we will look to see how we can ensure that the MLA’s essential expertise and skills are not lost.  </p> <p>While this is a difficult time, it is also an opportunity to rethink how we target funding, and effectively support museums, libraries and archives.  We must embrace this opportunity to strengthen the place of museums within the wider cultural landscape.</p> <p>We tend to talk about convergence in the context of television and the Internet.  However, in my view, we are also in need of much greater cultural convergence, with far closer working between museums and with the wider cultural sector as well as with the creative industries.  </p> <p>Not only is there opportunity for digital convergence, but also much closer working in terms of sharing collections, expertise and audiences. These opportunities are echoed in the recommendations of the Leading Museums Group, led by Professor Tom Schuller and published by the MLA this week. I welcome this work, and am delighted to note that your President has been among those who have worked on it. </p> <p>As the report notes, this is a time to explore ways to work together both across the museum sector and beyond. <br>Of course, many of you here today are from independent museums which are vitally important to the economy and to our tourist industry – bringing in around 9 million visitors a year. <br><br>These museums will also face pressures over the coming year, but perhaps more than publicly funded museums, they know the importance of being entrepreneurial,. There is real potential here for publicly funded museums to learn from them.<br><br>There are, I believe, huge opportunities in networks of strength and expertise  – across cities, across particular collections, across areas of educational expertise.  And as I said earlier – across the creative industries – and let’s see where the conversation might lead. <br><br>I am struck by the way the best museums are already extending their reach. The British Museum  is one of the nationals with a well-developed partnership programme involving university, local authority and independent museums. The ‘V&amp;A’s work in Blackpool, Dundee and Sheffield shows a national museum forming stable long-term regional partnerships. The Tate is also using its collection and expertise as a resource for the nation, delivering benefits right across the UK.  </p> <p>Here in Manchester, the Manchester Museums Consortium is a partnership of nine museums and galleries – all of which have different management arrangements – which share a vision for the city’s residents and visitors. </p> <p>These museums and galleries work together for no other reason than that it makes sense – they view it as an essential rather than a luxury. And they are stronger for it. I want to see greater appetite for convergence and am determined to enable it wherever possible, for example through funding agreements.</p> <p>Which brings me to the importance I attach to the future of Renaissance. <br>Renaissance has already transformed many regional museums services.   I would like to use this opportunity to pay tribute to Chris Smith, who oversaw the introduction of the programme when he was Secretary of State.  </p> <p>I want to build on these achievements. I am committed to Renaissance, but my challenge – our challenge - is how we will do more with less.</p> <p> There has been an acknowledgement of the need for change for some time.  Last year’s Renaissance Review outlined the programme’s strengths and weaknesses. </p> <p>The MLA has since set out its own vision, and my discussions with them, with the hub leaders, with the Museums Association and with others in the sector have convinced me that it is the right direction to take.</p> <p>At the core of this “new Renaissance” is the recognition that it works in partnership with local funding, adding value and investing in transformation and excellence.</p> <p>Renaissance will continue to use national funding to secure and unlock the potential of the very best regional museums and their collections. </p> <p>Although detailed plans will need to wait until we know the outcome of the Spending Review, I can tell you now that we will move away from the existing hub network. Instead we will create a group of core museums – a small number of non-national museums with outstanding collections and which offer exceptional services to large audiences. </p> <p>Alongside this, a proportion of Renaissance funding will be used to create a challenge fund.  This will give all regional museums access to Renaissance funding to drive improvement and innovation.  </p> <p>Renaissance will also continue to invest in museum development and to maintain support for Accreditation and Designation. It will also back partnerships and convergence on the lines I referred to earlier and it will continue to promote innovative ideas such as “Kids in Museums” and “Museums at Night”.<br><br>There is a great deal of passion for Renaissance among museums.  I am confident that it can continue to be a strong and positive programme for regional museums in the years ahead. But Renaissance resources are going to be even tighter in the future and they will only be applied to efficient, imaginative and innovative museums.<br><br>Collections policy is another area where there are opportunities for museums to rethink their approach.  Our collections are a precious resource and even through times of economic difficulty the public must have access to them.  <br><br>I believe that museums should have an obligation to lend work that they cannot show to other institutions – whether to other museums, schools, universities, or even local businesses.</p> <p>I know this issue is problematic.  The figures we see quoted do not reflect the nuanced nature of collection storage. Nevertheless I welcome the work in recent years by the Museums Association, a number of museums and the MLA that has helped to bring about a more ambitious approach to refining collections. </p> <p>I want to encourage bold and innovative thinking which does not shy away from long term loans, object sharing and disposals. I believe there is much more to be done in these areas, including possibly a new approach to acquisition.   </p> <p>Why not, for example, consider a nationally coordinated approach to exhibitions to achieve a bigger impact and to give the public access to exhibitions of all types from a wide range of museums? This could be a fertile area for convergence, too, and I would welcome and look closely at fresh suggestions you may have.</p> <p><br>Among philanthropists in this area, Dame Vivien Duffield has set the bar high, with her generous endowment of the Clore Leadership programme, which has acquired an international reputation for producing Fellows with the potential to pioneer innovation.<br><br>I am encouraged by these and other examples, and by the willingness of many of you here today to engage in active debate about ways to further strengthen the capacity of museums. This is indeed a challenge for all of us and I aim to do my bit to keep the spotlight on this area, so vital for the future strength of the sector.<br><br>Meanwhile, all museums also need to keep in mind that resilience and creativity run together. I believe there is scope to develop further new ideas and at the same time to significantly increase the level of philanthropy and corporate sponsorship coming in to all our museums. </p> <p>Efforts in these directions rarely result in quick wins, but require long term relationships, and everyone should see that as part of their role. Bright ideas are not the preserve of a few. We can all have one. There is no point having a talented fundraiser if the chief executives and trustees, or the governing body, do not play an active role in donor cultivation. <br><br>The Government wants to revitalise charitable giving in this country. The wider charitable sector is raising its game, and I’m sure the museums sector will continue to do so as well.</p> <p>The museum sector is not standing still, as we see from the recent reopenings of the Ashmolean and Ulster Museums, and new galleries at the Museum of London and V&amp;A. These will soon be joined by some exciting new developments – the opening of ‘M Shed’, for example,  and a new Museum of Liverpool.</p> <p>We have the opportunities presented by the Olympic and Paralympic Games and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, all with the potential to bring new visitors and audiences.</p> <p>So despite the economic gloom, there is a real chance for museums to position themselves ever more firmly within the wider cultural landscape. I am confident that I - and my Department - can support you in this effort over the coming years. </p> <p>Once again, I am delighted to have had the opportunity to speak at this conference and I look forward to working with you in the future.  </p> <p>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7462.aspx Edward Vaizey Keynote speech at the Museums Association Conference uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 05/10/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport Manchester
<p>18 September 2010<br>Penrith and the Border Broadband Conference, Cumbria</p> <p>I am delighted to be here in Penrith and I thank Rory for giving me this opportunity to speak to you all. I have attended many events and meetings on broadband and I’ve been impressed by the interest and commitment to resolving the issues around broadband access. I applaud the community’s efforts in bringing broadband access to this region. Cumbria was one of the first regions to provide community broadband and yesterday’s opening of Nenthead Fibremoor connection is evidence of the region’s determination to bring fast broadband access to those who do not have it. I hope that this event helps stimulate the spread of broadband to the rest of the region. </p> <p>Access to broadband is just as important to rural communities such as Penrith, as it is to urban communities. It is the main driver to the Coalition Government’s commitment on broadband. The coalition government believes that broadband in the UK is a vital enabler for economic growth and therefore an important part of UK infrastructure.  The UK communications infrastructure is an essential component of the UK economy.  A modern communications infrastructure is fundamental to the day to day functioning of UK society. The Coalition Government is therefore committed to delivering a universal service for broadband, as well laying out our plans to have the best superfast broadband network in Europe by 2015. </p> <p>The last twenty years has seen a profound change in how we work, learn and socialise.  We’ve had three generations of mobile phones; three generations of internet access and now have access to computing and entertainment devices of such sophistication that we routinely download Gigabytes of data.  </p> <p>Internet technologies are having a profound effect on our lives and UK network providers, are at the forefront of dealing with this rising demand and consumer expectation.  UK Operators, fixed, satellites and mobile are investing heavily to move from multiple networks for applications like fixed line voice, mobile voice and data to single Internet Protocol network carrying all traffic types. </p> <p>The Government is also committed to driving superfast broadband services into areas where commercial investment alone will not deliver it. We want to see superfast broadband rolling out in the countryside at the same time as it appears in towns. It is clear that by the end of this Parliament, the market as it stands today will not achieve this to the extent we would like. So we need to take action. I want to make clear that we are not rushing to subsidy in the way some might believe is necessary. The Coalition Government believes that the efficiently operating market is the best mechanism for the delivery of broadband services to homes and businesses and that the government should only intervene to either make the market work more efficiently or where the market is failing to deliver to consumers.</p> <p>As a first step, to allow the market to work as efficiently as possible and encourage the private sector to deliver superfast broadband to as many users as possible, the coalition government will be investigating potential use of regulatory and or legislative levers and by making available for private use, infrastructure currently owned and used exclusively by the public sector; infrastructure that is only in place because of the substantial public investment made in recent years.  </p> <p>The government supports measures that will lead to opening access to BT's physical infrastructure (so called 'ducts and poles' access) opening access to other utility providers infrastructure (gas pipes, sewers, electricity pylons etc) and other potential levers that could help reduce cost and ease the installation of new infrastructure and these measures could include new legislation.  </p> <p>The Coalition Government is committed to release the 800MHz and 2.6GHz spectrum to support super-fast mobile services and has laid a draft Direction before Parliament to enable this to happen. This will enable Ofcom to make this spectrum available as soon as possible and we anticipate an auction taking place towards the end of 2011. This measure will go some way to bringing more mobile broadband services in the UK.</p> <p>Let me give you a brief update on what’s been happening at Broadband Delivery UK. Since they briefed industry on 15 July 2010 about its activities and timetable for implementing the Coalition Government's broadband objectives, they are requesting companies with broadband delivery capability to provide technical and commercial information, a theoretical exercise, about how to improve broadband services in locations where supply is below 2Mbps. <br>The three locations for this paper exercise are East Sutherland and Edderton Ward in the Highlands; Quernmore [pronounced kwor-mer] and Over Wryesdale in Lancaster and Mawr Community in South Wales.  These exercises will provide valuable information about the cost of deployment, the commercial models, and technology options.  We would welcome your input into this process if you feel able.</p> <p>Broadband Delivery UK is also in the process of the selecting the 3 areas for the Superfast broadband pilots, which we will be announcing later in the autumn. The Government will assist with the cost of actual deployment of Superfast broadband in commercially challenging locations and the deployment is expected to commence in mid 2011.  </p> <p>Also at the BDUK Industry Day, we published a discussion paper on access to other utilities’ infrastructure. This has recently closed and I thank those who have contributed their thoughts and ideas to the paper.  BDUK will be using this information to feed into their workplan.</p> <p>So, the Coalition Government is pressing on with this important agenda and with your help and commitment, I strongly feel that people in areas that have next to no access to fast broadband will begin to benefit from the advantages that fast broadband will bring. Projects like these are often the catalyst for wider commercial deployment, helping to bring choice and competition across the board.  But Government first has a crucial role to play in creating the right conditions for commercial success and we are determined to do just that. I hope that you enjoy this conference and hope it yields ideas and partnerships on delivering fast broadband going forward.  </p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7441.aspx Edward Vaizey Speech to the Penrith and the Border Broadband Conference uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 18/09/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport Penrith and the Border Broadband Conference, Cumbria
<p>14 July 2010<br>Develop Conference in Brighton</p> <p>I’m delighted to have the opportunity to address the Develop conference today.</p> <p>As many of you know, I am a huge fan of the video games industry.  As I have said repeatedly , the industry ticks every political box going.  It is hi-tech.  It is regional, covering the nations from Brighton to Dundee.  It attracts graduates from the “difficult” subjects such as computer science and maths, the kind of subjects we want to see more people studying at school and university.  It covers a huge range of sectors, not just leisure but also health, education and defence, to mention just a few.  </p> <p>It is not just me who is a huge fan of the sector. The whole tone towards games is changing; long gone are the days when the Industry would only make the news with complaints about content, to today when my speech is being recorded by the Politics Show. They are fast becoming as central to the home as the television set itself and their influence can be seen in the way we learn as well as the way we play.</p> <p>Our video games industry now generates around £2 billion in global sales.  A third of the UK population now classify themselves as gamers. </p> <p>Two thirds of gamers use online gaming sites, and over a third using social networking or other non-gaming sites. Gaming is becoming more accessible to people who never considered playing games in the past</p> <p>Three quarters of 16-19 year olds define themselves as gamers and two thirds of 20-24 year olds</p> <p>In 2010, over a third of men and a third of women in the UK define themselves as gamers. </p> <p>However, we are in danger of missing out and Britain is slipping down the world rankings.  We absolutely cannot be complacent about the challenges that faces the industry in the UK.  </p> <p>So today I want to make it absolutely clear that I remain a committed champion of this industry, and will do all I can to ensure that you operate in an environment that allows you to compete with the rest of the world.</p> <p>I know that many of you were disappointed that the Budget ruled out video games tax relief. However, any defeat, in my view always presents an opportunity.  </p> <p>Or in this case, opportunities.</p> <p>First, there is good news in the Budget for the video games industry.  George Osborne passionately believes in the power of the private sector to pull us out of recession, so there are a range of measures that will help business.  </p> <p>A major package of reform to business taxation, including reducing the corporation tax main rate to 24% by 2014 and reducing the Small Profits Rate of corporation tax to 20% from 2011.</p> <p>The reforms to business taxation in the Budget mean that by 2014 the UK will have the fifth lowest corporation tax rate in the G20 and will continue to have the lowest rate in the G7.</p> <p>But the Budget also relaxed the IP rules surrounding research and development (R&amp;D) tax credit schemes.  This made clear that in future it will no longer be necessary to be the ultimate owner of the IP in order to claim the credit for R &amp; D work being carried out. This means it will be easier for independent games developers doing work for hire or working on commissions from other companies to have their innovation recognized and built on.  </p> <p>In addition the Government announced a consultation reviewing the support R&amp;D tax credits provide for innovation, based on the proposals made in the Dyson Review. I hope that the Video Games Industry will contribute to this consultation when further details are published in the autumn.  I will certainly be making the case for the video games industry.</p> <p>And on National Insurance, the Government will reduce the cost of retaining and hiring staff by largely reversing inherited plans to increase National Insurance rates by 1per cent. We will also shortly announce a new scheme that will see businesses in targeted areas get a substantial reduction in their employer National Insurance Contributions.</p> <p>None of this is a specific tax break for the industry. But it does offer a balanced, competitive package for business. </p> <p>There is in my view a further opportunity. So I absolutely welcome TIGA and ELSPA’s decision to form a committee to look again at the tax situation but I would urge them, as a first action, to review the new tax regime and support measures such as R&amp;D tax credits etc. This is extremely timely because, as I have said, I want to see the industry make a telling contribution to the forthcoming consultations on R&amp;D tax credits in the Autumn and the Green Paper on business finance, due soon.</p> <p>So in my view we have to be more creative and look at other ways in which we can help games developers, particularly as the environment is changing so rapidly.</p> <p>We need to make external Investment more attractive. I know, for example, that many in the games industry believe that the current EIS scheme could be hugely beneficial and I’d like to hope that the sector could take further advantage of it. If the games industry are in some way disadvantaged in accessing it I want to know why and how games companies might make further use of it.</p> <p>But the industry doesn’t simply benefit from an improving corporate tax regime.  There are a number of areas of direct support which are worth highlighting.  </p> <p>The Technology Strategy Board has frequently run funding competitions for collaborative R &amp; D projects.  Since 2004 it has awarded over £4m of funding to games projects. </p> <p>The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council has invested heavily in video games-related activities – most recently via their £6.3m funding for the new Centre for Digital Entertainment at Bournemouth and Bath universities </p> <p>NESTA also focuses heavily on video games. They have invested £450,000 in a programme to help games studios recently. And today I can confirm that Nesta will now pilot ways for games developers to work together to explore self-publishing. This includes a focus on how UK games developers can be stronger at attracting private investment to develop and retain original IP.</p> <p>We have confirmed as well the £2.5m investment in a video games centre of excellence which is now under development in Abertay University Dundee. With local and European funding the total investment in this project is more than £8.5m. </p> <p>As well as creating new lab space and other facilities, a key element will be a fund to help start-ups and small young companies develop new games concepts. It is a direct response to what many developers tell us is needed.  Deliberately aimed at start-ups and small young companies that are vital to the UK’s economic growth.</p> <p>I am delighted this morning to launch formally the new £2m fund to support games IP  run by Abertay University but open to applications from any eligible company located in the UK.  This fund is a direct response to what many developers tell us is needed.  </p> <p>Working with Skillset the fund will also ensure talented students are able to gain valuable work experience with the industry.</p> <p>Whilst the focus is on small companies, larger companies can also benefit by joining as a commissioning partner.  This will, we hope, help build new relationships and encourage cross platform growth.</p> <p>Skills remain an essential part of the debate when we are talking about the future of the video games industry in this country. The games industry relies on a responsive HE for its new entrants. The Computer Games workforce is highly qualified and four fifths have a degree.</p> <p>Skillset’s programme to accredit the best courses is incredibly important.  At present there are only nine out of more than 80 “games specific” courses accredited. Since the last Develop conference there have been new accreditation successes from Abertay, Teesside, Sheffield and DeMontfort Universities. I want to see this number continue to rise though because we need continued excellence in education to maintain excellence in the workforce.</p> <p>I want to go much further in terms of skills. </p> <p>I’m delighted to announce Ian Livingstone has agreed to become my skills champion, building on his role as the chair of the Skillset games council. </p> <p>The Skills Minister, John Hayes and I have asked Ian, Charles Cecil and Alex Hope from Double Negative Visual Effects to work with NESTA, Skillset and others to lead an independent review with to look at what kind of policies we need to ensure that school leavers and graduates have the right skills to work in the games and VFX industries. I really value both NESTA and Skillset as organisations with a strong reputation for the work that they do. </p> <p>Ian, Charles and Alex will look at links across video games, VFX and computer animation, they will study what is being taught at present but looking beyond the course titles and into the subject matter.</p> <p>They will also look at how courses are funded, and how many find relevant employment after qualification. I want to look at opportunities to get involved right along the talent pipeline. </p> <p>And finally a word about PEGI classification.</p> <p>I am enormously pleased to see the hard work and commitment from the industry in getting the new classification designed and accepted, particularly from ELSPA.</p> <p>The new classification system is designed with child-safety as its main priority and will, for the first time, put age ratings of boxed computer games for 12 years and over on a statutory footing; </p> <p>The legal framework is already in place, but there are now a number of processes and Parliamentary hurdles that need to be cleared. It is frustrating but it is better to spend time making sure that these are right at this stage than to have a system that doesn’t quite work once it comes into force.</p> <p>As Charles said in his opening remarks, coming here today could be like walking into a lion’s den, but as a huge supporter of the industry I wanted to be here and to counsel against any negativity because I am incredibly optimistic.</p> <p>On the macro level, I think we are putting in place policies to help all businesses.</p> <p>But on the micro level, there are opportunities to help the UK games industry in terms of specific funding and further fiscal reform.</p> <p>There will be a renewed and imaginative focus on the skills that the industry needs.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7362.aspx Edward Vaizey Speech to the Develop Conference uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 14/07/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport Develop Conference in Brighton
<p>8 July 2010<br>Intellect Consumer Electronics Conference, One Bishop's Square, London </p> <p>Thank you to Intellect for inviting me to speak today.  </p> <p>The early twentieth century US President Woodrow Wilson said “if you want to make enemies then try to change something”. </p> <p>Or to quote Lord Fowler from earlier this week digital radio switchover could cause a ‘major row’.  </p> <p>We must not under estimate the challenge of radio’s transition from analogue to digital.  The relationship between the radio and listeners is a personal and emotional one.  </p> <p>That is why I would like to make it clear today that the needs and concerns of radio listeners will be absolutely central to our approach to Digital Radio Switchover. </p> <p>So. </p> <p>We will not switch over until the vast majority of listeners have voluntarily adopted digital radio over analogue.</p> <p>We will not switch over to digital until digital coverage matches FM. </p> <p>And we will not switch off FM, FM will remain a platform for small local and community radio for as long as these services want it.</p> <p>Nevertheless, it is essential that we maintain the momentum towards digital, and that we start to really pick up the pace and make some real progress.</p> <p>That means a digital radio Switchover in 2015 remains a target we aspire to, but for which a lot more work needs to be done before we can make it a cast-iron commitment.</p> <p>I want to make it clear why I believe that digital radio is both necessary and beneficial to radio listeners in this country.  </p> <p>Digital radio is a huge opportunity for radio and for radio listeners.  </p> <p>Britain already leads the world in digital radio.  Three of the leading digital radio manufacturers, Roberts, Pure and Bush, are hugely successful British companies who are already taking their success here abroad. </p> <p>Some of our commercial radio companies are world-beating, with the potential to become international media companies.  </p> <p>And of course the BBC’s radio content is some of the best in the world.  </p> <p>But most importantly of all, consumers in the UK should not be limited, in effect, to eight national radio stations across FM and AM.  If I were to suggest today that TV viewers should go back to five main channels, there would be outrage.  I hope in a few years time, when we approach switchover, radio listeners will see the benefits of multi-channel national radio in exactly the same way that television viewers have seen such benefits. </p> <p>Perhaps we have already seen a glimpse of this in the public outcry about the proposed closure of 6 Music.</p> <p>Digital radio is the opportunity to strengthen, to innovate, and to engage.</p> <p>Digital radio is already a good consumer proposition.  Twenty-four percent of radio listening is already on digital and over 11 million digital radio receivers have been sold.</p> <p>But it can, and I believe will, be much more.  </p> <p>The FM spectrum is now full and it simply does not have the capacity to deliver the range of services and functions that digital can.</p> <p>The challenge for us all  is to overcome the remaining barriers and allow people to make the choice to move to digital radio.  </p> <p>Conveniently, they all begin with a C:</p> <p>However, there is a fourth C which is even more important:  </p> <p>Consumers, not government, through their listening habits and purchasing decisions will ultimately determine whether a switchover to digital can happen.  The challenge for the radio industry is to drive consumer demand by providing great content.  In this I agree with Lord Fowler’s recent comments that ‘the public have got to be taken with the process’. </p> <p>Manufacturers and broadcasters will need to work together to launch new stations and add value to existing ones, and to develop new functions which are easy to use and engaging, such as the ability to record and pause programmes, or to download music and other content as you hear it.   </p> <p>The BBC is central here, because it currently has more than 50% of all radio listening.  The furore and subsequent saving of 6 Music shows that the BBC is already building a fantastic portfolio of digital radio content, which has already established a passionate following, myself included. </p> <p>So we need more 6 Musics. And not just from the BBC but also from the commercial sector. </p> <p>But the BBC must not simply provide great digital content.  It must also lead the way in the promotion of digital, across all its platforms, as a medium through which to access all radio  </p> <p>But great content and promotion is not enough if your digital radio can’t receive a signal.  So coverage is crucial.  Coverage of digital, specifically DAB, has long been understood as a barrier.  However, action to increase coverage has been far too slow.  </p> <p>There is only so much the commercial sector can do, both in terms of their own financial resources, and their specific commercial needs.  The key to coverage has always been, and remains, again, the BBC.  The BBC has already got us to a position where we have 90 per cent coverage.  But I believe it can do more over the next two years, especially at a local level, even before we begin negotiations on the licence fee.  </p> <p>In-car, or for the techies amongst you, “in-vehicle digital conversion” is a challenge we did not have to address in the Digital TV Switchover.  However, in radio it is essential.  There has been some significant progress in this area and we believe the inclusion of digital radio in the vast majority of new vehicles is a matter of when, not if.  I intend to meet with the major car manufacturers shortly and will re-affirm our view that digital radio should be standard in all cars by the end of 2013. This is of course only half of the answer.  There are many millions of cars already on the roads and there needs to be an affordable and easy conversion solution.</p> <p>I believe we should be clear about the scale and complexity of the problem.   There are already some excellent in-car convertors on the market but we should not assume that the market alone will provide the solution for all motorists or vehicles. However, I am confident that such a solution is achievable with a joined up and concerted effort. Fundamentally, it will need integrity and innovation from the manufacturers, many of which are represented here today.   </p> <p>Related to this will be radios built into mobile phones – or perhaps I should call them cell phones to fit with my C-based approach.  I will be talking to mobile phone manufacturers over the next few months to encourage them to replicate the efforts of the car manufacturers, so that digital radios are available in new phones from the end of 2013.</p> <p>Before I give more details of the Action Plan I would like to take a few minutes to address some of the common complaints about digital radio.</p> <p>First, radio’s digital future will not be delivered by the internet alone; at least not in the immediate future.  There would be massive implications for capacity and energy use if all listeners listened to the radio on the internet.</p> <p>Instead we believe radio’s future is a mixed ecology, with DAB, which is mobile, free at the point of access and cost efficient providing the ‘spine’ of the digital radio offering and the internet providing the added value.  We have already seen a trend towards the integration of internet and DAB in radio receivers.  We welcome this not least because it allows the listener to decide which platform best suits them.</p> <p>While on the point of technologies I should say that we believe that DAB remains the most appropriate digital broadcast platform for the UK.  A change in technology, to say DAB+, offers little benefit to the industry or listeners compared to the impact it would have.  The benefits of DAB+ are primarily a more effective use of spectrum, but DAB already offers significant capacity for new services and there are only so many which the market can sustain.  DAB+ offers very little in terms of data services and functionality which can’t also be achieved through DAB.  However, we must protect against any future change and DAB+ must be a feature of future digital radio receivers. </p> <p>I would like also to tackle the issue of energy consumption.  We have today published independent research, commissioned jointly with the Departments of Environment and Business.  This shows that the difference in energy consumption between digital and analogue radios is minimal – and certainly not the ten, twenty or even hundred times that is often quoted.  The research also shows that energy consumption of digital radios continues to improve. </p> <p>However, energy consumption of digital radio receivers represents only half of the story.  There are significant energy savings for the transmission networks.  At a national level the transmission provider, Arqiva, believes that transmitting Classic FM via DAB uses less than 7% of the electricity of transmitting the service via FM, while at a local and regional level the energy savings are around 50%.  We believe this is a positive story to tell and we will be conducting more independent research in this area.</p> <p>Another myth is that, by switching over to digital, we plan to switch off FM.  We do not.  Let me repeat this - we do not intend to switch off FM.  </p> <p>FM will be available to local listeners as long as is necessary.  There is a fear that when the majority of listeners listen to digital, FM will somehow become a ghetto,.  This will not be the case.  Even today, digital radios allow a relatively seamless transition between digital and FM.  Integrated station guides should, in future, allow the listener to switch seamlessly between their favourite stations, oblivious to whether they are broadcast on digital or FM.</p> <p>Finally, there is concern about the cost to the consumer of buying new digital radios.  There are more than 130 million FM radios in the country, so this is a big issue.  But consumers are already switching voluntarily, just as they did with television.  The key drivers, as I have said, are content and cost.  A good basic digital radio now costs around £35, and I am confident in the next couple of years the cost will fall.  However, there is clearly a balance to be struck between delivering the innovations needed to build a strong consumer proposition and driving down costs.  It is an issue that many of you here today know better than me.  Initiatives such as the industry’s radio amnesty will help consumers to switch, and I am looking to retailers to come up with innovative schemes to help consumers make the transition as quickly and easily as possible.</p> <p>I would like to finish with another C, although I sense as a running theme this is starting to wear a little thin.  However, here goes.  </p> <p>We recognise that that for businesses, opportunities also mean risks and that innovation requires investment.  We also acknowledge that uncertainty is not a great incentive for either risk-taking or investment.</p> <p>That is why today we have published the Digital Radio Action Plan.  The Action Plan reaffirms the Government commitment to a Digital Radio Switchover programme   Key elements of the plan include:</p> <p>More importantly it sets out for the first time the means under which a switchover date could be set.  </p> <p>On this point I should be clear.  We agree that 2015 is an appropriate target date; a point at which all parts of the supply-chain can focus on.  If, and it is a big if, the consumer is ready we will support a 2015 switchover date.  </p> <p>But as I have already said it is the consumer, through their listening habits and purchasing decisions, who will ultimately determine the case for switchover.  Therefore, the target date is secondary to the criteria.  We will only consider implementing a Digital Radio Switchover once at least 50% of all listening is already on digital, or to put it another way when analogue listening is in the minority.  The decision will also be dependent on significant improvements to DAB coverage at a national and local level. </p> <p>I would like to leave you with a final thought.  This afternoon I chaired my first Ministerial Group meeting for Digital Switchover of Television.  A key element of the success of the TV Switchover programme to date has been to co-ordinate and focus the efforts of broadcasters, transmission providers, manufacturers, consumers and Government.  This will again be essential in the lead up to a Digital Radio Switchover. Therefore, I hope that today represents just the beginning of the dialogue with you all.</p> <p>Thank you.<br><br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7226.aspx Edward Vaizey Speech to Intellect Consumer Electronics Conference uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 08/07/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport Intellect Consumer Electronics Conference, One Bishop's Square, London
<p>1 July 2010<br>Re-modelling Library Services Conference, London <br></p> <p>Thank you for having me here today. I am delighted to be here as the minister responsible for public libraries. I took a great deal of interest in your sector in opposition and it continues to be a focus for me now that I am in government.</p> <p>There are three things that I want to achieve for public libraries as your minister:</p> <p>First, I want to ensure we have effective leadership in the sector. I don’t think this means any radical change but we need to better use the leaders we already have, not just to guide libraries through the deficit, but to ensure every library authority is as effective as possible.</p> <p>Second, I want libraries to be at the heart of the digital agenda, which is absolutely intrinsic to libraries’ information role.</p> <p>Third, I want to be a champion for public libraries - I am a genuine fan and I think others - in central and local government, and more members of the public, in fact – should recognise and exploit the potential of libraries.</p> <p>I think these three challenges can be met by creating better partnerships, working better together across different boundaries and at all levels. The next few years are going to be some of the most challenging we have seen in generations. This is a time when we must show more flexibility, more innovation and more teamwork than ever. I am ready to play my part, I want others to play theirs too.</p> <p>Public libraries have a unique status in the nation’s consciousness as places where anyone can go without judgement in order to learn, read, access information, get online, find entertainment. They are spaces for the individual alone or as part of a community. </p> <p>Libraries have an enviable network of estate and expertise and a tribe of incredibly diverse and passionate customers. 325 million visits were made to libraries last year and an additional 113 million visits online.</p> <p>Almost 80% of 11-15 year olds visit a library and children’s borrowing continues to increase year on year. For many areas of the country there are tremendous success stories as library visits increase during the recession. </p> <p>And the library service is in a position to build even more on this success. </p> <p>Libraries are the facilitators of a national passion for reading. The book trade itself is a success story - The UK publishing industry has total annual sales of around £20 billion, just over 1% of UK Gross value added. </p> <p>Libraries support literacy. The Reading Agency’s Summer Reading and Six Book Challenge show some impressive results in terms of literacy rates and reader confidence. </p> <p>But libraries are also places where anyone can go to access information and entertainment, go online and find out about public services and citizenship. </p> <p>Libraries are natural partners and are delivering across a whole range of different areas at national and local level. The best libraries are not isolated services – they are working locally with lots of different services. </p> <p>For example, libraries are helping people to find employment - a vital service during a recession. The Workzone area of the Shepherd’s Bush library in Westfield is an innovative partnership between Ealing, Hammersmith &amp; West London College, Job Centre Plus and Hammersmith &amp; Fulham Council. The project provides a dedicated recruitment and retention service for retailers on the Westfield site and for other employers, helping them to fill their jobs locally. Individuals benefit from a range of services from financial help with childcare costs to help with job interview techniques. </p> <p>Recent research shows how wide a range of health and well-being activity public libraries are delivering. The Healthy Living Hub in Croydon Central Library is an innovative project funded jointly by NHS Croydon and Croydon Council. It offers face to face meetings offering advice and support about health issues and the community setting helps to overcome the barriers that often prevent people accessing health information. The Hub is contributing to Council targets for increasing participation in sport; reducing obesity and reducing smoking.</p> <p>The Leeds Library Services’ Count Me In project is a great example of how libraries support education. The project aims to develop mathematical ideas and concepts for children in three age groups (1-4, 5-11 &amp; 11-14) through story, rhymes and games in partnership with Yorkshire Bank. Parents report a greater understanding of numbers by their children and the service contributes to the financial literacy of older children.</p> <p>Co-location arrangements are bringing many libraries even closer to other public services, be it job centres, primary care trusts or cultural organisations.</p> <p>And there is entertainment too, with Lancashire’s Get it Loud in libraries gigs - showcasing Juliette Lewis, Adele, Florence and the Machine and VV Brown. Library Champions, all.</p> <p>Libraries also have a home at the heart of the Big Society where communities have more of a role in determining the shape of the public service and what it delivers. When David Cameron announced the Big Society Plans in March he said:</p> <p>“[The Big Society] is a guiding philosophy. A society where the leading force for progress is social responsibility, not state control. It includes a whole set of unifying approaches – breaking state monopolies, allowing charities, social enterprises and companies to provide public services, devolving power down to neighbourhoods, making government more accountable. And it’s the thread that runs consistently through our whole policy programme.”</p> <p>This is particularly relevant to libraries because at the centre of your role are the needs of your communities and of library users. You can - and I know many do already - use that relationship to bring about community-led changes in your service.  </p> <p>There are all sorts of ways of configuring the Big Society - The George and Dragon pub in North Yorkshire is now delivering a library service and a pint to the community in Hudswell. That sounds like a good partnership to me.</p> <p>The library service’s ability to reach out and engage with groups who might otherwise be on the outskirts of the community - makes that role in the Big Society all the more vital. </p> <p>The last government carried out the Public Library Modernisation Review.  The Review included some good recommendations which I supported - library membership from birth, free internet access, co-location and I want those things to go ahead.  </p> <p>But what has changed in our approach is this. It is not for central government to come up with ideas, through a centrally managed process, and then impose them as policy on the sector as a whole.  Rather, it is for local authorities to take up these initiatives where they are suitable, and for local authorities to learn from each other.  For example, Norfolk and Gloucestershire already offer library membership from birth, 79% of libraries already provide internet access for free and many libraries are already co-located.  If any library authority wants to take up these approaches, they can learn from their peers, rather than be told to do so by central government.</p> <p>In the challenges ahead it is critical that we commit to improving that quality of outcome, not input.</p> <p>During economic challenges people need the library service more than ever - to help get back to work, to access learning and entertainment and to provide community cohesion. </p> <p>A symbol of hope in turbulent times, libraries have proved their resilience in recent years. The speedy setting up of a temporary library in Cockermouth last year and the impressive number of libraries open in many areas of the country during the terrible snow storms of this winter are examples of the commitment that the service shows, particularly during times of hardship.</p> <p>The deficit will lead to hard decisions and I want to support this process as much as possible. <br> <br>My first objective - effective leadership for the sector - will be vital</p> <p>This is what I am going to do.</p> <p>First, I intend to wind down the Advisory Council on Libraries through the public bodies bill. As a statutory body with no flexibility, I don’t think it is a relevant structure anymore. I do, however, have a great deal of admiration for its members who have each contributed expertise and experience, and whose skills and influence I will continue to value as individuals in the sector.</p> <p>I have previously talked about a Library Development Agency for libraries. Now is clearly not the time to make huge changes to the infrastructure - we must focus on supporting libraries right now, not in 3 years time.</p> <p>I think we can achieve this amongst our current leaders, simply by agreeing our roles and priorities amongst ourselves. </p> <p>With this in mind I am today announcing a support programme led by the MLA and LGA Group who will work together to support councils, especially where councils want to work in partnership with each other in order to drive efficiencies and deliver an effective service</p> <p>I would like to express my thanks to Roy Clare from the MLA and Councillor Chris White from the LGA Group for establishing and leading this programme.</p> <p>I know that changes to encourage co-operation across library authority boundaries are already emerging. So are new governance models.  </p> <p>Wigan and Luton library services are delivered through Trust models and Hounslow library service is now run by a private company. </p> <p>The London Library Change Programme envisages savings by combining borough services in different models of delivery. There are estimated savings of £20m in total – about 10% of total London spend - simply by implementing best practice on a borough by borough basis, although this was not uniformly spread over all authorities. In the East of England seven councils are working together on the SPINE project, which is investigating viable options for sharing their library services - Joining up backroom activities will save at least a million pounds, freeing up councils and communities to concentrate their resources on the frontline. </p> <p>I think that library services need to think even more fundamentally. </p> <p>151 separate library authorities and 151 library management teams is too many.  It’s as simple as that.  This number will not be sustainable in future years.  </p> <p>I would like to see voluntary alliances that help reduce the overhead significantly.  Think about how much we could save collectively if we only had 100 library authority management teams rather than 151. And those savings could help protect the service to the library user.</p> <p>I think library users will be right to challenge where frontline services are closed if library services haven’t thought about some radical efficiency options - shared services, merging functions or staffing across authorities or public services, use of volunteers or of other community buildings.</p> <p>The support programme I am announcing today will involve some intensive, proactive work with about ten library authorities initially, to investigate where they can drive down costs whilst maintaining a quality service. This will not be a ‘one size fits all’ approach.  It is based on the principle that the solutions will be owned and driven by councils.</p> <p>This is a great opportunity to be at the forefront of that innovative thinking, and we envisage a lot of interest from library authorities – those who are selected as the first wave will be confirmed over the next few weeks.</p> <p>The best learning from those pioneering library services will then be disseminated across the wider public library network so that everyone can benefit from the work.</p> <p>The Project Board for the work will include representatives from the MLA, LGA Group, and central Government as well as CILIP, Race Online and the Society of Chief Librarians - who all have contributions to make. </p> <p>If this approach is effective, we will consider extending the support programme to take on a wider agenda when the time is right. This could include other priority areas such as co-location with other services, training and skills and disseminating best practice. That next stage could then co-opt library leaders and colleagues with the relevant expertise. </p> <p>I hope that through the support programme we can model the pioneers in the sector, capture their learning and create templates which can be used and adapted by others.</p> <p>My second objective is to promote the vital role of libraries in the digital agenda. </p> <p>I am the first minister to bring together the culture and digital briefs</p> <p>I believe that librarians are more important than ever in a digital age. The core role of a librarian is to manage information.  With an almost infinite amount of information now available, that role is now indispensable.  Librarians today should be trained to be able to guide users to the best and most reliable sources of the information they need on-line.  Equally importantly, they should be able to guide library users of whatever age to stay safe on-line, be it from identity theft or even more sinister developments. And with the increasing number of complex gadgets now available, a library should be a place to go for guidance and help on what to use and how to use it.</p> <p>I recognise also the vital contribution libraries make to digital inclusion.  Libraries provide a remarkable level of service for people to get online every day. Involved with projects like Silver Surfers Day and Get Online Day, there is an average of 762 hours of internet access available across all libraries in a Local Authority area per week. Large libraries typically get 6,500 visitors a week using their internet access. </p> <p>I want to see libraries right at the heart of the digital inclusion mission. </p> <p>Race Online 2012, led by the UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox, is inviting partners who wish to help get the UK 100% online by the time of the Olympics to signal their commitment on the Race Online website. </p> <p>I am announcing today – in collaboration with the Society of Chief Librarians - a public library promise to Race Online 2012. To reduce the digital divide, the library network will work together to reach out to half a million digitally excluded people and support them to become confident digital citizens by the end of 2012. </p> <p>My third commitment is to do my best to be a champion for libraries as your minister.</p> <p>I will do my best to link the library service to national priorities and get libraries on big agendas like digital inclusion, like the Big Society, like health and education. </p> <p>Earlier today, for instance, the Deputy Prime Minister was in a library in East London launching a public consultation which allows people to contribute ideas and comments that will inform the process of repealing bits of legislation, cutting red tape and restoring civil liberties.  The Deputy Prime Minister recognised instinctively that, as hubs of community activity, libraries are an ideal setting for people to engage with government, public services and to play their part as citizens.</p> <p>As your minister I promise to keep emphasizing the importance of libraries in this way.</p> <p>But I want you to do the same at local level. I want to continue to hear about innovative partnerships between libraries and other services, to hear about libraries delivering on key policies for their local authorities. </p> <p>I also want to challenge the leadership at local authority level to look at the opportunities that libraries offer.  I will be writing to all chief executives to underline this point. The best library authorities have support at political and chief executive level and are able to make connections across their organisations and policies for the benefit of communities. Libraries offer opportunities and sustainable solutions – they are not a service that is simply an easy cut in tough times. </p> <p>So these are my three priorities:</p> <p>I hope that you will help me to deliver those objectives. I am publishing this speech online in a commentable form and you can access it through the DCMS website. I look forward to reading your views. </p> <p></p> <p>This speech was available for online comment at <a title="opens in a new window" href="http://writetoreply.org/re-modelling-libraries-2010/" target="_blank">Write to reply &gt; re- modelling public libraries</a> from 1 - 8 July 2010. Although commenting is now closed you can still <a title="opens in a new window" href="http://writetoreply.org/re-modelling-libraries-2010/?comment-browser=posts" target="_blank">browse comments posted by others</a>.    <br><br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7223.aspx Edward Vaizey Re-modelling partnerships to meet the challenges of 2010 uk.org.publicwhip/member/1905 01/07/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport
<p>Monday 18 July 2011</p> <p><strong>The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (John Penrose): <br></strong><br>I am publishing today a statement regarding the future governance of the eight Royal Parks and the Royal Parks Agency.<br><br>In my Ministerial Written Statement to both Houses on the 18 January 2011, I outlined how the Government was committed to transferring more responsibility for the management of the eight Royal Parks to the Greater London Authority (GLA) and to ensuring that Londoners had a voice in how the Parks are managed. </p> <p>I have now considered a range of options for how best to achieve our objective of greater accountability to the GLA and to Park users and local residents.  I do not believe that primary legislation is necessary to transfer responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Parks.  Instead, I believe that it is possible to achieve an outcome that allows the Mayor and local interests to have a significant say in how the Royal Parks are managed which is also cost effective.  </p> <p>Our intention is that Crown ownership of the Royal Parks will be maintained. The Royal Parks will remain an Executive Agency of DCMS and the responsibility of the Secretary of State but we will create a new Royal Parks Board to provide a voice for the Mayor and for London in how the Parks are managed.  The Chair and Board will be appointed by the Mayor, with Board members including representatives of the London boroughs and the Royal Household.  At the same time, we will task the Board to develop and recommend new consultation processes that will give local communities and users of the Parks a role in decision-making. The details of these new governance arrangements will be announced in due course. Board arrangements will be kept under review by the Secretary of State. <br><br>[Ends]</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8324.aspx John Penrose Written Ministerial Statement on the Royal Parks Agency uk.org.publicwhip/member/1924 18/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Thursday 14 July 2011</p> <p><strong>The Minister for Tourism and Heritage (John Penrose):</strong> </p> <p>British consumers face different consumer protection arrangements and have to deal with a myriad of different regulators and languages depending on where the gambling they are taking part in is regulated.  This problem is growing as more countries permit online gambling.  At the same time, it is unfair to GB-licensed gambling operators that overseas competitors benefit from access to the market in Great Britain without bearing a fair share of the costs of regulation, or of research, education and treatment of problem gambling.</p> <p>I am proposing that the Gambling Act should be amended so that remote gambling is regulated on a point of consumption basis, so that all operators selling into the British market, whether from here or abroad, will be required to hold a Gambling Commission licence to enable them to transact with British consumers and to advertise in Great Britain.  </p> <p>As I intend to allow operators anywhere in the world to apply for a Gambling Commission licence, my proposals will mean that the white list will be phased out, although the Gambling Commission will ensure that regulatory good practice is recognised so that overseas based businesses in trusted jurisdictions such as the white listed countries, will have much lighter touch approach and, for example, will not have to duplicate regulatory work. </p> <p>To ensure the minimum disruption for operators in the British market, I intend to put in place a period of transition which will see operators already licensed in EEA Member States and the existing white-listed jurisdictions entitled to or eligible for an automatic transitional licence to prevent them having to cease trading.  </p> <p>These proposals are an important measure to help address concerns about problem gambling and to bridge a regulatory gap, by ensuring that British consumers will enjoy consistent standards of protection, no matter which online gambling site they visit.  For example, previous work by the Gambling Commission has highlighted deficiencies in some remote operators’ arrangements for preventing underage play, and, for the first time, overseas operators will be required to inform the UK regulator about suspicious betting patterns to help fight illegal activity and corruption in sports betting.</p> <p>These reforms will ensure consistency and a level playing field as all overseas operators will be subject to the same regulatory standards and requirements as British-based operators. </p> <p>The Government will work with the Gambling Commission and other stakeholders to develop the detailed arrangements for the new licensing system which will require changes to primary legislation.<br></p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8293.aspx John Penrose Written Ministerial Statement on Remote Gambling Policy Proposals uk.org.publicwhip/member/1924 14/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Thursday 14 July 2011</p> <p><strong>Minister for Tourism and Heritage (John Penrose):</strong> <br><br>In my <a href="/news/ministers_speeches/8306.aspx">Ministerial Written Statement to the House on 7 June</a> I announced that the Government had reached a legally binding agreement with Lightcatch Ltd, the parent company of BetFred, for the sale of the Tote. The Government is now able to announce that the sale was completed yesterday.</p> <p>The Government would like to place on record its gratitude to the Board and staff of the Tote, past and present, for their stewardship of the Tote, and to wish the combined businesses of BetFred and the Tote a successful future.</p> <p>The Government will now enter into detailed discussions with representatives of the Racing industry on the design of a scheme for disbursing its share of the net proceeds of sale in a manner which complies with EU State Aid rules.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8305.aspx John Penrose Written Ministerial Statement on Sale of the Horserace Totalisator Board (The Tote) uk.org.publicwhip/member/1924 14/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Tuesday 7 June 2011</p> <p><strong>Minister for Tourism and Heritage (John Penrose):</strong> <br><br>In my written ministerial statement of <a href="/news/ministers_speeches/7749.aspx">31 January 2011</a>, I said that the Government expected to be in a position to provide the House with a further update in the spring on the process for resolving the future of the Tote.</p> <p>I am now able to inform the House that, after a thorough, fair and open process, the Government entered into a legally binding agreement to dispose of their interest in the Tote’s successor company to Betfred on 3 June 2011 for a total consideration of £265 million. This is an excellent price, and fulfils commitments made in Budgets 2010 and 2011 to resolve the future of the Tote by June 2011. The Government strongly believe that the terms of the sale, which include important commitments by Betfred both to racing and to staff, provide an excellent outcome for the key stakeholders, and also for the taxpayer.</p> <p>As I said in my statement of 31 January the Government will also honour the commitment of the previous Government to share 50% of the net cash proceeds of the sale with racing. This amounts to over £90 million and will be made available over a number of years, reflecting the broader fiscal position and the need to spend the funds in a manner consistent with EU state aid rules. The Government will pay interest on the outstanding balance, as appropriate, in the normal way.</p> <p>The Government now look forward to working closely with racing to discuss the detail and to design appropriate arrangements.</p> <p>The Government expect to complete the sale after the conclusion of a four to eight-week TUPE consultation and wider information sharing process with employees of the Tote. The final consideration will be subject to a technical, market standard adjustment (upwards or downwards) after completion to reflect the actual level of net debt and working capital on the Tote’s balance sheet on the day the transaction completed.</p> <p> </p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8306.aspx John Penrose Written Ministerial Statement on the Horserace Totalisator Board (The Tote) uk.org.publicwhip/member/1924 07/06/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Monday 14 March 2011<br>VisitEngland conference, Cambridge</p> <p><strong>Please check against delivery<br></strong></p> <p>A little over a week ago we published a new strategy for tourism. <br> <br>Policy, Blueprint, Action Plan – you can call it what you like, but the important thing is that it is significantly different to any equivalent document about tourism that any UK Government has issued before.  And the reason it’s different is that, this time, it’s not just warm words and sound-bites – a pound of fluff and spin for every ounce of firm commitment - it’s trying to turn some of our basic preconceptions on their heads.</p> <p>Yes, there are the headline-grabbing bells and whistles: plans to start a public debate about moving the May Day bank holiday, make tourist road signs more user-friendly and even to make a virtue – in marketing terms - of our climate and weather.  </p> <p>But the real meat and potatoes (as they say in the States) is to be found below the eye-catching stuff.</p> <p>That’s because we want – and I feel I almost have to whisper this, because for some this may sound like Orwellian thought-crime - to put the customer first.  Heresy, I know.  But that really is what our tourism policy aims to do.  </p> <p>Let me explain.</p> <p>When people decide to go on holiday with their friends or families, they’re very often committing to spending a great deal of money.  For families, indeed, it may be the one time in the year when everyone gets together in what they hope will be happy and relaxed circumstances.  </p> <p>To put it bluntly – people go on holiday to have a good time, and they’re prepared to pay a lot, and take a lot of trouble, to get it right.</p> <p>So how, traditionally, has Government responded to this rather important – and obvious - requirement?  </p> <p>Well, it has:</p> <p>But many of these approaches are as daft and dated as the red faced old chap, asleep in a deckchair with a knotted handkerchief on his head, that was our image of holidaymaking fifty or more years ago.</p> <p>These days, people go to particular places – destinations, as we call them these days – not ‘regions’ for their holidays.  They think nothing of moving around, having a week walking in the lakes then driving down to the Gower to take it easy for a few days.  </p> <p>For some, wheelchair access to the holiday venue for just one member of the party will be a deciding factor, or the carbon footprint of the place, or any other quirky thing that ‘the Government Inspector’ can’t capture on his clipboard, but means a lot to some guests.  So we will put the industry back in charge of the rating system, rather than expecting bureaucrats – however clever and well intentioned – to know better than business people whose job depends on getting it right. After all, we don’t have Government run ratings systems for cars or cornflakes, so why should holidays be any different?</p> <p>And putting the emphasis back on to the customer – turning the tourist model on its head – doesn’t just apply to holidaymakers.  For us in Government, tourist businesses are our customers too.  They pay taxes to the Exchequer – and they leave us in no doubt of that, I can tell you - and are perfectly entitled to expect a proper say in our policy making and decisions.</p> <p>These businesses come in all shapes and sizes.  Many are small and more prone than most to founder when the economy suffers, and that’s why we are very deliberately giving them a bigger stake – and a stronger voice – in the promotion of their local market.  Small and medium sized businesses can feel lost in the region-wide administrations that are purportedly their representatives. </p> <p>So we’re out to create strong, sustainable and independent local tourism boards.  Forums where it’s clearly in the interest of stakeholders large and small to get involved, because there becomes a direct relationship between what members put in and what they get out.  Tourism bodies whose zones of interest and influence are defined by a genuine sense of place, not an arbitrary line on an electoral boundary map.  Local decisions taken locally by those best-placed to take them: local businesses in majority partnership with public bodies, and the absolute bare minimum of high-level interference.</p> <p>We want a new way of doing things.  Bottom-up, and customer focused, with strong independent local bodies.  An internationally-focused organisation – VisitBritain – with a targeted  £100 million marketing budget to help bring people here from overseas, national bodies to take care of issues directly involving the individual countries within the UK, and a host of small and sharply-focused Destination Marketing Organisations.</p> <p>Let me finish as I started.  Yes, the media have  written thousands of words about whether we should put the clocks forward as part of this strategy.  I hope and believe that, as a result of this new policy we will be putting the clocks forward for the UK tourism industry – by 20 or 30 years, if we possibly can.</p> <p>The next two years see an amazing coming together of events and circumstances that will put the UK in the spotlight as never before.  It will be a fantastic opportunity for the tourism industry, and one that I know they will grab with both hands.  Our strategy will make this easier for them to do so, and I commend it to you.</p> <p> </p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7945.aspx John Penrose Extract from a speech by Tourism Minister John Penrose at VisitEngland conference, Cambridge uk.org.publicwhip/member/1924 14/03/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport VisitEngland conference, Cambridge
<p>31 January 2011</p> <p><strong>The Minister for Tourism and Heritage (John Penrose):</strong> <br><br>The Government announced in a Written Ministerial Statement on 15 September 2010 that preparations were underway to launch an open market process to resolve the future of the Tote. This followed the announcement in the Budget of 22 June 2010 that the future of the Tote would be resolved within 12 months in a way that secures value for the taxpayer and which recognises the support the Tote currently provides to the racing industry.</p> <p>The Government can now inform the House that the first stage of that open market process has been successful. The Government is pleased with the level of interest shown in the process. 18 indicative proposals were received, each of which has been assessed against the Government’s objectives.</p> <p>Following this review, a selected number of parties has now been invited to advance to the next stage of the process where they will receive more detailed information.  The Government expects to be in a position to provide the House with a further update in the spring.  </p> <p>Given the commercially sensitive nature of the process the Government will not be making public the details of the individual proposals received as part of the open market process nor the identity of those parties that have been invited to participate in the next stage.</p> <p>The Government can also confirm that in the event that the Tote is sold on the open market it will honour the commitment of the previous Government to share 50% of the net cash proceeds of sale with Racing. The proceeds will be made available over the Spending Review period (or longer if the sale proceeds are particularly high) because of the broader fiscal position and the need to spend the funds consistent with EU state aid rules, but the Government will pay interest on the outstanding balance in the normal way. The Government looks forward to working closely with Racing in the event of an open market sale to design appropriate arrangements.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/7749.aspx John Penrose Ministerial Written Statement on the future of the Horserace Totalisator Board uk.org.publicwhip/member/1924 31/01/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Wednesday 15 September 2010</p> <p><strong>The Minister for Tourism and Heritage (John Penrose): </strong></p> <p>The Government announced in the Budget on 22 June that they would over the next 12 months resolve the future of the Tote in a way that secures value for the taxpayer and which recognises the support the Tote currently provides to the racing industry.</p> <p>In line with that objective, the Government are now preparing to launch an open market process in the late autumn in which they will invite proposals from interested parties. This process will be open to all organisations who have an interest in the Tote, and the Government expect to be in a position to update the House early in the new year.</p> <p>The Government will continue to liaise closely with the board of the Tote and with racing interests as this process unfolds.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8186.aspx John Penrose Ministerial Written Statement on the Horserace Totalisator Board uk.org.publicwhip/member/1924 15/09/2010 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Tuesday 19 July 2011</p> <p><strong>The Minister for Sport and the Olympics (Hugh Robertson):</strong> <br><br>I am publishing today the Government Olympic Executive’s Quarterly Report – <a href="/publications/8308.aspx">London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games Quarterly Report July 2011</a>. This report explains the latest budget position as at 30 June 2011, and outlines some of the many wider economic and social benefits to the UK.  </p> <p>The overall Public Sector Funding Package (PSFP) for the Games remains at £9.298bn. As reported in the Annual Report in February this year, the breakdown of the funding package altered from April 2011 reflecting the changing focus of the programme from construction to the operational delivery of the Games. We continue to seek value for money and cost savings in our day-to-day running of the project. The ODA has also achieved additional significant savings in the quarter and, with just over a year to go to the 2012 Games, the Anticipated Final Cost (AFC), which is the current forecast of the final cost of the ODA’s programme, including risks, scope changes and inflation is £7.250bn, compared to £7.266bn at the end of March 2011, a total decrease of £16m.</p> <p>In the last quarter £1.5m was released from the PSFP to support crowd management and public safety at the sailing venue in Weymouth. An additional £0.8m was also released to dress two venues outside London and expand the installation of Olympic rings and Paralympic Agitos on buildings in the UK, while £3.1m was released for a small number of additional events as part of the London 2012 Festival. </p> <p>Throughout the Big Build, the ODA has made strong progress in preparing the venues and infrastructure at the Olympic Park with 88 per cent of the Games-time construction programme now completed and in many cases ahead of schedule. Completed venues now include the Velodrome, the main Stadium (running track to be laid later this year), the Handball Arena, the Basketball Arena and the International Broadcast Centre (IBC). Construction works are nearing completion on the Aquatics Centre which remains on track to be finished by 27 July 2011 – one year to go until the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic Games. The venue will be unveiled by the ODA to mark one year to go.</p> <p>The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games are continuing to help businesses and people through the difficult economic times. The Games are also benefitting those living in the host boroughs, with nearly 25 per cent of those working on the Park hailing from the surrounding area. Currently, over 40,000 people have experienced work on the Olympic Park and Athlete’s Village since April 2008. More than 98 per cent of the ODA’s suppliers are based in the UK whether they be supplying the official merchandise for London 2012 or supplying the rain-screen cladding on the Olympic Stadium. Smaller businesses have also had the chance to share in the success of the Games with 73 per cent of CompeteFor contracts awarded to SMEs. </p> <p>The Games are also supporting the Government’s Plan for Growth, by providing unique opportunities for business across the UK to grow internationally. UK Trade &amp; Investment (UKTI) is enabling this through the Host 2 Host programme which seeks to maximise the economic benefits of hosting the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympics Games.  The programme allows business to created links and share best practice with previous and future host cities of Olympic Games and other major sporting events. </p> <p>I would like to commend this report to the members of both Houses and thank them for their continued interest in and support for the London 2012 Games.</p> <p>Copies of the <a href="/publications/8308.aspx">Quarterly Report July 2011</a> are available online at the DCMS website and will be deposited in the libraries of both Houses.</p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8335.aspx Hugh Robertson Ministerial Written Statement: Government Olympic Executive (GOE) Quarterly Report, July 2011 uk.org.publicwhip/member/1583 19/07/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport None
<p>Tuesday 10 May 2011<br>Geneva</p> <p>It is a great honour to address the Second Forum on Sport for Development and Peace; I don’t say that lightly.</p> <p>Even though I am here as the UK’s Minister for Sport and the Olympics, this Forum brings together two organisations with a special place in my personal affections.</p> <p>The first, the IOC, has awarded London the honour of hosting the Olympic Games next year.  I would publicly like to thank the President, and the IOC, for all the help, encouragement and friendship that they have extended to us over the past six years.  The work of the Co-ordinating Commission, the IOC’s panel of experts, headed by Denis Oswald, many of those members are here today, has been invaluable and as a country, we very much appreciate your help in delivering London 2012 and your wider work for world sport.  </p> <p>I would also like to extend my thanks to the President for his personal lead in the fight against corruption in sport.  If those watching sport ever cease to believe that the contest they are watching is not a fair contest between individuals and teams, then many of the benefits of sport that we will discuss today will be lost.  </p> <p>Thank you, sir, for your personal commitment to this fight and for the global lead that the IOC is giving over this issue.  </p> <p>The second organisation, the UN, is also one close to my heart.  </p> <p>As a young army officer, I served twice with the UN Peacekeeping forces in, first, Cyprus and, later, in Sarajevo, a former Olympic host city, during the siege.  </p> <p>I also chaired the UN group in our Parliament before I became a Minister so I am a great supporter of the work of the UN.  I am delighted that my government is supporting the work of the UN Sport for Development and Peace movement.  </p> <p>I think that we are also at an exciting turning point with this agenda.</p> <p>The issue is how we use sport more effectively to contribute to the Millennium Development Goals – and, crucially, how we measure and sustain progress.<br><br>So I don’t come here with any definitive answers. But what I did want to do today is –</p> <p>Firstly, give you a brief overview of the work we’re doing as part of our Olympic legacy programme.</p> <p>Secondly, share some reflections on what has worked well. </p> <p>And thirdly, to be honest with you about some things that haven’t worked so well.</p> <p>Let me start by saying a little bit about International Inspiration. </p> <p>This is the UK’s global sports legacy programme inspired by the London 2012 Games and the Olympic and Paralympic Values and supported by the IOC and IPC.</p> <p>It’s run by an independent charity, the II Foundation. And it’s delivered by UK Sport, the British Council and UNICEF - working alongside the British Olympic Association and British Paralympic Association, host Governments and other local and national agencies. </p> <p>A variety of projects are already running across 16 countries, spanning all continents, and we aim to reach 20 by the end of the programme. </p> <p>And the benefits work both ways.  The school links programme has developed partnerships with 300 schools in the UK helping to foster a greater understanding amongst children of the challenges of their counterparts in other parts of the world.</p> <p>The range of programme activities is considerable, but in essence the programme is centred around two key aims.</p> <p>The first is to develop the skills of teachers, coaches and young leaders around the world to increase access to high quality PE, Sport and Play</p> <p>The second is to help local agencies and partners to influence and improve national policies and programmes so that they can lock in progress and bring about systemic change in their countries.</p> <p>What sort of things does this involve? Well, here a few examples.</p> <p>In Bangladesh, the programme has helped to train teachers to deliver swimming lessons for more than 80,000 children.</p> <p>These are children learning to swim in one of the safe ponds that have been built in local communities. Working with the Bangladesh Swimming association, a new structure of clubs is being supported, and talented young swimmers identified.</p> <p>But the backdrop here is the urgent need to reduce the 17,000 children who drown in Bangladesh’s many rivers and waterways every year.</p> <p>In Jordan, we’re working very closely with HM King Abdullah’s Awards programme, and the Jordanian National Olympic and Paralympic Committees, to improve opportunities for young people to get involved in sport.</p> <p>This includes helping with the development of 15 ‘Sports Hubs’ which provide safe spaces for children to play and practise sport, as well as helping to recruit ‘youth leaders’ – young people who are trained to help other children to get their first taste of sport.</p> <p>A particular focus here is among girls who in the past had not been encouraged to take part in physical exercise and sport.</p> <p>There’s also some innovative work – strongly supported by the Jordanian Government and the IOC – for example to help more disabled young children to play an active role in the sporting life of the nation.</p> <p>And I would like here to pay tribute to the work of the whole Jordanian Royal Family and, in particular, Prince Feisal Al Hussein for his leading role in establishing the Generations for Peace Academy, opened by the king last week.</p> <p>Finally, in Zambia, we’re recruiting local leaders to train peers to reach out to disadvantaged children through sport.</p> <p>This isn’t just sport for sport’s sake, but an effective medium for spreading crucial messages about identifying and preventing HIV infection and importantly reducing the scourge of stigma attached to the many thousands of people already affected. </p> <p>One of the young leaders involved in the programme is a young man called Philip, who has been trained up to deliver support for his community.</p> <p>Frankly, he summed up the whole philosophy better than I can. </p> <p>He said that, “If you take a fishhook and put it in the water you are never going to catch anything. If you put bait around the hook, you will attract many fish! Sport is our bait and our messages are hidden within the hook.” </p> <p>Well, I couldn’t agree more. </p> <p>So what have we learnt? Well, let me highlight four things that I think have worked well.</p> <p>First, we’ve found that projects must be embedded within, and make a clear contribution to, the wider development agenda.</p> <p>For example, in Mozambique, there was already a great opportunity thanks to the country’s commitment to UNICEF’s Child Friendly Schools initiative. </p> <p>What International Inspiration was able to do, is review what it was already doing to promote sport and then to make some very targeted and specific interventions.<br><br>The Mozambique Government worked with us, and backed the programme - so much so that the sporting aspect of the child friendly schools programme has been rolled out to seven out of 11 regions across the country.   </p> <p>That takes me onto a second observation: partnership working is vital. </p> <p>It’s perhaps an obvious point, but success isn’t about our agencies working in a specific country, but rather working with that country.</p> <p>In terms of:</p> <p>- Understanding its agencies, and its government, and in particular the challenges they face in prioritising the needs of young people.<br>- Getting to know the key personalities and players. <br>- Working with their agenda, rather than trying to impose new priorities on them.</p> <p>Frequently, we are dealing with sensitive, cultural realities and challenging some entrenched behaviours or attitudes. Buy-in and support at the highest level is crucial for making the breakthrough.</p> <p>In other words, we’ve come to understand that delivering real change through sport is about building coalitions, not mounting crusades. This was a specific recommendation made by the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation in their excellent report on What Sport Can do for Africa.  </p> <p>Thirdly, you have to be clear about the outcomes.</p> <p>In Bangladesh, the priority was quite obvious: as I said earlier UNICEF estimates that 17,000 Bangladeshi children die each year by drowning. </p> <p>The Swim Safe programme led by UNICEF, was already working across seven flood prone districts. </p> <p>With International Inspiration’s help, it’s been able to expand the number of swimming instructors who have been trained.</p> <p>That multiplier effect helps to amplify the impact. In this case: an extra 80,000 children have been taught survival swimming skills since 2009. </p> <p>Finally, evidence is key. Without the proof that investing time and effort does pay off, it’s hard to maintain long term support even for the most impressive projects – at a time when all national budgets are under pressure.</p> <p>We’ve found that we needed to become more forensic, more exacting in how we measured success – and yes, more critical and honest when things haven’t worked.</p> <p>As with any programme of this size and scale, there are things we could have done differently and better. Let me share a few of these too.</p> <p>Firstly, in the early days, we tried to develop and deliver the programme in strands, rather than through integrated working.</p> <p>Different agencies doing different things with not enough central co-ordination. There was no sense of a grand plan, bringing everything together under a clear and agreed set of shared outcomes.</p> <p>Second, I already mentioned the importance of partnership. Again, we found the programmes worked best where the right relationships were built at the outset. </p> <p>If you don’t encourage a sense of shared ownership and excitement for the programme, then you don’t get the long term commitment you need.</p> <p>Finally, I think we learnt over time, you have to be realistic about what the programme could and couldn’t do. </p> <p>The International Inspiration programme is not about achieving elite sporting success. It isn’t a short cut to medal success in the Olympics and Paralympics.  </p> <p>The schemes may help in the long-term, of course, but it is a very long term prospect.</p> <p>Where early programmes fell away, it was because the commitment was superficial and short term.</p> <p>These programmes need local enthusiasm and energy to sustain progress and ensure lasting change; collaboration is absolutely vital.</p> <p>So, based on our experiences, I would say that co-ordination, partnership and realism are key to successful delivery.  </p> <p>In conclusion, yes, there are challenges. Yes, the financial situation is difficult for many, if not all, of us. </p> <p>In the UK, we are increasing our overseas assistance to 0.7% of our Gross National Income by 2013, but we do need to think carefully about priorities.  It is always a challenge to make the case for sport for development against other development priorities.</p> <p>But that makes it all the more important that we fix on the things I’ve been talking about: effectiveness, relevance, sustainability and, above all, evidence of value.</p> <p>And let me say this to you finally.</p> <p>If we get our collective approaches to sport and development right. </p> <p>If we work together and learn from each other, I’m confident we’ll see this agenda expand and mature in the years ahead.</p> <p>Sport can achieve great things for people around the world. </p> <p>- To strengthen and reinforce those founding values of the Olympics and the Paralympic. </p> <p>- To give renewed life to de Coubertin’s vision of sport as an agent for justice and social progress.</p> <p>But more than anything else, to support many thousands more young people across the world. </p> <p>We all want to involve, engage and inspire young people to use sport as a path to a better life for themselves, and many others in their communities.</p> <p>That’s what International Inspiration is all about, and I hope it will leave a valuable legacy long into the future, certainly long after the Olympic torch leaves London for, first, Sochi and then Rio. </p> <p>To both the IOC and the UN, co-hosts of this forum, thank you for all that you have done – and good luck for the remainder of this exciting forum, and beyond.  </p> <p><a href="/news/news_stories/8083.aspx">Link to news story</a></p> <p><br> </p> None http://www.culture.gov.uk/news/ministers_speeches/8093.aspx Hugh Robertson Speech to the 2nd UN/IOC Forum on Sport for Development and Peace uk.org.publicwhip/member/1583 10/05/2011 Department for Culture Media and Sport Geneva
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